Sen. Scott Surovell (D-Mount Vernon)

Photo of Scott Surovell
Party
Democratic
District
36: Fairfax County (Part), Prince William County (Part), Stafford County (Part) [map]
Took Office
January 2016
Next Election
November 2019
Committees
Commerce and Labor, Judiciary, Privileges and Elections, Rehabilitation and Social Services, Transportation
Age
51
Website
scottsurovell.org
Twitter
@ssurovell
Copatroning Habits
66% of bills he copatroned were introduced by Democrats. Of all of the copatrons of his bills, 85% of them are Democrats. Of all of the copatrons of all of the bills that he also copatroned, 57% of them are Democrats.
Partisanship
?
Tag Cloud ?
Bills Passed
0% in 2021
From the Legislator’s Website

Yellow Line Service Follow Up: Alternative Service Options

August 9, 2022
Several Alternative Travel Options Available While Yellow Line Service is Suspended Need help navigating your options? Check out: https://novatransit.org/programs/novarides/ YELLOW LINE PASSENGERS: As you may recall, back in March the WMATA announced they are suspending Yellow Line service across the Potomac between Pentagon and L’Enfant stations for eight months, starting Sept. 10th, 2022. You can see my blog post about it here: Yellow Line Service Disruptions. As promised, I wanted to provide you with information for alternative service options while the Yellow Line is suspended. WMATA is providing several travel alternatives over the next eight months. This includes free shuttle bus service, alternative rail routes, free passage on the Virginia Railway Express (VRE), and Northern Virginia supplemental services from DASH, OmniRide, and Fairfax Connector. Riders can plan ahead by visiting the project’s Service Impacts and Travel Alternatives information webpage now. The work to the Yellow Line will happen over two phases. Below you will find Yellow Line specific travel alternatives for each phase. Phase One Travel Options-Sept. 10 - Oct. 22, 2022 Free Shuttle Service: Seven free shuttles will be offered during Phase One, including local and express shuttles in Virginia and three limited-stop shuttles crossing the Potomac River. Local shuttles will be available during all Metrorail operating hours. Yellow Line Local Express shuttles will be available most of the day (from 4:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., 6:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. weekends). Yellow Line Express: Huntington-Pentagon Express shuttles will be available most of the day (from 4:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., 6:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. weekends). Yellow Line Express: Huntington-Pentagon Limited shuttles will be available during weekday rush hours only. VA-DC Shuttle 3: Mt. Vernon-Potomac Park (former 11Y Route) (5 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. and 3:10 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.) Peak direction is toward Washington, DC in the morning and toward Virginia in the afternoon The shuttle stops at several locations in Alexandria along the George Washington Parkway, including Huntington Point, Franklin Street, King Street, and Pendleton Street. In Washington, D.C., stops are near the McPherson Square Station at 14th and I Streets, NW, and near the Farragut West Station at 19th and I Streets Rail Service: No Yellow Line service, but Yellow Line stations north of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Station will be served by the Blue or Green lines Note: If 7000-series trains remain out of service, trains will operate less frequently Virginia Railway Express (VRE): VRE passengers will ride free during September and between certain stations in Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia during October. The decision to suspend fares will make VRE a more viable option for Metrorail riders during the closure of Blue and Yellow Line stations south of Reagan National Airport for those returning to work post-Labor Day. DASH Bus (Fare Free) Line 35: Service between Van Dorn Metro, Yoakum Pkwy, Beauregard St, and Pentagon Metro Line 103:  Service between Braddock Metro, Russell Rd, Glebe Rd, and Pentagon Metro Line 104: Service between Braddock Metro, Cameron Mills Dr, Parkfairfax, and Pentagon Metro   OmniRide/PRTC Route D-100: Service between Dale City and Downtown Washington Route L-100: Service between Lake Ridge and Downtown Washington Route D-200: Service between Dale City, Pentagon, and Rosslyn/Ballston Route L-200: Service between Lake Ridge, Pentagon, and Crystal City Route D-300: Service between Dale City, Pentagon, and Washington Navy Yard RS South Route 1: Service between Triangle, Dumfries, Woodbridge, Pentagon, and Downtown Washington MC Montclair: Service between Montclair, Pentagon, and Downtown Washington   Reagan National Airport (DCA) Traveler Information: Free Shuttle Service: Travel options from the six closed stations: Yellow Line Local customers should transfer to the Blue Line Local at King St-Old Town Station. Phase Two Travel Options-Oct. 23, 2022 - May 2023 Free Shuttle Service: Metro will continue to provide three limited-stop shuttles crossing the Potomac River during weekday rush hours only.   VA-DC Shuttle 3: Mt. Vernon-Potomac Park (former 11Y Route) (5:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. and 3:10 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.)Service between Mt. Vernon, Alexandria, and Potomac Park every 20 minutes. Peak direction service only. Peak direction is toward Washington, DC in the morning and toward Virginia in the afternoon The shuttle stops at several locations in Alexandria along the George Washington Parkway, including Huntington Point, Franklin Street, King Street, and Pendleton Street. In Washington, D.C., stops are near the McPherson Square Station at 14th and I Streets, NW, and near the Farragut West Station at 19th and I Streets Rail Service: All stations will reopen, and service will resume south of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Station Yellow Line stations will be served by the Blue or Green lines If there are any changes or updates regarding these alternative travel options I will be sure to let you know in a timely manner. Thank you for your flexibility during this time as we continue to better transportation in our community.

Weekly Column: Working for a Safer, More Efficient Transportation System

August 1, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in this week's Mt. Vernon Gazette in the week of August 1, 2022.    Working for a Safer, More Efficient Transportation System This is an update on several important transportation projects underway in our area, including the U.S. 1 Speed Study, undergrounding utilities on U.S. 1, the I-495 Southside Express Lanes Study, and the Youngkin Administration’s reallocation of transit funds. Since 2017, we have seen the following on U.S. 1 in Fairfax County: 1,785 crashes 1,185 injuries 15 deaths The per-lane-miles-travelled accident rate between Fort Belvoir and Hybla Valley is 70% higher than the Virginia and Fairfax County averages.  From Hybla Valley to Alexandria it is 40% higher. These are troubling numbers.  The $800 million widening of U.S. 1 and construction of bus rapid transit will bring significant safety improvements and is being engineered with lane widths assuming a 35 MPH speed limit. Last week, the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) held a public hearing to announce the preliminary results of its study to lower the speed limit on U.S. 1 during the eight years between today and the completion of U.S. 1 construction.  VDOT’s study showed that a 35 MPH speed limit would significantly improve safety and reduce a driver’s travel time on the seven-mile stretch by only 90 seconds.  VDOT is taking public comments on its website before finalizing its recommendation.                  The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors recently had their first public discussion on undergrounding utilities on U.S. 1 as part of the widening plans and examined a new utility fee to pay for the undergrounding, an outgrowth of legislation I carried in 2017 and 2019.  Over 450 Mount Vernon residents signed the petition I circulated with Delegate Paul Krizek requesting County action.   County staff expressed concern that undergrounding utilities could jeopardize funding from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA).  It is not clear to me why that concern is only now being raised since this discussion has been ongoing for over five years, but I am hopeful that Congressman Don Beyer and Senators Mark Warner and Tim Kaine can work out a solution with the FTA.                VDOT has also begun a study of adding express toll lanes on I-495 from the Springfield “Mixing Bowl” to Prince George’s County, Maryland.  When the Woodrow Wilson Bridge expansion was finalized in 2005, the extra capacity on the bridge was expressly reserved for transit, including rail.  I have serious concerns that toll lanes would permanently eliminate the possibility of rail on the bridge and cannot be accomplished without reducing the current toll-less access on the bridge’s existing ten lanes.  Additional vehicle capacity creates more vehicle-dependent, sprawling development and adds more vehicle commutes from Prince George’s County to Tyson’s Corner.  The Wilson Bridge, which carries heavy interstate traffic, is already clogged almost daily. Rail is a more prudent, forward-looking investment.                  The National Park Service instituted traffic calming measures on the south George Washington Memorial Parkway, including a “traffic diet” last year.  At the time, VDOT analyzed concerns by several constituents that the traffic diet would gridlock Fort Hunt Road predicted no impact.  This spring, VDOT analyzed new traffic data at my request and found traffic volumes on Fort Hunt Road have not changed since the Parkway traffic diet was implemented.                   Finally, many of us are concerned about the Metro system’s lack of capital investment due to insufficient government support.  The forthcoming closure of the Yellow Line Bridge over the Potomac River for eight months is the latest reminder.  Last week, we discovered that the Youngkin Administration reallocated $71 million of state transit assistance dollars into statewide road maintenance funds.  First, this means that area localities will have to make up the difference with local funds (e.g., your real estate or property tax dollars).  Second, it means that transit funds will be used to repave roads across the entire state instead of being spent here.                While road paving needs funding, I am shocked the Governor would take this action while simultaneously claiming we have $2 billion of unanticipated transportation revenues that can support a $500 million gas tax cut.  Many of us view his action as a raid on Northern Virginia transit to benefit other parts of Virginia.  We have asked staff to determine if this unilateral reallocation violates the state budget law.                It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  Please email me at scott@scottsurovell.org with your suggestions and feedback.

