Abortion; informed written consent required, civil penalty. (HB1762)

Introduced By

Del. Bob Marshall (R-Manassas)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Abortion; informed written consent; civil penalty. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/09/2017Committee
01/09/2017Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/11/17 17103836D
01/09/2017Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/13/2017Assigned Courts sub: Constitutional Law
01/13/2017Impact statement from VDH (HB1762)
02/07/2017Left in Courts of Justice

Comments

ACLU-VA Women's Rights and Reproductive Freedom, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia strongly opposes HB1762, which would force physicians to communicate inaccurate and misleading warnings about abortion to their patients for the sole purpose of shaming them and coercing them to change their minds. Even if we disagree about abortion, we can agree that every woman deserves to have medically accurate, unbiased information so that she can make the best choice for her and her family. Women’s health providers already provide this information. By forcing medical professionals to share medically inaccurate information with their patients, this bill would let politicians, not doctors, decide what information a woman receives.

Eva King writes:

This bill is yet another attempt at limiting women's access to a completely legal medical procedure. All under the guise of "concern for women's safety", which is quite frankly offensive.

ACLU-VA Legislative Agenda, tracking this bill in Photosynthesis, notes:

The ACLU of Virginia strongly opposes HB1762, which would force physicians to communicate inaccurate and misleading warnings about abortion to their patients for the sole purpose of shaming them and coercing them to change their minds. Even if we disagree about abortion, we can agree that every woman deserves to have medically accurate, unbiased information so that she can make the best choice for her and her family. Women’s health providers already provide this information. By forcing medical professionals to share medically inaccurate information with their patients, this bill would let politicians, not doctors, decide what information a woman receives.

Mary-Helen Sullivan writes:

Physicians already have accurate information to give their patients. This is another intrusion between women and their doctors. I do not support this bill.

Kathy Stark writes:

Women should be allowed to make their own decisions without getting briefed using shaming and alternative facts. I do not support this bill.