Abortion; parental consent requirement, ultrasound requirement, hospital regulations. (SB21)

Introduced By

Sen. Dick Saslaw (D-Springfield) with support from co-patron Del. Kaye Kory (D-Falls Church)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Provision of abortion; parental consent requirement; ultrasound requirement; hospital regulations. Removes the requirement that a pregnant minor seeking an abortion obtain either parental consent or judicial authorization. The bill removes the requirement that a pregnant woman seeking to obtain an abortion undergo a fetal transabdominal ultrasound prior to obtaining an abortion at least 24 hours prior to obtaining an abortion, or at least two hours prior to obtaining an abortion if the pregnant woman lives at least 100 miles from the facility where the abortion is to be performed. The bill also removes language classifying facilities that perform five or more first-trimester abortions per month as hospitals for the purpose of complying with regulations establishing minimum standards for hospitals. Read the Bill »

Status

01/23/2020: Incorporated into Another Bill

History

DateAction
11/18/2019Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/08/20 20100520D
11/18/2019Referred to Committee on Education and Health
01/17/2020Impact statement from DPB (SB21)
01/21/2020Impact statement from DPB (SB21)
01/23/2020Incorporated by Education and Health (SB733-McClellan) (15-Y 0-N) (see vote tally)

Comments

William Ballance writes:

This is absolutely horrendous. Your minor child can't get any medical care without parental consent. Yet now they want to allow children to be able to kill their baby without their parents. Unbelievable. Shocking!

Mike writes:

Democrat logic:
You can be 14 years old and get an abortion without parental consent, but you can't be 17 years old and use a tanning bed. You can be 18 years old and sent to war, but you can't smoke a cigarette or own a firearm.

These are the nutjobs trying to dictate to you what common sense is.

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