Sign the petition to Underground Utilities on U.S. 1

July 18, 2022
On July 26, Mt. Vernon Supervisor Dan Storck is bringing a board matter before his colleagues that would raise the funds to finally underground utilities on U.S. 1 and other revitalizations areas in Fairfax County.  His plan creates a revolving fund with revenue raised by a utility fee capped capped at $1/month and reimbursed by development proffers.  Fairfax County is the only jurisdiction in Virginia authorized to impose this fee. Supervisor Rodney Lusk supports the measure and Patch is reporting that Chairman Jeff McKay also supports funding for underground utilities on U.S. 1.   Transit-oriented development requires underground utilities.  Climate change and traffic accidents undermine Fairfax County resiliency.   VDOT has committed $15 million and Verizon has already committed to fund their $45 million cost of undergrounding on U.S. 1 if the County pays $10M for to expand the underground duct bank.  Prince William County funded underground utilities on 14-miles of U.S. 1 using local funds.  Fairfax County is significantly wealthier and can afford the same amenities, and we cannot leave this money on the table.     Underground utilities are supported by the Mount Vernon Council of Citizens and the Mount Vernon-Lee Chamber of Commerce.  Please join Delegate Paul Krizek and me in urging the County Board of Supervisors to support Supervisor Dan Storck's proposal. We will deliver all comments you make to the Board of Supervisors before their meeting. Loading…

Weekly Column: U.S. Supreme Court Puts Virginian's Safety at Risk

July 4, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in this week's Mt. Vernon Gazette in the week of July 4, 2022.    U.S. Supreme Court Puts Virginian's Safety at Risk The U.S. Supreme Court on June 23 issued a disturbing decision on guns, the New York State Rifle & Pistol Assn. v. Bruen case, which clarified the scope of firearms rules declared by the Supreme Court in a previous case, D.C. v. Heller, decided in 2008. This is yet another disappointing decision from that court, like the one I wrote about last week,  the Dobbs case, which would severely limit women’s reproductive rights.                 Before 2008, American courts interpreted the Second Amendment as authorizing states the freedom to regulate their militias – today’s National Guard.  In Heller, the Court invalidated the District of Columbia’s handgun ban and requirement that rifles in the home be stored with trigger locks and unassembled.  This was the first time the Court found such a right existed.                 Today, New York requires every gun owner to obtain a license to own or possess a gun and to meet certain character standards.  If a person wants to carry a concealed firearm outside the home, he or she has to demonstrate “good cause,” which courts have found is “a special need for self-protection distinguishable from that of the general community” such as specific threats. New York’s concealed handgun ban dates to 1905 and it was one of only six states where concealed carry permits are discretionary.  In Virginia, concealed carry permits must be issued unless you fall within one of 18 exclusions such as a felony conviction, mental illness or have specific misdemeanor convictions.                  The NY Rifle case abandoned tests that had been settled on by the federal appellate courts and set aside the New York rule by creating a new test stipulating that all firearms rules must be “consistent with this Nation’s historical tradition . . . when the people adopted them” and consistent with the “public understanding” of the amendment.                    This “historical tradition” test is preposterous.  At the time our country was founded, it took eight to 10 seconds to put one bullet in a musket.  The effective range of an 18thcentury musket was 50 to 100 meters.  George Washington would not recognize today’s firearms, you could not carry a pistol with 33 bullets your pocket and it is unlikely James Madison ever stuffed his musket rifle in his jacket while he perused grocery store aisles.  Concealable guns did not exist.                 The Court also discussed what kinds of “sensitive places” firearm regulation might be allowed including some “government buildings,” such as courthouses, but it did not clarify the scope. Given this discussion, Virginia’s rules prohibiting firearms on school property, in Richmond’s Capitol Square or in state government buildings could be at issue.                 In 2020, I helped pass several historic laws that could be at issue because of this case: ·         Universal background checks; ·         “Red Flag” laws allowing police to seize guns from mentally unstable people in an emergency; ·         Allowing only one handgun purchase per month; and ·         Allowing localities to regulate firearms on government property and at government-permitted events.   I was especially proud to carry the local authority bill after several men from Hopewell, Virginia, carried AR-15 rifles around the Alexandria Farmer’s Market while my father and son tried to buy a baguette and ham biscuits.  Since then, many Virginia localities have adopted ordinances prohibiting firearms in government centers, libraries, local parks and during parades, protests or other government-permitted events.  All of these ordinances are now at risk.  Background checks, red flag laws and gun purchase limits did not exist in 1776 and I have no idea what the Supreme Court thinks the “historical record” says about these rules.                  The Court has also created this new legal regime out of thin air.  It effectively requires legislators and judges to become historians.  History is often written by the victors, filled with the period’s prejudices and interpretation is subject of debate.  Law schools do not teach historical analysis and our system is wholly unprepared for this new “legal test” which is going to result in a legal feeding frenzy which is one reasons courts often avoid overruling precedents.  Confidence in the Supreme Court is at an all-time low today because today’s Court operates more as a legislature instead of nine impartial jurists who follow the U.S. Constitution or law enacted by democratic legislatures. 

