Auxiliary grants; expands eligibility for program to certain individuals. (HB894)

Introduced By

Del. Chris Peace (R-Mechanicsville)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Auxiliary grants. Expands eligibility for the auxiliary grant program to include individuals who reside in supportive housing licensed by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and directs the Commissioner for Aging and Rehabilitative Services to promulgate regulations for licensure of auxiliary grant service coordination providers for individuals with blindness or physical disabilities and the State Board of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to promulgate regulations for licensure of auxiliary grant service coordination providers for individuals with mental illness or intellectual disabilities. Amends § 51.5-160, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/08/2014Committee
01/08/2014Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/08/14 14101579D
01/08/2014Referred to Committee on Appropriations
01/10/2014Assigned App. sub: Health & Human Resources
01/21/2014Impact statement from DHCD (HB0894)
02/04/2014Subcommittee Substitute Adopted (Substitute not available)
02/04/2014Additional information on Subcommittee substitute available from the chief patron
02/04/2014Impact statement from DPB (HB894)
02/04/2014Subcommittee recommends laying on the table
02/12/2014Left in Appropriations

Comments

spotter writes:

This seems to be a very good bill that takes some important steps to solve some of the problems and limitations associated with the auxiliary grant program. For an example of what can go wrong, please google Scott Schuett, who ran six now-closed facilities with 400 residents in the Hampton Roads area of the Commonwealth.

Scott Schuett received auxiliary grant funding to cover 90% of his victims. For over a year and a half after he lost license after license to operate, based on findings that he constituted a substantial danger to public health and safety, Scott Schuett continued to receive these public auxiliary grant funds while these findings were "on appeal." Clear, documented, ongoing abuse and neglect of these vulnerable residents should not be supported with public funds.