Juveniles; offenses for which juvenile is subject to transfer and trial as an adult. (HB1120)

Introduced By

Del. Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) with support from co-patron Del. Clay Athey (R-Front Royal)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Offenses for which a juvenile is subject to transfer and trial as an adult.  Provides that a juvenile age 14 or older shall, without more, be subject to a preliminary hearing in juvenile court, and transfer to a circuit court for trial as an adult if he is charged with any offense defined an act of violence in 19.2-297.1, and has been previously adjudicated delinquent for such an offense.

The bill also provides that a juvenile court shall conduct a preliminary hearing upon notice by the attorney for the Commonwealth to the court and parties when a juvenile 14 years of age or older is charged with gang participation in violation of 18.2-46.2.

The bill also provides that a juvenile court shall conduct a preliminary hearing upon notice by the attorney for the Commonwealth to the court and parties whenever a juvenile 14 years of age or older is charged with manufacturing, selling, giving, distributing, or possessing with intent to manufacture, sell, give or distribute a controlled substance or an imitation controlled substance in violation of 18.2-248, manufacturing, selling, giving, distributing, or possessing with intent to manufacture, sell, give, or distribute methamphetamine in violation of 18.2-248.03, felonious selling, giving, distributing or possessing with intent to distribute marijuana in violation of 18.2-248.1, possessing with intent to manufacture, sell, give, or distribute anabolic steroids in violation of 18.2-248.5, if the juvenile has been previously adjudicated delinquent of any such offense. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/13/2010Committee
01/13/2010Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/13/10 10102311D
01/13/2010Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/14/2010Impact statement from VCSC (HB1120)
02/16/2010Left in Courts of Justice

Comments

Susan Lawrence writes:

Teens make really bad and stupid choices. Incredibly stupid decisions with no thought to what comes next, that's why we have a juvenile court and an opportunity for a second chance, with no record, when they turn 18. Education will help fix the problem and is cheaper than prison. A prison education will only assure the cycle of misbehavior and crime continues. Spend the money through CSA (Comprehensive Services Act) providing services to the child in the community.