Weekly Column: The U.S. Supreme Court Decision Threatens Women’s Fundamental Rights

June 26, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of June 26, 2022. The U.S. Supreme Court Decision Threatens Women’s Fundamental RightsLast week the U.S. Supreme Court issued three very important decisions: Carson v. Maikin, New York Rifle & Pistol Assn v. Bruen and Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Org. (Dobbs).  The Carson case relates to taxpayer funding of religious schools.  NY Rifle affects firearm violence prevention.  Dobbs eviscerates a woman’s right to make her own healthcare decisions.  This column addresses the Dobbs decision.  I will discuss NY Rifle next week, Carson and the Governor’s budget amendments in future columns.               The Dobbs case overruled the landmark Roe v. Wade decision which has been the law of the land since January 22, 1973.  That decision held that the right to privacy embodied in various amendments in the U.S. Constitution’s Bill of Rights gave women a constitutional right to make their own healthcare decisions.  Justice Samuel Alito wrote that the Roecase was wrongly decided and should no longer stand.                  The Dobbs decision does not change Virginia law -- yet.  In Virginia, abortion is legal and in 2020 we even repealed a series of restrictions on a woman’s right to make this decision, limits put in place between 2010 and 2019, including requiring an external ultrasound and a picture of the ultrasound’s results given to the woman, requiring a 24-hour wait after obtaining the ultrasound, the provision of medically inaccurate information, and revoking a mandate to the Board of Health to unnecessarily regulate abortion clinics like hospitals.                 Today, a Virginia woman may obtain an abortion in the state without restriction during her pregnancy’s first two trimesters or during the third trimester if three medical doctors certify that the pregnancy will lead to the woman’s death or “substantially and irremediably impair the mental or physical health of the woman.”                After the Supreme Court’s decision, Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin announced that he will propose legislation to ban all abortions after the fifteenth week of pregnancy.  Another Senator has announced that he will introduce legislation to state that life begins at conception.   These bills will not pass the current Senate Education and Health Committee, but after the 2023 elections, if the membership and control of the State Senate changes, Virginia’s laws could be significantly modified or repealed.                 I support a woman’s right to make her own healthcare decisions.  In 2020, I even introduced legislation to codify Roe v. Wade, to put that policy into Virginia’s laws.  Senator Dick Saslaw introduced legislation to start the process of placing Roe in the Constitution of Virginia.  We withdrew our own bills at the request of several abortion rights organizations who did not want the legislation to be presented for various reasons.  The current composition of the General Assembly along with Governor Youngkin’s views make it impossible to pass these bills today, but that could change after 2023 or 2025 when we could try again.                  I cannot convey how disturbed I am by the Supreme Court’s decisions.  While past precedents have fallen before, the Court has never taken away a constitutional right.  Americans rely on the Court to follow our Constitution and the law through reliance upon precedent and incremental change.  Last week, the Court inappropriately behaved like a legislature.                  Five of the six justices who signed on to Dobbs and the other two opinions were nominated by presidents who did not win the American popular vote.  All six told Congress that Roe was settled precedent in their confirmation hearings.   One was confirmed after the U. S. Senate refused to hold confirmation hearings six months before an election.  Three were confirmed after the Republican majority changed internal rules and exempted Supreme Court nominations from the filibuster.   All were confirmed by U. S.  Senators representing a minority of America’s population.                  The Court’s legitimacy derives from the public’s trust, that the public believes that the court bases its opinions on the law and not on a judge’s personal opinions or religious beliefs.  This week’s decisions have eviscerated public confidence and will further inflame the divisions that have plagued our country for the last five years.                  I will do everything I can to protect the ability of Virginia’s women to have access to contraception and make healthcare decisions without government interference.  It is an honor to serve as your state senator. 

Weekly Column: Historic Investment In K-12 Education

June 6, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of June 7, 2022.                 Last week, I wrote about some of the local effects of the bipartisan budget agreement that we sent to the Governor last week.  This week I will write about some of the broader issues addressed in the budget.                First, I was not pleased with the tax cuts which I believe are short-sighted.  The budget contains several other priorities I do not support such as a new $100 million “college laboratory school” program and new funds for school resource officers, but bipartisanship requires compromise.                    The overall budget is about $180 billion over a two-year period or biennium.  The General Fund portion of the budget which we have the most discretion around totals about $59 billion over two years.  It is balances and contains a constitutionally-mandated $1.1 billion deposit to our “Rainy Day Fund” which is now projected to total $3.8 billion by FY2023 as required by the Constitution of Virginia.  It also contains a $750 million deposit against our $15 billion unfunded retirement liability with the Virginia Retirement System.                The Budget contains a number of tax cuts which reduced available revenue by over $4 billion.  Specifically, it reduced revenues by $1.6 billion by increasing the standard deduction to $8,000 for individuals and $16,000 for joint filers.  It eliminates the state sales tax on food for human consumption and personal hygiene products at a cost of $372 million but leaves the 1% local option sales tax that funds K-12 in place.  The budget also contains rebates of $250 and $500 for single and married tax filers which will cost $1.0 billion.   It also makes the Virginia Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) partially refundable at a cost of $315 million and exempts military retirement pay from state income taxes in $10,000 increments starting in 2022 up to $40,000 in 2025.                 The budget contains historic investments in K-12 education including the state share of teacher pay increases of 5% each year and $1,000 bonuses for each school employee.  It partially eliminates the cap on state support for non-teaching personnel that has been in place since 2010 and contains state funded teacher recruitment bonuses of up to $5,000 per position.                It also contains a new $1.0 billion school modernization fund which directs funds to localities through three separate streams.  School construction has historically been a locally-funded activity and many conservative areas have refused to raise taxes to keep up with maintenance.                  Higher education received over $200 million of additional support for in-state tuition, financial aid, but the state is still only funding in-state student tuition at 50% of historic levels.  Several universities have kept tuition flat in light of this.                 The bill increases Health and Human Services funding by $1.4 billion including investments which will reduce our Medicaid Waiver Waiting List for developmentally and intellectually disabled persons.  It provides $86 million in new funding to raise personal care rates for personal attendants and $85 million for increased dental insurance reimbursements so more dentists will take Medicaid funded dental patients.  It raises the salaries of state mental health workers to the 50th percentile with salary increases averaging around 37%.  Our mental health system has been unable to keep up with demand or retain employees.  It also funds a state reinsurance program for our state healthcare exchange which will reduce insurance premiums for individuals purchasing their insurance from the exchange.                The budget contains $47 million to fund local police departments like Fairfax and Prince William County, about $70 million for raises to our Sheriffs, and $113 million for raises with the Virginia State Police and our correctional workers.  It also funds raises for state employees ranging between 10-15% over two years along with $1,000 one-time bonuses.                Finally, it also contains funds to widen I-64 to four lanes between Richmond and Williamsburg and creates a new State Trails Office with $41 million to develop major trails in the Commonwealth.  We also authorized $1.0 billion of capital improvements at our Western Hemisphere leading the Port of Virginia.  The remaining transportation budget is programmed by the Commonwealth Transportation Board.                It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  As always, you can reach me at scott@scottsurovell.org.  

