Public schools; regulations of foods containing trans fatty acids. (SB1197)

Introduced By

Sen. John Edwards (D-Roanoke) with support from co-patrons Del. Ward Armstrong (D-Martinsville), Sen. Brandon Bell (R-Roanoke), and Sen. Mary Margaret Whipple (D-Arlington)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Board of Education regulations; eliminating trans fats. Requires the Board of Education to promulgate regulations for the elimination of foods containing trans fatty acids from public schools by the beginning of the 2010-2011 school year. The gradual elimination shall begin with their elimination from vegetable oils used in school cafeterias by the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year. The final ban shall extend to all (i) foods sold as part of the official school breakfast and lunch programs, (ii) foods sold in vending machines on school grounds, and (iii) competitive foods sold during school hours. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/10/2007Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/10/07 072418728
01/10/2007Referred to Committee on Education and Health
01/16/2007Assigned Education sub: Public Education
02/01/2007Committee substitute printed 072498728-S1
02/02/2007Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/02/2007VOTE: (40-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/05/2007Read second time
02/05/2007Reading of substitute waived
02/05/2007Committee substitute agreed to 072498728-S1
02/05/2007Engrossed by Senate - committee substitute SB1197S1
02/06/2007Read third time and passed Senate (40-Y 0-N)
02/06/2007VOTE: (40-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/06/2007Communicated to House
02/07/2007Placed on Calendar
02/07/2007Read first time
02/07/2007Referred to Committee on Education
02/12/2007Impact statement from DPB (SB1197S1)

Comments

Concerned Parent writes:

Is this just another of the "trends" like South Beach, Atkins? And by the way, remember when eggs were bad for us 10 years ago. If we keep trying to legislate what is sold in the cafeteria's, then as they follow the policy, prices go up. Because it costs more to buy these foods. It sounds like good legislation, however, all of the bills being passed in the world are not going to make kids healthy. Schools only feed students 5 of 21 meals per week during the 180 school year.....Everything else that goes in the students body is obtained elsewhere. Quit trying to blame schools who serve vegetables , fruits, 2ounces of protein, milk and grains for lunch for making students obese! Enough is enough, already.

Waldo Jaquith writes:

Is this just another of the "trends" like South Beach, Atkins?

South Beach and Atkins are products, sold by corporations. Revelations about trans fatty acids are a result of pure research. So we can see that's not a fair comparison. The fact is that fat is fat -- given the skyrocketing rate of juvenile obesity and juvenile diabetes, and reducing the amount of fat served to our children can only benefit them.

Schools only feed students 5 of 21 meals per week during the 180 school year.....Everything else that goes in the students body is obtained elsewhere.

That's right -- 20% of everything that the average kid eats is obtained at school. That's an enormous amount. And that's just the kids who only eat lunch at school. The kids who eat breakfast at school have 25% of all of their meals at school, and those tend to be low-income kids among whom obesity is more prevalent.

I'm glad you did that math -- you've provided an even more compelling narrative to support this bill.

Concerned Parent writes:

That's right -- 20% of everything that the average kid eats is obtained at school. That's an enormous amount. And that's just the kids who only eat lunch at school. The kids who eat breakfast at school have 25% of all of their meals at school, and those tend to be low-income kids among whom obesity is more prevalent.

It would seem that you can't do the math, 20% is minimal, where do the students get the other 80% from? Lets start regulating the other 80% sources.......