Earned sentence credits; repeals four-level classification system for awarding & calculation, etc. (HB735)

Introduced By

Del. Rob Bell (R-Charlottesville)

Progress

Introduced
Passed Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by Governor
Became Law

Description

Department of Corrections; earned sentence credits. Repeals the four-level classification system for the awarding and calculation of earned sentence credits currently set to go into effect on July 1, 2022. Under current law, a maximum of 4.5 sentence credits may be earned for each 30 days served. Read the Bill »

Status

01/11/2022: Awaiting a Vote in the Courts of Justice Committee

History

DateAction
01/11/2022Committee
01/11/2022Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100841D
01/11/2022Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice

Duplicate Bills

The following bills are identical to this one: SB578.

Comments

Kenneth crawford writes:

This bill totally kills any incentive an inmate has to better themselves. I can see not letting hardened criminals out early but not non violent prisoners. A lot of prisoners have finished college or attending college and are ready to contribute to society. Don’t treat all prisoners as a threat to society. Even the DOC will agree with me. They can’t handle the overloaded prison population when a large number should be released. I would challenge Mr. Bell to visit a Level1 or 2 facility and see first hand that all inmates don’t need to be there. Most have long sentences because they could not hire a good attorney. If Mr. Bell would like I will visit a lower level facility with him. Thanks for the attention of my letter.

Fred Woehrle writes:

This bill seems like a mixed bag, and will go nowhere in the state senate, at least not unless it is amended.

It is overly punitive toward drug offenders, who should be let out earlier because it costs a lot to incarcerate them, and some of them (drug users as opposed to drug dealers) are mostly harming themselves, not other people.

But the bill is right to make it harder to release thieves, fraudsters, and other criminals covered by the bill. These offenders should NOT get more than Level 1 credits unless they have done something really exemplary, not just the modest acceptable behavior they have to exhibit under current law. Current law is too permissive in granting sentencing credits to thieves and fraudsters.

Maybe this bill should be amended to exclude drug offenders from its reach. Maybe it would have some small chance of passage if it were so amended. Absent such an amendment, it seems dead on arrival in the state senate.

This bill will die in a Senate committee, in its current form.

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