Juvenile correctional centers; offenses committed by persons committed to DJJ, etc. (HB2065)

Introduced By

Del. Chris Peace (R-Mechanicsville) with support from co-patron Del. Rob Bell (R-Charlottesville)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Juvenile correctional centers; penalties. Imposes the same penalties for offenses committed by persons confined in a juvenile correctional center as currently exist for persons who commit such offenses in an adult facility. The bill provides that the punishment for committing an assault and battery against a person directly involved in the care, treatment, or supervision of persons in the custody or under the supervision of the Department of Corrections or Department of Juvenile Justice who is engaged in the performance of his public duties is a Class 6 felony, with a six-month mandatory minimum term of confinement. Under current law, this provision applies to employees of the Department of Corrections. Amends § 18.2-431.1, § 18.2-473.1, § 18.2-474, § 18.2-474.1, § 18.2-475, § 18.2-476, § 18.2-477.2, § 18.2-48.1, § 18.2-57, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Passed

History

DateAction
01/09/2013Committee
01/09/2013Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/09/13 13103061D
01/09/2013Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/10/2013Impact statement from VCSC (HB2065)
01/17/2013Impact statement from VCSC (HB2065)
01/22/2013Assigned Courts sub: #1 Criminal
01/23/2013Subcommittee recommends reporting (7-Y 0-N)
01/23/2013Subcommittee recommends referring to Committee on Appropriations
01/25/2013Reported from Courts of Justice with substitute (18-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
01/25/2013Committee substitute printed 13104331D-H1
01/25/2013Referred to Committee on Appropriations
01/29/2013Impact statement from VCSC (HB2065H1)
01/29/2013Assigned App. sub: Public Safety
01/31/2013Subcommittee recommends reporting (7-Y 0-N)
02/01/2013Reported from Appropriations (22-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/02/2013Read first time
02/04/2013Read second time
02/04/2013Committee substitute agreed to 13104331D-H1
02/04/2013Engrossed by House - committee substitute HB2065H1
02/05/2013Read third time and passed House BLOCK VOTE (100-Y 0-N)
02/05/2013VOTE: BLOCK VOTE PASSAGE (100-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/06/2013Constitutional reading dispensed
02/06/2013Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
02/13/2013Reported from Courts of Justice with substitute (14-Y 1-N) (see vote tally)
02/13/2013Committee substitute printed 13105096D-S1
02/14/2013Impact statement from VCSC (HB2065S1)
02/15/2013Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/18/2013Read third time
02/18/2013Reading of substitute waived
02/18/2013Committee substitute agreed to 13105096D-S1
02/18/2013Engrossed by Senate - committee substitute HB2065S1
02/18/2013Passed Senate with substitute (40-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/19/2013Placed on Calendar
02/19/2013Senate substitute agreed to by House 13105096D-S1 (89-Y 0-N)
02/19/2013VOTE: ADOPTION (89-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)
02/22/2013Enrolled
02/22/2013Bill text as passed House and Senate (HB2065ER)
02/23/2013Signed by Speaker
02/23/2013Signed by President
02/25/2013Impact statement from VCSC (HB2065ER)
02/27/2013Impact statement from DPB (HB2065ER)
03/23/2013G Approved by Governor-Chapter 707 (effective 7/1/13)
03/23/2013G Acts of Assembly Chapter text (CHAP0707)

Video

This bill was discussed on the floor of the General Assembly. Below is all of the video that we have of that discussion, 3 clips in all, totaling 5 minutes.

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: SB1033.

Comments

ACLU-VA Juvenile Justice, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia opposes legislation that treats juveniles as adults in the criminal justice system. Juveniles are fundamentally different than adults and have a unique potential for successful rehabilitation. The human brain develops well into a person’s twenties, so juveniles have not yet developed the capacity to make mature and responsible decisions. Juvenile offenders must be held accountable for their crimes, but in a way that takes advantage of their unique potential for rehabilitation and reentry. Research from around the country confirms that juveniles who are tried and sentenced as adults are much more likely to commit additional — and more violent — crimes than youth with similar offenses who are kept in the juvenile system.

ACLU-VA Prisoners' Rights, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia opposes legislation that treats juveniles as adults in the criminal justice system. Juveniles are fundamentally different than adults and have a unique potential for successful rehabilitation. The human brain develops well into a person’s twenties, so juveniles have not yet developed the capacity to make mature and responsible decisions. Juvenile offenders must be held accountable for their crimes, but in a way that takes advantage of their unique potential for rehabilitation and reentry. Research from around the country confirms that juveniles who are tried and sentenced as adults are much more likely to commit additional — and more violent — crimes than youth with similar offenses who are kept in the juvenile system.