National Guard; eligibility for service. (HB2474)

Introduced By

Del. Bob Marshall (R-Manassas)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Eligibility for service in the Virginia National Guard. Declares a person ineligible to serve in the Virginia National Guard if he would be ineligible to serve pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 654 and any accompanying Department of Defense Regulations implementing and enforcing this provision, as the law and regulations were in effect on January 1, 2009. Read the Bill »

Status

02/01/2011: Failed to Pass in Committee

History

DateAction
01/21/2011Committee
01/21/2011Presented and ordered printed 11104513D
01/21/2011Referred to Committee on Rules
02/01/2011Passed by indefinitely in Rules

Comments

J. Tyler Ballance writes:

Our original selection criteria for our Army was that a man's butt must not be wider than his shoulders. No kidding, that really was the only criteria.

Given that today's military is used, not for national defense, but as an ongoing social experiment and minority jobs program, no one should be surprised that the lame duck Congress tossed the turd of homosexuals openly serving in the military, over their shoulders as they slimed their way out of town.

While this bill is well intentioned, the way to address the issue and remain on good terms with the federal forces, would be to direct the Virginia Guard to end all recruiting and promotion quotas/goals currently in place and to, from now on, recruit and promote using ONLY the individual's war-fighting MERIT. A MERIT-only recruiting and promotion policy would promote a strong Esprit de Corps, and would better ensure that Virginians would have the best National Guard, possible.

Equality Virginia, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

This bill would make a person ineligible to serve in the Virginia National Guard if he or she would have been ineligible to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States under 10 U.S.C. § 654 and accompanying Department of Defense Regulations implementing and enforcing this provision as in effect on January 1, 2009, i.e., before the repeal of DADT. Equality Virginia strongly opposes this bill.