Naturopathic doctors; licensure requirements for practice. (HB784)

Introduced By

Del. Terry Kilgore (R-Gate City)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Practice of naturopathy. Establishes licensure requirements for the practice of naturopathy. This bill establishes criteria for the practice naturopathy, including educational requirements, examinations, scope of practice, requirements for the promulgation of regulations governing the profession, and an advisory board to the Board of Medicine. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/08/2008Committee
01/08/2008Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/09/08 084663588
01/08/2008Referred to Committee on Health, Welfare and Institutions
01/14/2008Impact statement from DPB (HB784)
01/24/2008Continued to 2009 in Health, Welfare and Institutions

Comments

Sharon E Hrichak, ND writes:

HB 784 is a bad bill for Virginians. It creates a monopoly for medical naturopaths. It will ultimately make it a prosecutable offense for the many traditional naturopaths owning businesses in Virginia to provide services for their clients, while allowing only a handful of medical naturopaths exclusive rights to practice in Virginia.
Licensure is for the protection of the citizens from a practice that could cause potential damage. The practice of traditional naturopathy is not a threat to Virginians since traditional naturopaths do not diagnose disease or contemplate drugs or surgical procedures nor is it within the scope of their science of practice.

Pat Block ND writes:

Licensure restricts access. This is important for practices that are potentially dangerous like driving a car and the medical dispensing of pharmaceuticals, etc. Naturopathy or 'nature cure' presents NO hazard to the public so restricting access by state licensure limits public access to safe and helpful therapies.
Many traditional naturopaths who practice in VA will be outlawed, prosecuted or put out of business by this naturopathic licensure bill.

Tim McCormack writes:

I feel conflicted about this one. Licensure sounds like a good idea if done properly. Naturopaths are still in the medical field, and so there should be restrictions of some sort.

That said, I don't know what restrictions and laws are currently in place with respect to naturopathy. Would someone mind "defending" the specific position that the current laws are sufficient? I'd like to hear more about the current state of affairs.

Brian Dickert, DC writes:

I would like more of the story behind this too. The Fiscal Impact Statement estimates only 20 Naturopaths in the state.
Are there only 20 who have the education to be licensed under the law as worded?
How many practitioners are in the state who call themselves naturopaths, but do not have an N.D. degree as outlined in the bill?

Star Womanspirit writes:

I have often gotten "better" relief from unlicensed naturopaths (who were not licensed or certified) than from an MD...the medical establishment and the pharmaceutical industry are trying to take away our options.

The FDA recently removed a natural herb from many store shelves b/c it became "known" that studies were showing it was as effective as any pharmaceutical drug at lowering cholesterol....The ultimate goal is to remove vitamins, herbal remedies, etc so that we HAVE to rely on Big Pharma with drugs that have so many side effects...ouch...

Beso writes:

How many people in Virginia who got a bogus N.D.
degree from an accredited diploma mill call themselves a Doctor of Naturopathy?
The reason you know there are 20
licensable N.D.s there are is that they want to be
accountable and can be rightfully proud of the efforts they put in pursuing their education.
I challenge you to come up with a list of 'traditional naturopaths'. I would love to know how you came by your 'Doctor' credentials.

Beso writes:

This is really a wonderful website.
It looks fantastic and allows readers' feedback.
What a joy!
I just had an epiphany and realized that just as online Wikipedia says,
naturopathy IS naturopathic medicine.
some will argue against this, but they will also
put 'ND' after their name.
so, here it is, naturopathic medicine is naturopathy, naturopathy is naturopathic medicine,
naturopaths practice naturopathic medicine, naturopathic physicians practice naturopathy.
yes, i think i understand now.