Unemployment compensation; services not constituting employment. (HB599)

Introduced By

Sen. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Unemployment compensation; services not constituting employment. Provides that services performed by an individual on a temporary basis in several circumstances do not constitute "employment" for purposes of the Unemployment Compensation Act. The circumstances include situations where (i) the individual is aware prior to commencing the work assignment that its duration is for a specific period of time and acknowledges in writing that he will not be eligible for unemployment benefits with respect to the assignment; (ii) the individual has been released from incarceration within the preceding year or is a socially and economically disadvantaged individual and the temporary assignment is arranged by a staffing agency that cannot readily find continual work for the individual at the end of an initial assignment; (iii) his staffing or employment agency has subcontracted with a second staffing or employment agency that provides temporary workers to a client firm, and the subcontracting agency does not have the ability to supervise or control the performance of the individual's services; (iv) the services are performed for a small business or minority-owned business that is a temporary staffing agency with fewer than 1,000 temporary workers; and (v) the services are performed for a small business or minority-owned business that is a temporary staffing agency that hires individuals who either have been released from incarceration within the preceding year or are unskilled workers. Amends § 60.2-219, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/08/2008Committee
01/08/2008Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/09/08 088336624
01/08/2008Referred to Committee on Commerce and Labor
01/18/2008Impact statement from DPB (HB599)
02/12/2008Left in Commerce and Labor