Temporary driver's licenses; eligibility. (HB1682)

Introduced By

Del. Rob Bloxom (R-Accomack)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Temporary driver's licenses; eligibility. Allows the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue a temporary driver's license valid for one year to an applicant who is otherwise unable to be issued a driver's license due to immigration status if such applicant (i) has established residency in the Commonwealth, (ii) has filed an income tax return with the Commonwealth, (iii) has registered with the Department of Homeland Security, and (iv) either demonstrates proof of a motor vehicle liability insurance policy in force for the year the license is to be valid or pays the $500 uninsured motorist fee. Amends § 46.2-328.1, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/06/2017Committee
01/06/2017Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/11/17 17101828D
01/06/2017Referred to Committee on Transportation
01/20/2017Assigned Transportation sub: Subcommittee #2
01/23/2017Subcommittee recommends laying on the table
02/07/2017Left in Transportation

Comments

ACLU-VA Immigrants Rights, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

ACLU-VA supports expansion of driving privileges to all residents of the Commonwealth regardless of immigration or refugee status. Roads are safer when drivers have a means to acquire legal driving privileges. We should welcome newcomers and extend public services such as driving privileges, social services, and educational opportunities to all who call Virginia home.

CASA, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

VACOLAO supports legislation that opens doors to immigrant communities who have a special commitment to making positive contributions to our society and economy.
This bill follows the recommendations of a comprehensive study conducted by the DMV and ordered by the House Transportation Committee in 2016. The study involved many stakeholders and analyzed the 11 states plus DC where driving privileges have been extended to undocumented residents. The findings are that the roads are safer for everyone when all drivers have an opportunity to meet the same standards of road safety; there are fewer incidences of undocumented drivers leaving the scene of an accident when they do not have to worry about additional punitive measures for being unlicensed operators; driving privileges improves the quality of life for all Virginians and opens doors to opportunity to first generation American citizens whose parents or caregivers are undocumented.