High school graduation requirements; substitution of computer coding for foreign language credit. (HB576)

Introduced By

Del. Glenn Davis (R-Virginia Beach)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

High school graduation requirements; substitution of computer coding credit for foreign language credit. Requires the Board of Education, in establishing high school graduation requirements, to provide for the substitution of computer coding course credit for any foreign language course credit required to graduate, except in cases in which such foreign language course credit is required to earn an advanced diploma offered by a nationally recognized provider of college-level courses. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/08/2018Committee
01/08/2018Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/10/18 18102179D
01/08/2018Referred to Committee on Education
01/19/2018Assigned Education sub: Subcommittee #3
01/23/2018Impact statement from DPB (HB576)
01/29/2018Subcommittee recommends striking from docket (8-Y 0-N)
02/13/2018Left in Education

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: HB443.

Comments

Janet Bing writes:

HB 576 High school graduation requirements; substitution of computer coding for foreign language credit.
I have a PhD in linguistics, and I have spent most of my life studying how and why people learn languages and the value of multilingualism and learning foreign languages. I also recognize the value of students learning to program computer languages, but they are not languages. However:
• The purposes for learning a computer language and a foreign language are entirely different. Both are valuable for different reasons.
• There is convincing research that shows that knowledge of more than one language increases young people’s intelligence and, of course, the earlier a second and third language is learned, the easier it is.
• Many monolinguals do not appreciate the pitfalls of translation, nor do they understand the relationship of culture to language. Today it is crucial that people from different cultures can interact and cooperate.
• Our high school students will be competing with students from other states, as well as foreign students both for university admissions and jobs.
• Computer languages are not languages.
• Many colleges require a second language for graduation

Janet Bing writes:

I have a PhD in linguistics, and I have spent most of my life studying how and why people learn languages and the value of multilingualism and learning foreign languages. I also recognize the value of students learning to program computer languages, but computer languages are not languages, and one cannot be a substitute for another, for many reasons:
• The purposes for learning a computer language and a foreign language are entirely different. Both are valuable for different reasons.
• There is convincing research that shows that knowledge of more than one language increases young people’s intelligence and, of course, the earlier second and third languages are learned, the easier they are learned.
• Many monolinguals do not appreciate the pitfalls of translation, nor do they understand the relationship of culture to language. Today it is crucial that people from different cultures can interact and cooperate.
• Our high school students will be competing with students from other states, as well as foreign students both for university admissions and jobs.
• Computer languages are not languages.
• Many colleges require a second language for graduation

Susan Butler writes:

I am a high school foreign language teacher. Why does it feel like we are going backward, not forward? Computer coding has its place and purpose, but why use it as a requirement for a foreign language which it is not? Both have value. We should be requiring computer classes as well as foreign language, not one or the other.