Weekly Column: You Can't Always Get What You Want

June 1, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of May 31, 2022.                On Wednesday of this week, I cleared my trial calendar and headed to Richmond to vote for the bipartisan conference report on our $188 billion state budget.  The compromise was a mixed bag.  This week, I will write about some local priorities in the budget.  Next week, I will write about the coming tax cuts and some of the broader investments that benefit the entire Commonwealth.                 First, the Commonwealth’s current fiscal picture appears healthy but I have serious concerns that our excess revenues are largely driven by $5 Trillion of federal stimulus monies that have been pumped into our economy instead of solid underlying economic fundamentals.  It is very dangerous to reset tax rates assuming revenues that could vanish when the stream of borrowed money fizzles out.                    The budget appropriates an additional $214 million for Fairfax County Public Schools, $219 million for Prince William County Public Schools, and $78 million for Stafford County Public Schools.  The state is now sending Fairfax County, $468 million more per year than the first budget that was adopted when I was elected in 2010.  These funds will go a long way to ensure our teachers are paid fairly as long as the our localities match the state funding consistent with progressive Virginia policy.                Last year, Senator Adam Ebbin, Delegate Paul Krizek, Delegate Mark Sickles and I secured $2 million in the state budget to help defray the cost of purchasing River Farm which was under threat of development.  Now that the threat has been eliminated, I proposed budget language to repurpose that money to provide public access improvements, education opportunities, viewing platforms and shoreline stabilization which was included in the final budget.  It would not have happened without a team effort and will pay dividends for decades.                    Water service to the Town of Quantico has been a long standing battle between the Town and Marine Corps Base Quantico.  My proposal to use $17 million of funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (APRA) to connect the Town to the Prince William County Public Service Authority water system was included.  The amendments also restored many water quality priorities I secured in the Governor’s and Senate’s budget including $3 million for stormwater mitigation in the Town of Dumfries and $300,000 of stormwater remediation in the Town of Occoquan which will help clean the Potomac River.                  Delegate Krizek, Delegate Sickles, Senator Ebbin and I also secured $400,000 of ongoing funding for Good Shepherd Housing’s to continue to provide housing, emergency services, children's services, budgeting, counseling and other resources for low-income families.  Good Shepherd has found this additional funding to be crucial – even in our raging economy where our recovery has been uneven.                 I was also able to pass and secure nearly $400,000 of funding to conduct a bipartisan autopsy of the Commonwealth’s pandemic response.  This pandemic was (hopefully) a once-in-a-century opportunity to test Virginia’s emergency and pandemic response systems.  There are many lessons to be learned about not just the pandemic but also our way of life.  We all received a crash course in remote meetings, vaccine distribution, vaccine mitigation and other practices that can pay us long-term dividends.  We tested our stockpiles and state of emergency statutes, and learned exactly which workers are essential and must continue working no matter how risky it is.  We need to continue our discussions in a post-pandemic environment.                While the budget has some important local priorities, it also contained major tax cuts and investments.  Next week, I will discuss that along with funding I did not support along with major missed opportunities.  As The Rolling Stones sang, "You can't always  get what you want, but if you try, sometimes you get what you need."  I voted “yes” to reach a bipartisan compromise.                   It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  If you have any feedback, you can reach me at scott@scottsurovell.org.   

2022 Little Hunting Creek Cleanup!

March 23, 2022
  Mark your calendars to join me, Delegate Paul Krizek and Friends of Little Hunting Creek for our annual creek cleanup! Details are as follows: 2022 LITTLE HUNTING CREEK CLEAN UPAPRIL 30TH9 AM - 11 AMRSVP: bit.ly/CreekCleanup2022 Little Hunting Creek is one of the most severely degraded streams in Fairfax County.  In 2007, it was named “Fairfax County’s Trashiest Stream” by Fairfax County who spent over $50,000 of taxpayer funds removing trash. In our 12 years of creek cleanups, we have removed over 200 shopping carts, over 500 bags of trash, over a dozen bikes, multiple car sears and a .22 caliber rifle. We will have two sites staged for the event: Janna Lee Avenue Little Hunting Creek Bridge:  From Route 1 (at the intersection with Mount Vernon Memorial Highway), turn west onto Buckman Rd., right on Janna Lee Ave to the bridge over Little Hunting Creek. Click here to view this site on Google Maps Mount Vernon Shopping Plaza Near Sherwin-Williams Paint Store: From Route 1, turn N on Fordson Rd, the cleanup site is in the concrete channel adjacent to a Sherwin-Williams store in the NE corner of Mount Vernon Plaza. Enter from Fordson Rd., directly across from Mamma’s Kitchen (7601 Fordson Rd.) Click here to view this site on Google Maps As residents of Mount Vernon, we have a responsibility to improve our natural environment and protect the health of our local watershed. Volunteering is a great opportunity for young adults to spend time outside, gain community service hours and learn about their local ecosystem. Please note that all volunteers are strongly encouraged to wear rainboots or sneakers. Additionally, we will be providing water, light snacks and pizza for all those who come out and volunteer! If you are interested in attending, please RSVP so my team can be sure to provide enough food and supplies: RSVP After the cleanup, you are invited to join me at Cinco De Surovell at Fort Hunt Park at 1 pm! I hope to see you there.

Weekly Column: Session Ends - Budget Is Pending

March 14, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of March 14, 2022. Session Ends - Budget Is Pending Last week, state legislators completed the 2022 General Assembly session and 18 of the 27 bills I introduced are now on their way to the Governor.  Unfortunately, we were not able to reach an agreement on a state budget, on two state Supreme Court justices or on a commissioner for the State Corporation Commission and will have a special session.                Last week, I served on 16 conference committees charged with working out compromises on some of our most difficult bills to reconcile. Unfortunately, the House of Delegates unexpectedly killed one of my bills to generate more bike and pedestrian solutions.  We have a massive backlog of unfunded pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure projects in Northern Virginia - especially in eastern Northern Virginia which were built before County land use rules required sidewalks or bike lanes on roads.  There is also no meaningful funding stream under which these projects are competitive so planners do not even develop or seek significant projects.   U.S. 1’s forthcoming $1 billion redesign, which will include a median dedicated bus rapid transit lane, dual sidewalks and multiuse paths, will be a bike and pedestrian magnet, but few of the roads connecting to U.S. 1 have the bike or pedestrian infrastructure to serve the project.  The Washington Area Bicyclists Association recently predicted that we need to invest $1 billion in cycling infrastructure in the D.C. metropolitan area over the next 20 years to meet minimum demand.                  I introduced SB251 to require the Virginia Department of Transportation to work with Northern Virginia localities to prepare a 20-year bicycle and pedestrian project list.  This would help us estimate future need and develop funding solutions.  The House of Delegates defeated the bill, largely because downstate legislators feared the bill would lead to less road funding for rural areas in the state.  I will try to accomplish this in other ways.                  My legislation to regulate facial recognition technology in law enforcement also passed both houses on bipartisan votes.  Last year, the General Assembly passed a ban on local police departments using the technology, but the ban did not apply to state police who can still use the technology with no restrictions, when either using it on their own or in coordination with local police.  My legislation restricts usage and creates criminal offenses for misuse.  It also prohibits facial recognition results from being stated in affidavits or search warrants and requires law enforcement officers to develop alternative corroborating evidence to link an individual to a crime.  We are fully aware that many people have concerns about this new technology so the bill also requires each law enforcement agency to publish an annual report detailing the use of facial recognition technology.  With this information, we will have more information on how it is being used and try to prevent its misuse.                  I also served on a conference committee to reconcile a bill to reverse legislation we passed last session to subject closed criminal investigations to the Freedom of Information Act.  I did not support the underlying bill, but I was put on the conference committee to try to improve it.                 I represent many crime victims in my legal practice and can appreciate the sensitivity of opening up closed files to public scrutiny.  However, accountability in police shootings and police misconduct can also be achieved with sunlight as we have learned from the Bijan Ghaisar case who was killed in Mt. Vernon by the U.S. Park Police.  The voices of victims can be heard in record disputes without giving law enforcement complete discretion on withholding files so I refused to sign the final conference report which passed both chambers on close votes.                  The budget is bogged down in a dispute over tax cuts which I do not support.  Our February revenue numbers were down compared to 2021 and I am not convinced our rosy economic growth is here to stay, especially with the instability in Ukraine, rising gas prices and inflation.  Cutting taxes means fewer revenues to support services people expect from their government.  We have many long-ignored needs to fund and reducing revenues will likely continue that neglect.  Stay tuned.                 I hope you will share your views with me at scott@scottsurovell.org. 

