Diagnostic X-ray machines; operation of machine. (SB1760)

Introduced By

Sen. Bill DeSteph (R-Virginia Beach)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Diagnostic X-ray machines; operation. Provides that no person who has been trained and certified in the operation of a diagnostic X-ray machine by the manufacturer of such machine is required to obtain any other training, certification, or licensure or be under the supervision of a person who has obtained training, certification, or licensure to operate such a diagnostic X-ray machine, provided that (i) such diagnostic X-ray machine (a) is registered and certified by the Department of Health, (b) is being operated to conduct a body composition scan, and (c) is not operated to determine bone density or in the diagnosis or treatment of a patient and (ii) the subject of the body composition scan is notified of the risks associated with exposure to radiation emitted by the diagnostic X-ray machine. Amends § 32.1-229.1, of the Code of Virginia. Read the Bill »

Outcome

Bill Has Failed

History

DateAction
01/18/2019Presented and ordered printed 19104268D
01/18/2019Referred to Committee on Education and Health
01/21/2019Assigned Education sub: Health
01/22/2019Impact statement from DPB (SB1760)
01/31/2019Passed by indefinitely in Education and Health with letter (15-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)

Comments

NICK GIMMI writes:

I AM AGAINST THIS BILL AS A TECHNOLOGIST AND LEADER IN THE FIELD OF RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY. IM ALSO THE VIRGINIA SOCIETY OF RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGISTS VICE PRESIDENT

. These are specific concerns the VSRT presents to decision makers-

1. An equipment manufacturer is not qualified to determine competency of an individual.
2. Radiologic technologists, those individuals who perform and operate any ionizing medical x-ray equipment, are licensed by the Dept. of Health Professionals.
3. We are duty bound by professional standards to keep patients safe and exposure as low as reasonably achievable.

The Virginia Society of Radiologic Technologists supports registration, certification and continuing education for designated professionals to run this particular equipment. Anyone operating ionizing x-ray equipment must be qualified through education to perform these studies and not by the manufacturer of the equipment who has no qualification in determining the qualifications of such an individual.

Joanna Campbell writes:

As a student and soon to be technologist of radiography, I am against this bill. The equipment manufacturers are not qualified to actually perform exams on patients or to decide who should be allowed to perform exams on patients. They are also not educated in radiation safety nor are they qualified to teach radiation safety. Radiographers are trained professionals that are trained and certified to properly protect patients from unnecessary exposure to radiation. Some random Joe or Jane off the street does not understand how to protect themselves or others from ionizing radiation which can potentially lead to negative health effects if not properly administered.

Nicole R. Winkler writes:

The operation of diagnostic x-ray equipment should never be practiced by someone who is not licensed to do so by the ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists). The operation of distributing radiation is extremely dangerous, especially when patients are involved. The practice of delivering radiation dose should only be practiced by a health care professional who is licensed to practice as a radiologic technologist.

Nicole R Winkler writes:

As an educator in a Radiography Program for the state of Virginia, I AM AGAINST THIS BILL!
It is extremely dangerous for any person, who not currently licensed as a radiologic technologist through the ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists) to distribute radiation dose, especially to patients. Licensed professionals spend upwards of two years to train on how best to protect patients from the dangers of radiation. If this is allowed, patients could be at extreme risk.

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