Sentence credits; drug-related felonies. (HB723)

Introduced By

Sen. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Sentence credits; drug-related felonies. Allows a maximum of seven and one-half sentence credits to be earned for each 30 days served on sentence for drug-related felonies. All other felony sentences will continue to earn sentence credits at a maximum of four and one-half days for each 30 days served. The bill also allows all felons to earn an additional two and one-half sentence credits for each 30 days served for participating in programs intended to assist in rehabilitation that are taken in addition to the mandatory programs in which they are already required to participate. Amends § 53.1-202.3, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/07/2014Committee
01/07/2014Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/08/14 14103419D
01/07/2014Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/10/2014Assigned Courts sub: Criminal
01/23/2014Impact statement from DPB (HB723)
01/31/2014Subcommittee recommends laying on the table
02/12/2014Left in Courts of Justice

Comments

Karen Justus writes:

It would be a great help to families and nonviolent inmates if this bill would get passed.

Keith DeBlasio writes:

It would be even better for the State Budget!!! Without the extra programs and earned credits, the minimum estimated savings is $3.5 million according to the fiscal impact
That doesn't include the additional taxes and spending in local communities from those released.

Keith DeBlasio writes:

It would be even better for the State Budget!!! Without the extra programs and earned credits, the minimum estimated savings is $3.5 million according to the fiscal impact

That doesn't include the additional taxes and spending in local communities from those released. Or, maybe families off welfare when the person comes home and starts working again!!!

Bring them home, put them to work, and stop wasting my tax money!!!

William B Carino writes:

I'm so sick of seeing harsher and more restrictive additions to already harsh sentences put on people who don't deserve to be incarcerated in the first place. It's time that that Commonwealth try a different approach- giving people a chance to better their lives while they still have time to do so.

For example, what's the point of sentencing an already troubled 30 year old to 20 years in jail, releasing them when they're 50 and expecting them to become model citizens? These expectations come despite countless restrictions on welfare benefits, job eligibility, and educational access. This "tough on crime" mentality is wrong. Aren't the vast majority of elected officials Christians? What's more Christian- ruining someone's life over poor choices or doing all you can to give them a chance to succeed?

Vote yes on this bill.