Abortion; removes requirement that a woman undergo ultrasound prior to procedure. (HB43)

Introduced By

Del. Jeion Ward (D-Hampton) with support from co-patron Del. Ken Plum (D-Reston)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Ultrasound prior to abortion. Removes the requirement that a woman undergo a fetal transabdominal ultrasound prior to an abortion. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
11/24/2015Committee
11/24/2015Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/13/16 16101350D
11/24/2015Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/15/2016Impact statement from VDH (HB43)
02/04/2016Assigned to sub: Constitutional Law
02/04/2016Assigned App. sub: Constitutional Law
02/04/2016Assigned Courts sub: Constitutional Law
02/08/2016Subcommittee recommends laying on the table
02/16/2016Left in Courts of Justice

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: SB53.

Comments

ACLU-VA Women's Rights and Reproductive Freedom, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia strongly supports this legislation because the mandatory ultrasound law is intended to shame, judge, and make a woman change her mind by requiring doctors to provide the woman with the option to view the ultrasound image and hear the heartbeat. Requiring an ultrasound before abortion is about political interference, not informed consent. Information should not be provided with the intent or result of shaming, judging, or making a woman change her mind, and health care decisions are best made by a woman and her doctor, not politicians.

ACLU-VA Legislative Agenda, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia strongly supports this legislation because the mandatory ultrasound law is intended to shame, judge, and make a woman change her mind by requiring doctors to provide the woman with the option to view the ultrasound image and hear the heartbeat. Requiring an ultrasound before abortion is about political interference, not informed consent. Information should not be provided with the intent or result of shaming, judging, or making a woman change her mind, and health care decisions are best made by a woman and her doctor, not politicians.

Jarica Davis writes:

Support this bill, please.