Teacher salary; requires that state average to be competitive with national salary. (SB267)

Introduced By

Sen. Creigh Deeds (D-Bath) with support from co-patrons Sen. John Miller (D-Newport News), and Sen. Phil Puckett (D-Tazewell)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Standards of Quality; average teacher salary. Requires that the state average teacher salary not be less than the annual national average teacher salary in order to ensure high-quality instructional personnel in the public schools. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/08/2008Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/09/08 080586220
01/08/2008Referred to Committee on Education and Health
01/17/2008Reported from Education and Health (13-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
01/17/2008Rereferred to Finance
01/18/2008Impact statement from DPB (SB267)
01/30/2008Reported from Finance with amendments (14-Y 2-N) (see vote tally)
01/31/2008Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/01/2008Read second time
02/01/2008Reading of amendments waived
02/01/2008Committee amendments agreed to
02/01/2008Engrossed by Senate as amended SB267E
02/01/2008Printed as engrossed 080586220-E
02/04/2008Read third time and passed Senate (36-Y 4-N) (see vote tally)
02/04/2008Communicated to House
02/08/2008Impact statement from DPB (SB267E)
02/12/2008Placed on Calendar
02/12/2008Read first time
02/12/2008Referred to Committee on Appropriations
02/19/2008Assigned App. sub: Elementary & Secondary Education (Tata)
03/03/2008Left in Appropriations

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: HB92.

Comments

Waldo Jaquith writes:

Though this sounds nice, I have to wonder how it would work. This bill doesn't provide any funding, and education is funded almost entirely with local dollars.

Dan Snellings writes:

That's not exactly correct Waklo...the vast majority of small, rural counties in this state acquire the majority of their funding from the state and federal governments. The county that I teach in has an annual budget of a little over 20 million a year, of which 13 million comes from the State of Virginia. Which simply cannot generate enough local tax revenue to adequately fund the schools. There is already a huge disparity in educational funding of communiities simply because some counties and cities have a huge tax base (all those Wal-Marts and malls). It makes you question why a childs education and the money spent on them should be dependent on where they live.

Waldo Jaquith writes:

Interesting -- I only know my own locality (Albemarle County). But the fact remains that there are enormous numbers of schools in this state who are being forced to pay a particular salary when they don't have the money to do it, and the state isn't providing the money. And, if anything, it's even worse for your county: they're requiring you to pay more, but not giving you any more money to do so. That means, of course, less teachers.

Virginia ITSP Association, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

Requires that the state average teacher salary not be less than the annual national average teacher salary in order to ensure high-quality instructional personnel in the public schools.