Yellow Line Service Disruption Across Potomac

March 9, 2022
 WMATA Announces Yellow Line Construction: Service Across the Potomac to Pause for Renovations YELLOW LINE PASSENGERS: The WMATA has announced they will be suspending Yellow Line service across the Potomac between Pentagon and L’Enfant stations for seven to eight months, starting Sept. 10th, 2022.  Per the WMATA statement: “A major rehab of the Yellow Line tunnel and bridge will begin concurrently in September. Metro’s chief engineer has identified the steel-lined tunnel near L’Enfant Plaza as the agency’s top structural priority, with repairs needed to stop water intrusion and strengthen the tunnel lining. Metro will also remove and rewire miles of critical communications cabling used by multiple jurisdictions and make repairs to the Yellow Line bridge. The project and associated bridge closure is expected to begin in September and be completed in spring 2023.”   In addition to the tunnel updates, WMATA has announced construction to connect the future Potomac Yard Station to the mainline tracks, which will be completed this fall. As the WMATA stated: “Potomac Yard Station, Sept. 10 – Oct. 22, 2022: Potomac Yard Station construction will require a six-week shutdown of rail service south of Washington National Airport station to build new tracks that “tie-in” the new station with the existing Metrorail system. Engineering, testing, and commissioning needed to integrate the track, power, communications and signal systems into the system will also be conducted during this time. This will be followed by additional testing and training to determine when service can begin.”   You can view the WMATA statement in full by clicking here. I will be sure to provide an update when the WMATA provides more information on what alternative service option(s) will be provided during the closures.

Weekly Column: Last Week On Tap: House Kills Five Bills

March 7, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of March 7, 2022. Last Week On Tap: House Kills Five Bills                Last week, Week 7 of the 2023 Regular General Assembly Session, brought major action on many bills.  This coming week, no committees can meet after Monday and the session is scheduled to end on Saturday, March 12.                The House of Delegates killed seven of my 25 remaining bills.  First, SB246 required law enforcement officers to advise a driver why they were stopped before asking for their driver’s license and vehicle registration. I introduced this bill after a constituent from Kingstowne ended up in the local news after she was stopped and charged with driving while intoxicated and after she asked why she was stopped.  She blew a 0.00% breath alcohol concentration and her case dismissed, but the entire situation was avoidable.  This policy is consistent with Virginia law enforcement accreditation standards, Virginia State Police and Fairfax County Police policies, but the Virginia Sheriffs Association opposed it and a House committee voted the bill down on a party-line vote.                 The same constituent was also encouraged to file a police complaint,  which she did, but when her case became public the law enforcement agency claimed she had not filed anything.  A second bill required law enforcement agencies to provide a written confirmation all complaints, a practice also consistent with accreditation.  The state’s Sheriffs opposed this bill too and a House committee defeated it on a party-line vote.                Next, we passed Senator Adam Ebbin’s legislation last session that decriminalized the possession of small amounts of marijuana by adults.  This session, I introduced legislation allowing anyone currently incarcerated for marijuana distribution to seek a resentencing proceeding and all people whose sentences were enhanced due to a prior marijuana-related conviction to see a review of their sentence by the Parole Board.  A House committee killed the bill on a party-line vote.                Fourth, the COVID-19 Pandemic spotlighted the sacrifice and vulnerability of our front-line healthcare, grocery store and other workers who kept working and because of the nature of their jobs, could not work from home.  I carried SB352 with Delegate Candi King which required most healthcare and grocery store employers to provide 30 hours of sick leave per year to these heroes who also lost many colleagues.  Front-line workers should not have to choose between going to work sick where they can spread illness and their paycheck.  It died in committee on a party-line vote.                In 1969, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision that allows police officers to lie to suspects in an effort to obtain a confession.  However, multiple studies show that juveniles do not have the sophistication of adults, are more susceptible deception, are more deferential to authority than adults which can result in false confessions and wrongful convictions.  I carried legislation similar to a bill introduced by Delegate Sally Hudson to heighten the government’s burden in such cases, but it died on a party-line vote in a House committee.                Finally, I also carried legislation to clean up and clarify some inconsistencies in our rules relating to the sealing of convictions and expungement of acquittals in connection with the landmark legislation I passed with Delegate Charniele Herring last year.  A House committee rejected it on a party-line vote with little discussion.                Nearly all of my other bills are awaiting the Governor’s signature. A few  will go into a conference committee for negotiation and final resolution.  The House and Senate budget negotiators have started meeting, but when the available revenues are $3 billion apart, it is virtually impossible to negotiate.  We may need a special session to resolve the differences.                Over 250 constituents have completed my constituent survey.  Thus far, 91% support extending the Yellow Line to Woodbridge, 87% would like to see Fairfax County match our state funds to provide teachers a 5% pay raise, 76% support underground utilities on U.S. 1, and funding priorities should be secondary education, mental health care and transportation, while the top issue is climate change.  Please provide your opinions on the Commanders football stadium, reproductive choice, firearm violence prevention and marijuana legalization.  You can complete your version at www.scottsurovell.org/survey.  

Weekly Column: Senate and House Set Up Fight Over $3 Billion Tax Cut

March 2, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 28, 2022. Senate and House Set Up Fight Over $3 Billion Tax Cut                  In the sixth week of the General Assembly Session each chamber offered their proposed budgets.  Each chamber’s budget is very different.                First, I was able to secure several changes to the budget that are important to our community.  The Senate Finance Committee included $10 million in the budget to fund the Phase II improvements at Widewater State Park.  Phase II will include a new visitor center, new trails, a loop road, parking areas, and picnic areas.  I have been fighting for this for five years and I am working with Delegate Candi King and Delegate Tara Durant to ensure the House of Delegates will agree to fund it.                Next, the Senate Budget includes language repurposing $2 million for River Farm previously secured by Delegate Paul Krizek and Senator Adam Ebbin by allowing it to be spent on public access improvements on the property.  This will help River Farm truly become a public asset.                I also worked with Delegate Paul Krizek to secure $250,000 in both chambers’ budget to help Good Shepherd Housing continue to provide services to family who received Temporary Aid to Needy Families aid.  The Senate also included $50 million in new financial funding for Pell Grant eligible college students at universities with smaller endowments such as James Madison University, George Mason University, Longwood, Radford and Mary Washington.                 Governor Northam previously included $17 million in his budget to connect the Town of Quantico to public water service.  This has been a major source of friction between the town and Marine Corps Base Quantico and I am pleased it was left in both budget.                He also included $3 million and $300,000 in stormwater grants for the Town of Dumfries and the Town of Quantico, but these were removed in the Senate.  I am hopeful they will be restored during the budget negotiations.    More globally, the House Budget relies on over $3 billion of tax cuts whereas the Senate Budget fulfills our obligation to pass a balanced budget by only cutting state tax on groceries.  Without these tax cuts, the Senate Budget provides funding for a 5% raise on teacher salaries.  The Senate Budget also provides about $500 million to help fund the state’s $26 billion school maintenance deficit which mostly exists outside of Northern Virginia.  It also provides $1 billion towards the state $6 billion shortfall in the Virginia Retirement System.                 The Senate Budget also provides a 5% raise for all state employees and a one-time $1,000 bonus.  It also includes $388 million in new funding for public safety including raises for law enforcement.  It provides $85 million to pay down the $300 million maintenance backlog in our state parks, funds $289 million of improvements at the Virginia Port Authority which provides goods for nearly every big box store in Virginia, and also over $300 million for the Virginia Water Quality Improvement Fund.  The Senate Budget also fulfills our constitutionally required Rainy Day Fund deposit which would leave $3.9 billion available for the next downturn.                 These budgets are substantially apart due to the House of Delegates irresponsible decision to cut taxes.  Our nation is currently experiencing 7% inflation which is helping to generate the revenue surpluses and we are not even providing pay raises to allow our teachers, police and other government employees pay raises that keep up with that.  At this time, it is not clear how we will reach a compromise.                We still have two Supreme Court vacancies that we need to fill and a vacancy on the State Corporation Commission (SCC).  Most people have never heard of the SCC, but it decides how much you pay for electricity, water, gas, all types of insurance, regulates banks, credit unions and railroads, and runs our state healthcare exchange.  We have two weeks to figure these out.                Please consider completing my constituent survey seeking your feedback on important issues this session.  You can complete it at www.scottsurovell.org/survey.  It is an honor to serve as your state senator.

