VIEW; pilot program for substance abuse screening and assessment. (HB1435)

Introduced By

Del. Chris Head (R-Roanoke)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Department of Social Services; pilot program for substance abuse screening and assessment for VIEW; report. Requires the Department of Social Services to develop a pilot program for screening and assessing participants in the Virginia Initiative for Employment not Welfare (VIEW) program for use of illegal substances. The bill requires the Department to provide an interim report on implementation of the pilot program to the Governor and the General Assembly no later than December 1, 2017, and a final report on the results of the pilot program to the Governor and the General Assembly no later than December 1, 2018. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
11/22/2016Committee
11/22/2016Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/11/17 17100158D
11/22/2016Referred to Committee on Health, Welfare and Institutions
01/12/2017Assigned HWI sub: Subcommittee #2
01/18/2017Impact statement from DPB (HB1435)
01/19/2017Subcommittee recommends reporting (5-Y 3-N)
01/19/2017Subcommittee recommends referring to Committee on Appropriations
01/26/2017Reported from Health, Welfare and Institutions (12-Y 10-N) (see vote tally)
01/26/2017Referred to Committee on Appropriations
01/27/2017Assigned App. sub: Health & Human Resources
02/08/2017Left in Appropriations

Comments

Linda Oakey writes:

Drug testing for welfare recipients, in the States that have implemented it, has been shown to be a money waster, with miniscule rates of positive testing results. Why in heavens name would it be useful to test people who are trying to improve their lot and leave welfare? I strongly oppose this legislation.

Waldo Jaquith writes:

Governing magazine—a nonpartisan industry publication—studied this kind of legislation in 2012, and reported that welfare drug testing is a waste of money. People on welfare turn out to be less likely to use illegal drugs than the general public, and the cost of drug testing exceeds the amount of money saved in withheld welfare payments.