Political campaign advertisements; disclosure requirements, advertisements placed, etc. (HB76)

Introduced By

Del. Marcus Simon (D-Falls Church) with support from co-patron Del. Joe Lindsey (D-Norfolk)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Political campaign advertisements; disclosure requirements; advertisements placed or promoted for a fee on an online platform. Subjects any message that is placed or promoted for a fee on an online platform to the same disclosure requirements to which print media, television, and radio advertisements are subject. The bill defines "online platform" as any public-facing website, web application, or digital application, including a social network, ad network, or search engine, that sells advertisements and has at least 50 million unique monthly United States visitors or users for a majority of months during the preceding 12 months. The bill expands the definition of "print media" to include any non-video or non-audio message placed or promoted for a fee on an online platform, subjects advertisements in video format that are placed or promoted for a fee on an online platform to the same disclosure requirements to which television advertisements are subject, and subjects advertisements in audio format that are placed or promoted for a fee on an online platform to the same disclosure requirements to which radio advertisements are subject. Read the Bill »

Status

02/09/2018: Failed to Pass in Committee

History

DateAction
12/06/2017Committee
12/06/2017Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/10/18 18100684D
12/06/2017Referred to Committee on Privileges and Elections
01/22/2018Assigned P & E sub: Subcommittee #2
01/25/2018Impact statement from DPB (HB76)
02/01/2018Subcommittee recommends reporting with amendment (6-Y 0-N)
02/09/2018Continued to 2019 in Privileges and Elections

Comments

Amy Hjerstedt writes:

Outstanding! The Federal Elections Commission should already regulate online ads but they don’t (they are a dysfunctional commission). This bill, HB76, provides a regulatory rule for online ad buyers; they will have to disclose who they are, which creates more transparent campaigns and accountability. We’ll know who is paying for online ads so that we can be better informed and more media literate.