Voter identification; accepted forms of identification. (SB688)

Introduced By

Sen. Adam Ebbin (D-Alexandria) with support from co-patrons Del. Marcus Simon (D-Falls Church), Sen. George Barker (D-Alexandria), and Sen. Lionell Spruill (D-Chesapeake)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Voter identification; accepted forms of identification. Adds to the list of accepted forms of identification for purposes of voting valid student photo identification cards issued by any private school located in the Commonwealth or by any public or private school or institution of higher education located in any other state or territory of the United States. Students of public high schools in Virginia are currently permitted to use their student photo identification cards for purposes of voting because current law allows the use of photo identification issued by the Commonwealth or one of its political subdivisions. Current law also allows students from public or private institutions of higher education located in the Commonwealth to use their student photo identification cards for purposes of voting. Amends § 24.2-643, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Status

02/03/2015: Merged into SB820

History

DateAction
11/05/2014Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/14/15 15100596D
11/05/2014Referred to Committee on Privileges and Elections
01/19/2015Impact statement from DPB (SB688)
01/22/2015Assigned to P&E sub: Elections
01/28/2015Impact statement from DPB (SB688)
02/03/2015Incorporated by Privileges and Elections (SB820-Barker) (14-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: HB1429.

Comments

frank papcin writes:

does anyone know how easy it is to just print phony ones,
with no verification required?
who will know if it's real or not?
another student?--it's like a library card

Waldo Jaquith writes:

Well, it would be a crime to do that. I'm dubious that there's anybody (in high school or otherwise) willing to risk jail time for committing a felony in order to cast a single ballot. It's hard enough to get 18-year-olds to vote in the first place—I don't think they're going to be committing crimes in order to vote.

ACLU-VA Voting Rights, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia supports legislation that promotes increased access to the polls for individuals to exercise their constitutional right to vote. The ACLU of Virginia opposes voter ID laws because they are a misguided step backwards in our democracy. Lawmakers should repeal Virginia's voter ID law. Alternatively, lawmakers should expand the list of acceptable IDs to vote.