Weekly Column: Juvenile Deception, Facial Recognition and Medical Record Transparency

February 23, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 21, 2022. Juvenile Deception, Facial Recognition and Medical Record Transparency                The sixth week of the General Assembly brought us to “Crossover” – the moment when each chamber must finish work on bills originating in each chamber and we begin work on bills coming from the other side.                Twenty-five of my twenty-seven bills were passed by the Senate and will now be heard in the House of Delegates.  On the last day of session, I defended eight bills on the floor of the Senate alone.  I will discuss several in this column that I have not covered in prior columns.                 In 1969, the Supreme Court of the United States held that it was constitutionally permissible for law enforcement to lie to suspects during interrogation to gain information for prosecution.  Several states have questioned the fundamental fairness of using this tactic to juveniles who are not as sophisticated and are more susceptible to persuasion than adults.  False confessions are involved in about thirty-five percent of wrongful convictions and there is a plethora of cases involving juveniles who wrongfully confessed.  My legislation would prohibit law enforcement from using deception tactics during a custodial interrogation of a juvenile and shift the burden of showing a confession was voluntary to the government if these tactics were used.  It passed the Senate on a bipartisan 26-14 vote. I also carried a bill that will allow the limited use of facial recognition technology to develop leads in criminal investigations and for use in specific community welfare situations.  Last year, we passed legislation prohibiting facial recognition from being used in Virginia law enforcement due to concerns about accuracy across racial subgroups.  The Fairfax County Police Department had previously used this technology over 12,000 times with no false positives.  More recently, you may have read about the “shopping cart killer” who was arrested on U.S. 1 near the Penn Daw Wal-Mart pushing two dead bodies in containers in a shopping cart.  He was later linked to three other murders across the country.  Facial recognition companies have additional information about him, but the FCPS is prohibited from obtaining or using it by statute.  This technology can also be used to identify individuals without identification such as lost adults with dementia, people unable to provide information due to medical emergencies such as strokes or concussions, or dead bodies.  Police cannot use this technology even if no foul play is suspected.  The National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) has begun a program that now certifies many facial recognition technologies as being 98-99% accurate with minor deviations across racial subgroups.  Many are being used in national security applications, for air travel, and for trusted-traveler programs such as Global Entry run by U.S. Border and Customs Control.  My legislation would allow it to be used for specific investigations and community welfare incidents, but not for general surveillance or monitoring.  It passed the Senate on a bipartisan vote.                I am also working with the Virginia Chapter of the Humane Society on legislation to modernize Virginia Law relating to the sexual abuse of animals.  While Virginia currently prohibits beastiality, it does not have criminal sanctions for individuals who traffic in animals for sexual abuse or for the manufacturing or possession of “animal porn” which has all been shown to have strong correlation with child sexual abuse and other sex crimes.  Detectives also testified at our hearing regarding suspects destroying child pornography during raids, but separately storing or keeping their animal porn because they knew it was not illegal.  My bill passed the Senate unanimously.                 Medical records have become electronic over the last two decades.  However, when a doctor makes a change on your chart, you can no longer see the scratches to show the change and the edits are often invisible without careful inspection.  I carried legislation requiring medical providers to produce the audit history for medical records so that patient can quickly see any changes made to their contemporaneous medical records.                Next week, we move on to the budget and action on legislation that has crossed over.  Please complete my constituent survey at www.scottsurovell.org/survey and if you have feedback, send me an email at scott@scottsurovell.org.  

Weekly Column: Last Week in Richmond: 25 Bills Moving

February 16, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 14, 2022.  Last Week in Richmond:  25 Bills Moving   In the General Assembly, the first week of February is always the week we deal with difficult and controversial legislation and this year was no different.                 I have introduced 27 bills and 25 appear headed for passage to the House of Delegates, one was tabled and referred for study at my request and one was killed. That bill was intended to make serving in the General Assembly more realistic for people whose employers would not be supportive of service in a part-time legislature like ours.                  On a 35 to five vote, the Senate approved a bill I am carrying with Delegate Israel O’Quinn to reduce Virginia’s methane emissions. Methane is a planet-warming greenhouse gas that is 85x more potent that another greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide.  I am hopeful that the bill will incentivize utilities like Washington Gas to work with local sewage authorities to recover methane generated at sewage plants and landfills so that it can be captured and used instead of generating more methane from hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” for natural gas to heat homes and power buses, stoves and water heaters.                 We also considered legislation addressing in-person learning and masking in schools.  In the last month, major medical journal articles have reported that this pandemic is moving into an endemic phase and will persevere in ways similar to the common cold or the flu.  Last week, Dr. Anthony Fauci, an infectious disease expert, confirmed that we are moving into an endemic and Fairfax County Public Schools announced a new policy that will effectively end the mask mandate once Fairfax County achieves certain metrics. In addition, the Prince William County School Board Chairman Babur Lateef said the mandate needs to end.  The governors of Oregon, California, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Delaware are moving away from universal masking mandates while the Biden administration is exploring adjustments to masking guidance.  Last week, we debated an amendment to one bill, SB 739, to standardize state masking optional policies.  I voted for the amendment to include a mask policy in the bill that would be effective July 1, 2022.  Several constituents have asked about my vote.  Unfortunately, our schools, school boards and communities are being torn apart because some are politicizing public health issues, instead of respecting health experts.  It is virtually impossible to have a rational discussion about the effectiveness of masks, quarantines and even vaccines across party lines.  Virginia school boards cannot even agree on what the Center for Disease Control guidance says.  In many cases, Democratic-led school boards are concluding that mandatory masks are required and Republican-led school boards are saying that they are not.  Our school systems need clarity on this issue and we need to get school boards, teachers and children out of the political crossfire.  As a state senator, I have to vote on policy for the entire state, not just Northern Virginia.  I also want state legislators to be at the table in this discussion after our current masking law expires on August 1, 2022, instead of creating more uncertainty by ceding the issue solely to Governor Youngkin, schools boards and courts and perpetuating a climate in which school board members face death threats and citizens carrying firearms to local school board meetings.  I voted against the bill final passage because it restricted school boards’ ability to mitigate pandemic emergencies in perpetuity.  Attacks on medical science have caused more Virginians than ever to doubt vaccines and challenge vaccine policy.  No one knows when the next pandemic will arrive or whether we will start seeing localized breaks of measles or other viruses.  Unfortunately, Governor Youngkin added an emergency clause to the bill making it effective March 1 instead of July 1, refused to add a sunset provision to the bill, and three of my Democratic colleagues crossed over to support it.  I remain opposed and expect litigation to ensue once again.  It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  I hope you will share your views with me at scott@scottsurovell.org.   

