Aquaculture; protection of use in an agricultural zone. (HB1897)

Introduced By

Del. Nick Freitas (R-Culpeper) with support from co-patrons Del. Rob Bloxom (R-Accomack), Del. Keith Hodges (R-Urbanna), and Del. Margaret Ransone (R-Kinsale)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Zoning; aquaculture in agricultural zone; preexisting use. Provides that any aquaculture use that was established on property that was zoned as an agricultural district at the time, but later was rezoned to disallow agriculture, is a valid nonconforming use of the property. The bill also amends a 2014 Act of Assembly that expanded the definition of agricultural products to provide that the act was declaratory of existing law. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/10/2017Committee
01/10/2017Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/11/17 17103430D
01/10/2017Referred to Committee on Counties, Cities and Towns
01/16/2017Assigned CC & T sub: Subcommittee #2
02/01/2017Subcommittee failed to recommend reporting (4-Y 5-N)
02/07/2017Left in Counties, Cities and Towns

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: SB1529.

Comments

Gene Marie Kennedy writes:

Sustainable aquaculture should be protected from overzealous zoning boards. York County is a prime example of what can go awry when the law can be skirted by a calculated zoning change. Shellfish farming, particularly oyster farming is good for the well-managed waters of the Chesapeake area. Arbitrary rezoning that prohibits agriculture should not force already established oyster farms and oyster gardens to be shut down or removed. Given the public trust by statute, it's the responsibility of all Virginians to protect the commonwealth's natural resources. Please vote YES on HB 1897 and SB 1529. See more comments at http://farmtoconsumer.org/petitions/last25.php?paper=1&qnum=pnum1288

Gene Marie Kennedy writes:

Protecting aquaculture creates jobs and keeps more dollars in the local economy. Shellfish aquaculture is a regulated industry monitored in Virginia by the Marine Resources Commission (MRC) and, as such, oyster farmers and other seafood cultivators are conscientious in complying with the various requirements. A forced shutdown because of local zoning changes is unjustifiable and injurious to the producer as well as the consumers who seek the aquacultural products and results in a setback for the environment. Given the public trust by statute, it's the responsibility of all Virginians to protect the commonwealth's natural resources. Please vote YES on HB 1897 and SB 1529. See more comments at http://farmtoconsumer.org/petitions/last25.php?paper=1&qnum=pnum1288