Primary elections; cost and reimbursement to localities. (HB6)

Introduced By

Del. Lee Ware (R-Powhatan) with support from co-patron Del. Chris Peace (R-Mechanicsville)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Elections; costs of primaries; reimbursement to localities. Provides that each county and city conducting a primary election at the direction of the Commonwealth shall be reimbursed in full for the costs of the primary election by the proper political party committee. The bill also shifts the costs of a presidential primary election from the Commonwealth to the proper political party committee. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
11/18/2013Committee
11/18/2013Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/08/14 14100595D
11/18/2013Referred to Committee on Privileges and Elections
01/10/2014Assigned P & E sub: Campaign Finance Subcommittee
01/15/2014Impact statement from DPB (HB6)
01/15/2014Subcommittee recommends laying on the table
01/23/2014Impact statement from DPB (HB6)
02/12/2014Left in Privileges and Elections

Comments

Editor’s Pick
Rick Sincere writes:

If there is a dual primary (two parties holding a primary election on the same day), will the reimbursement be split evenly between the two parties, or will it be pro-rated based on the number of voters in each party's primary in each locality?

For example, in a dual primary held in the City of Charlottesville, 80 percent of those voting will cast their ballots in the Democratic Party's primary, with the remaining 20 percent voting in the Republican Party's primary.

In that case, should the Republican Party pay 50 percent of the cost of the primary or just 20 percent?

In other localities, there could be an uneven distribution of voters with a greater number casting Republican ballots and a lesser number casting Democratic ballots.

The pro rata formula could also be based on the number of Officers of Election deployed from each party at such a dual primary.

This issue does not appear to be addressed in the bill, which seems to assume only one party's primary being conducted at one time.