Week Four: Bills Moving in Richmond & Retail Marijuana Under Discussion

February 10, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 1, 2022. Week Four:  Bills Moving in Richmond & Retail Marijuana Under Discussion In the fourth week of the General Assembly’s session, several of my 27 bills advanced. The Senate passed my resolution to create a two-year study between the House and Senate to evaluate the state’s COVID-19 pandemic response.   If adopted by the House of Delegates, this will be a major, two-year evaluation with recommendations about lessons learned. One of my bills would place our projected $1 billion surplus from the Virginia 529 Plan into an endowment fund to create 2,000 full-ride scholarships for female and minority students who would have been denied admission to Virginia universities before 1900 because of gender and race-based discrimination practices.  I asked that the bill be tabled and referred to an ongoing study about the surplus.  Various Senate committees have favorably acted on all of my other bills so far.   The Senate passed my bill to make it easier for divorcing spouses to divide retirement plans administered by the Virginia Retirement System.  We also passed my legislation to create a clear runway for companies to invest in large-scale, organic waste digesters that can make renewable biomethane.  This approach can replace methane extracted through hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” a natural gas extraction method which I have helped prohibit east of Interstate 95 in Virginia.   My legislation to establish a new charter for the Town of Occoquan received a unanimous vote and is now in the House of Delegates.                 We had our first public hearing on legislation to set the parameters for the retail sale of marijuana. This is a complicated situation.  Under the bill we are considering, there will be a three-tiered system to separate ownership between cultivators, processors and retailers that will maximize the development of Virginia businesses and community capital.  However, the details around the system are fraught with complexities and choices.                There is no census on a tax rate that will generate sufficient revenue while avoiding sufficient incentives to continue a black market.  There is no agreement on how the revenues would be used.  The Senate Democratic Caucus would like the revenues in part to be invested in a way to help alleviate the disproportionate impact that criminalization of marijuana offenses has had in the state.  There is also no consensus on a transition period to the new retail licensing system.  Today, Virginians can legally purchase marijuana from five licensees, such as Beyond Hello in Manassas, if they have a recommendation a medical provider.  The medical marijuana companies would like to sell marijuana at the retail level without the medical recommendation while others would like to see vertically-integrated hemp growers authorized to sell marijuana until the final retail system is in place. We are also debating how to address fate of 500 Virginians currently imprisoned for marijuana distribution and several thousand more who received enhanced sentences for other offenses due to marijuana-related sentence enhancements.  I am carrying legislation with Senator Louise Lucas to create both resentencing and parole board avenues to seek a modification of sentence.  This will be a complex negotiation and I am optimistic we will make progress this year to finalize this issue so we can move on to other issues.                The Senate approved my legislation to create a seventh Circuit Court judgeship in Prince William County.  Prince William County, Manassas and Manassas Park have grown by nearly 50,000 people or about 10 percent since judicial caseloads were last evaluated and wait times to go to court are significantly higher there than in most other Northern Virginia jurisdictions.  If the House of Delegates approves this bill, our delegation will nominate a new person to be a judge within the next two weeks.                I will be available online on February 12 at 1 p.m. for my eastern Prince William County town hall meeting with Senator Jeremy McPike and Delegates Luke Torian and Candi King.   I hope you will join us and share your views.                  The next week of the legislature’s session is traditionally the time for final hearings on some of the most difficult bills.  I always appreciate hearing your views and suggestions.  Please email me at scott@scottsurovell.org. 

Weekly Column: Named Chairman of Two Subcommittees & Bills Are Moving

February 2, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 1, 2022. Named Chairman of Two Subcommittees & Bills Are Moving     In the state legislature’s third week in session, the Senate passed and sent to the House of Delegates five of my bill and many of my other bills advanced.     First, I was named the Chairman of two different subcommittees.  The Senate Commerce & Labor Committee Chairman created a Labor & Employment Subcommittee which I will chair and consider 11 bills focused on workforce issues.  I was also named the Chairman of the Criminal Law Subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee which will consider 19 bills addressing criminal justice issues.       We have spent much of the last two weeks rejecting legislation that attempts to undo much of the progress we made over the last two years, policies like making it easier to vote, modernizing workers’ rights, requiring a transition to cleaner energy, making Virginia a more welcoming state and reforming our criminal justice system.  We have disturbing bills coming up this week to reinstate capital punishment and to require the kinds of election audits conducted in states like Arizona and Michigan.  These measures will not pass.     We passed my legislation requiring law enforcement to advise drivers why the officer has stopped a driver before asking for the driver's license and registration.  Unfortunately, the debate became politicized and it passed on a party line, but I am hopeful that we can have further discussion about the anxiety many drivers feel during traffic stops and how that can be alleviated by explaining the basis for the stop.     I am working on two bills to curb Virginia’s methane emissions.  Two months ago, President Biden attended the United Nations Climate Change Summit called “COP26” in Glasgow, Scotland, and emerged with a pledge to reduce American methane emissions by 30 percent.  Methane is 85 times more potent than carbon dioxide at capturing the greenhouse gas that is warming the planet at unsustainable rates.  I am carrying two bills to address this.     First, I introduced a bill to clarify the legal treatment of the byproduct of organic waste digestion.  One way to create methane without hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” natural gas, a greenhouse gas, is to put organic materials in a digester so it can decompose in an enclosed environment.  The end products are methane or “biomethane” which can be used interchangeably with fracked methane.  The residual sludge can be applied to farm fields.  However, the end product does not contain consistent nutrient content so it needs to be sold and labelled as a soil amendment like vermiculite instead of fertilizer.  My bill passed out of committee unanimously.     Second, I am also working with Virginia’s five natural gas companies on legislation which would allow  the companies to purchase biogas from composing facilities, landfills or other composting facilities and sell it to consumers.  It would also allow companies to obtain credit for methane reduction by capturing “fugitive methane” from leaky pipelines, compressor stations or closed wells.  The legislation basically gets methane out of the atmosphere and into the pipes where it can be used to power your furnace, hot water heater or stove top.  A Senate committee will consider the bill next week.     The Senate Rules Committee approved my legislation to conduct what I am calling a “COVID-19 Pandemic Autopsy.”  This is the first pandemic our government has responded to since 1918 and our existing rules and systems adjusted, but there are always lessons to be learned.  Our state-of-emergency laws are designed for short-term events like hurricanes and snowstorms.  Many of us feel that the General Assembly should have a role in addressing more extended situations.  We need to examine the responses of our education, health, regulatory and legal systems and look for lessons learned, approaches we need to keep and changes we need to continue to make.     The next ten legislative days will be some of the busiest we face as we approach “Crossover” – the day that we must complete work on all legislation in our respective chambers and switch to work on bills from the other chamber.  We usually save the most difficult bills for the last few days.     If you have any feedback, you can reach me at scott@scottsurovell.org. It is an honor to serve in the Virginia Senate.

Opposing Names Changes to Mt. Vernon District and Hollin Hall Precinct

February 1, 2022
Senator Scott Surovell sent the letter below to the Fairfax County Redistricting Committee which is considering changes to the names of the Mount Vernon Magisterial District and Hollin Hall Precinct. The Fairfax County Redistricting Committee is meeting on Tuesday, February 1, 2022 from 6-8 pm to consider their recommendations. Senator Surovell Opposes Mount Vernon Name Change Letter by Scott A. Surovell on Scribd

Weekly Column: Week #2: A New Governor, Bills Moving & Budget Amendments For SD36

