Constitutional amendment; qualifications to vote, restoration of civil rights. (SJ12)

Introduced By

Sen. Roz Dance (D-Petersburg)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate

Description

Constitutional amendment (first resolution); qualifications to vote; restoration of civil rights. Authorizes the General Assembly to provide by law for the restoration of civil rights for persons convicted of nonviolent felonies who have completed service of their sentences subject to the conditions, requirements, and definitions set forth in that law. The present Constitution provides for restoration of rights by the Governor. The amendment retains the right of the Governor to restore civil rights and adds an alternative for restoration of rights pursuant to law for nonviolent felons. Read the Bill »

Status

01/19/2016: Failed to Pass in Committee

History

DateAction
12/23/2015Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/13/16 16101478D
12/23/2015Referred to Committee on Privileges and Elections
01/19/2016Continued to 2017 in Privileges and Elections (12-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)

Comments

ACLU-VA Voting Rights, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia strongly supports legislation that repeals Virginia's felon disenfranchisement provision and automatically restores the civil rights of individuals convicted of a felony, without the condition of repayment of fines, fees, or restitution. Virginia's Jim Crow-era law, one of the worst in the nation, permanently bans over 472,000 individuals convicted of a felony from voting. Of these individuals, 350,000 live in communities, raise families, work, and pay taxes. African-Americans are disproportionately and unfairly impacted---20 % or 1 out of every 5 African Americans in Virginia is disenfranchised. Legislators should work together to permanently repeal this law.

ACLU-VA Legislative Agenda, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia strongly supports legislation that repeals Virginia's felon disenfranchisement provision and automatically restores the civil rights of individuals convicted of a felony, without the condition of repayment of fines, fees, or restitution. Virginia's Jim Crow-era law, one of the worst in the nation, permanently bans over 472,000 individuals convicted of a felony from voting. Of these individuals, 350,000 live in communities, raise families, work, and pay taxes. African-Americans are disproportionately and unfairly impacted---20 % or 1 out of every 5 African Americans in Virginia is disenfranchised. Legislators should work together to permanently repeal this law.

Emily writes:

Voter fraud is a waste of money and time...
31 certified cases of voter fraud in 15yrs most of which were mail in ballots. Who cares about id card these laws are you excuse unwanted voters period

Frontline
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/why-voter-id-laws-arent-really-about-fraud/&ved=0ahUKEwiXhNbv-KnLAhWGKGMKHSZ6CtwQFggqMAM&usg=AFQjCNGTbo43mhQbRME1XzYk79YfWik5lA&sig2=8CHDWyhE2d4gZhVYkY8Idg

Washington Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/08/06/a-comprehensive-investigation-of-voter-impersonation-finds-31-credible-incidents-out-of-one-billion-ballots-cast/