Voter identification; reasonable match of identification and pollbook name. (HB564)

Introduced By

Del. Vivian Watts (D-Annandale) with support from co-patron Del. Marcus Simon (D-Falls Church)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Elections; voter identification; reasonable match of identification and pollbook name. Provides that if a voter's name as listed in the pollbook matches or is reasonably similar to the name listed on the form of identification presented and the name stated by the voter, the voter shall be permitted to vote. The bill does not eliminate the other qualifications for being permitted to vote. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/06/2014Committee
01/06/2014Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/08/14 14101477D
01/06/2014Referred to Committee on Privileges and Elections
01/10/2014Assigned P & E sub: Elections Subcommittee
01/23/2014Subcommittee recommends passing by indefinitely
01/23/2014Impact statement from DPB (HB564)
02/12/2014Left in Privileges and Elections

Comments

Anne Thomas writes:

Common sense fix to a common problem with IDs. We should not be making it that difficult to vote.

Waldo Jaquith writes:

Yup, great idea.

ACLU-VA Voting Rights, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia opposes the voter ID requirement; however, no voter should be prohibited from casting a ballot based on slight differences between their name as listed in the poll book and form of ID.

Old Redneck writes:

Yes, this should become law.

Texas has passed a law that requires an exact match of names, which is a huge burden on married women. For example, my wife's "maiden" name was T... R... G.... She was NEVER called by her first name, T..; instead, she is known by her middle name, R...

After we were married, she became R.. G.. S..(my last name). But, VA DMV insisted she put T.. R.. G.. S.. on her driver's license. Her voter ID is R.. G.. S... In Texas, show would not be permitted to vote.

We should avoid the Texas problem.