Animal Cruelty Conviction List; established. (SB1011)

Introduced By

Sen. Bill Stanley (R-Moneta) with support from co-patron Del. Kaye Kory (D-Falls Church)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Animal Cruelty Conviction List established. Requires the Superintendent of State Police to establish within the Department of State Police by July 1, 2022, an Animal Cruelty Conviction List that is available to the public on the website of the Department of State Police. The list shall include the names of persons convicted on or after July 1, 2019, of a felony violation of the prohibition against cruelty to animals; animal fighting; maiming, killing, or poisoning an animal; or killing or injuring a police animal. The bill requires any person convicted of any such offense to pay a fee of $50 per conviction to fund the maintenance of the list. The bill requires the Department of State Police to maintain and regularly update the list and to remove a person from the list 15 years after his information is listed if the person has no additional felony conviction of a relevant animal cruelty offense. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
07/25/2018Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/09/19 19100153D
07/25/2018Referred to Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources
01/15/2019Impact statement from DPB (SB1011)
01/17/2019Passed by indefinitely in Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources (12-Y 3-N) (see vote tally)

Comments

Mary D. Devoy writes:

This 2019 version is Senator Stanley’s 4th attempt (2014, 2015 and 2018) to create a public VSP Animal Abuser Registry.

He no longer uses the term ‘registry’ he’s replaced it with ‘list’ but we all now it’s a ‘registry’.

Senator Stanley believes public registries are a great idea.

In 2011 and 2012 he tried to take away Virginia’s judges’ discretion in cases with juveniles and mandate lifetime registration as Violent Sex Offenders for all no matter what the facts of the case were, thankfully both those bills failed.

Back in 2013 Senator Stanley and I participated in a Roanoke Times newspaper Point and Counterpoint on the VSP Sex Offender Registry and he continued to tout their greatness in protecting society even though 20+ years of research has concluded they have NOT changed the already very low recidivism rate nor have they lowered the number of sex crimes per year.
Part 1- March 31, 2013: Point: Raising fear, to no effect, Mary Devoy goo.gl/JkGcbD Counterpoint: Why sex offender registries work, Senator Bill Stanley goo.gl/81CEvw
Part 2- April 7, 2013: Rebuttal: Don’t believe every scary statistic, Mary Devoy goo.gl/yMebLR Rebuttal: Sex crimes are among the most heinous, Senator Bill Stanley goo.gl/ph1kPY

Senator Stanley likes to punish and shame people.

Last year in the House Courts of Justice Criminal Sub Committee discussion on his Teen Sexting bill when he realized it was about to die, he told the entire room what his motive really was.

It was NOT to prevent teenagers from facing felony charges, convictions and possible registration as a public Sex Offender for life because too many Commonwealth Attorneys were pursuing such charges, no.

Senator Stanley told the House Committee members (02/26/18 Progress Virginia Video: 36:00 until 1:10:09 -https://www.ustream.tv/recorded/113248454 )that too many teenagers were NOT facing consequences for their teenage sexting because Commonwealth Attorney’s did NOT want to charge them with a felony, face incarceration and possible registration as a Sex Offender and he wanted Virginia teenagers to face some criminal consequences. Yep, Senator Stanley wanted more charges, more convictions of teenagers and he cloaked his true intentions under the guise of it shouldn’t be a felony, it should be a misdemeanor.

So back to 2019's SB1011. As I suggested to Senator Stanley during the 2018 session, if you want to have a registry for animal abusers so that they cannot adopt animals then establish a list that is only available to breeders, shelters and law enforcement and NOT online for their neighbors, employers, coworkers and such to see. He told me he’d think about it.

Well, here we have the exact same proposal for 2019 a public list of Animal Abusers for everyone to see.

Senator Stanley doesn’t JUST want to prevent these folks from adopting animals his REAL goal IS to shame them with a public list. Which WILL result in landlords and employers discriminating against them, not because of a criminal record but because other tenants and employees will see the online registry and complain and pressure the landlord and employer to get rid of the Animal Abuser. Neighbors will also not only speak poorly to the person listed but to their spouse, parents and children. The odds that the property of the person who is publicly listed will experience vandalism at some point will be much, much higher than any other neighbor.

It doesn’t matter that all the data on public registries say they do more harm than good.

Well the ASPCA does NOT support Animal Abuser Registries and I do hope as they did in Kentucky 2 weeks ago, they publicly oppose Senator Stanley’s 4th attempt.

NO to ANY new online Virginia Registries (or lists)!

Ut Prosim writes:

Thank you, Senators Stuart, Hanger, Ruff, Obenshain, Petersen, Black, Lewis, Chafin, Dance, Suetterlein, Mason, and McClellan.
Perhaps you learned from "Robby's Revenge", http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?151+sum+SB1074, in 2015 that Department of State Police "manages" public shaming lists in ways that are not in the interest of Virginia citizens.
Take the case of supplement registrant Elmer S Baber -
https://sex-offender.vsp.virginia.gov/sor/supplementalSearchResults.html
born in 1913, convicted on March 28, 1988 at the age of 74. Oh, but he died on May 27, 1996, nearly two decades before the punitive legislation passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. Yet the Commonwealth reaches into the grave to punish and accepts no responsibility for correcting its senseless passage of another ill-conceived law.

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