January 25, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of January 24, 2022. Week #2: A New Governor, Bills Moving & Budget Amendments For SD36  In the second week of this year’s General Assembly, Governor Youngkin gave his State of the Commonwealth speech to a joint session of the House of Delegates and Senate and we began serious work on over 2,000 bills.                 While I was pleased that Governor Youngkin said he wants all Virginians to get vaccinated for COVID-19, supports a Chesapeake Bay cleanup and ending raw sewage discharges into the James River, he also advocated for many policies that many people of the 36th Senate District do not support, policies like charter schools and funding cuts to schools and our transportation.  Senate committees advanced several of my bills recently.  The Transportation Committee approved my legislation to require police officers to advise drivers why they have stopped the driver’s vehicle before requesting the driver’s license and registration.  When police stop a car, drivers can often become anxious and upset and believe they were not violating any law.  This happened to one of my constituents recently and her incident escalated into an arrest for driving while intoxicated.  She submitted to a breath test which showed she had no alcohol on her breath and the Commonwealth’s Attorney asked for the charges to be dropped.  The entire episode would have been avoided if the officer had told her the basis for her stop.  The full Senate will debate this bill this week. Another bill would allow child accident victims to invest proceeds from injury settlements and use the funds for college, trade school or registered apprenticeship programs in what is called Virginia’s 529 Program.  Under current law, settlements are either invested in certificates of deposit or restrictive annuities approved by a judge. Another bill I introduced would create a new Circuit Court judgeship in Prince William County.  Prince William is now the second largest jurisdiction in Virginia and it takes 18 months to get a hearing date for civil cases like family law matters, business disputes or personal injury.  All other jurisdictions in Northern Virginia address these cases in fewer than 12 months.                 The Judiciary Committee approved my legislation that extends the Supreme Court of Virginia’s judicial review program to retired judges who continue to hear cases and allows the legislature to decertify any judges who have problems.  Today, retired judges can continue to hear cases and there is no formal program to obtain objective feedback on their performance or initiate their removal.                 I also introduced several budget amendments of local interest.  I am proposing to repurpose the $2 million that Senator Adam Ebbin, Delegate Paul Krizek and Delegate Mark Sickles secured for River Farm last year to purchase River Farm and use it as a grant program to improve public access to the property.  I have requested $5 million to connect Pohick Bay Regional Park to public water and another $5.4 million to fund water and sewer lines for permanent outdoor restrooms at all Fairfax County Public School stadiums.  One of the wealthiest counties in America should have permanent restrooms at these community facilities.                I have suggested that we use funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARPA) to eliminate our $250 million state park maintenance backlog at parks like Mason Neck and general funds to complete the Phase II and Phase III buildout at Widewater State Park in Stafford County.  I have also requested $200,000 to continue Good Shepherd Housing’s services to families receiving government aid that was started this year.                 Over 70 constituents attended our Mount Vernon-Lee Town Hall on Saturday and I have town hall meetings scheduled with other delegates and senators for Lorton, Occoquan/Woodbridge and Dumfries/Montclair.  Please see www.scottsurovell.org and my Facebook and Twitter pages for more details.  I look  forward to discussing your concerns and answering your questions.                Please send me any feedback  at scott@scottsurovell.org.  It is an honor to serve you in the Virginia Senate.

Weekly Column: A New Day in Richmond and Many Challenges

January 17, 2022
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of January 15, 2021. A New Day in Richmond and Many Challenges                As the Virginia General Assembly begins its 2022 session, my 13th, I look forward to working with Governor Glenn Youngkin, the new House of Delegates leadership and other legislators to reach a consensus on the best direction for our state.               While I did not support them, I attended Governor Youngkin’s inauguration and  swearing in, along with the swearing in of Lieutenant Governor Winsome Sears and Attorney General Jason Miyares. Budgets Reflect Priorities                No matter what happens with other bills, one thing we are required to accomplish this session is to pass a budget.  Thanks to federal pandemic funds, Virginia has significant excess revenues in our two-year budget cycle that ends on June 30, 2022.  A little over half of those revenues will be appropriated to the “Rainy Day Fund” and to mandatory water quality improvement.   In the last session, we also reserved about $1.5 billion of $4.5 billion from the American Rescue Plan Act in case we had a pandemic resurgence.  We are limited to spending these funds on five categories of expenditures including water and sewer infrastructure and maintenance of outdoor assets.  I am proposing to spend some of these funds to (1) eliminate our state parks’ $225 million maintenance backlog, (2) install a public water line at Pohick Bay Regional Park to replace well service and water and sewer infrastructure, and (3) to construct permanent, outdoor restrooms at all Fairfax County public high schools.  The new two-year budget also projects significant new revenues.  The Governor is proposing a series of ill-advised tax cuts.  First, he proposes to cut our current two percent grocery tax that is dedicated solely to education and would cost Fairfax County Public Schools about $80 million per year.  The Governor also reiterated his call to suspend the $0.08 per gallon gas tax increase enacted in 2021.  His proposal would save the average Virginia driver about $4 a month, but interrupt dozens of transportation projects currently planned.  My Bills                I am carrying around 27 bills.  One creates a joint study to review the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic across all levels of government so  we can learn from our mistakes and improve our system going forward.  I am also carrying legislation to study multi-family housing regulation to ensure that Virginia’s inspection systems and condo association policies are sufficiently strong to avoid the types of collapse we saw in Florida or partial collapse that occurred at River Towers near Belleview in Fairfax County in 2016.                 The Biden Administration recently signed an agreement in at the Edinburgh, Scotland, global summit to reduce methane emissions in the U.S. by 75 percent.  Methane is 85 times more potent than carbon dioxide in trapping energy.  I have a bill to incentivize Virginia’s natural gas companies to capture loose methane from landfills or waste composting operations and sell it to consumers to remove it from the atmosphere and curtail these greenhouse gases that are warming the planet.                 Cycling and pedestrian deaths have been increasing across the country, Virginia and our local community.  At one point in 2020, three pedestrians were killed in Fairfax County one day.  One major cause of these problems is that the infrastructure in our part of Northern Virginia was designed for vehicles and not pedestrians.  While the legislature has provided significant new funding for transportation infrastructure, the focus has traditionally largely been for vehicle projects, with pedestrian or cycling improvements considered secondarily.  I have introduced a bill to require a fixed percentage of funds to be devoted to pedestrian and cycling infrastructure going forward.                  Virginia’s Supreme Court significantly revised state legislative districts including the district I currently represent.  I will discuss this in a future column.                If you have any feedback, please contact meat scott@scottsurovell.org and follow my work on Facebook and Twitter.   It is an honor to serve as your state senator.

Winter Storm Watch: What you need to know

January 14, 2022
UPDATE: 8:00 AM, 1/17/2022 VDOT Update There is no longer a Winter Weather advisory in effect, however continue to proceed with caution. Crews continue to treat roads for icy spots. Treat anything that looks wet as if it could be ice, especially bridges and overpasses. If there is snow or ice on roadways, travel is hazardous. Continue to avoid or delay trips if possible to give trucks room to work and treat icy areas. Temperatures will remain around freezing most of the day, causing potential icy conditions especially on ramps, bridges, overpasses and other elevated surfaces. UPDATE: 11:00 AM, 1/16/2022 VDOT, Natl. Weather Service Update The Winter Weather Advisory remains in effect from 1 pm this afternoon to 1 am on Monday. Expect mixed precipitation with snow accumulations of 1-3 inches and ice accumulations around one tenth of an inch. Avoid unnecessary travel. If you must travel, slow down and use caution. Roads will be slippery with the potential for black ice. Northern Virginia District crews pretreated interstates, primaries, and high-volume secondary roads, along with bridges, ramps and overpasses with brine. More than 3,800 pieces of equipment will be deployed in the Northern Virginia District Sunday morning. Residents may begin to see trucks staged in neighborhoods while awaiting the start of the snowfall. Crews will work around the clock on state-maintained roads, focusing on clearing roads that carry the most traffic first. These include interstates, primary roads, and routes connecting public safety and emergency services. Crews can then focus on neighborhoods and lower-volume roads. In areas that are expected to receive higher accumulations of snow, park in driveways or on a single side of the street to allow a wider path for plows. Wind gusts will possibly bring down trees, branches, and power lines. Tree removal crews will be deployed to remove trees from the roadway. VDOT, VA Dept. Of Emergency Management, Natl. Weather Service Update VDOT and other agencies provided an update earlier today on the storm that will move through the Commonwealth on Sunday, January 16th. Governor Northam declared a state of emergency this morning in preparation for the winter storm. Click here to read his emergency declaration The Northam administration and the incoming Youngkin administration are working closely to ensure the transition of power does not disrupt efforts to prepare for and address the storm Primary roads and interstates are currently being pretreated for the snow. All primary roads and interstates will be pretreated by tomorrow morning, January 15th at the latest The storm will come in from the southwest and move eastward. The storm is expected to affect the whole Commonwealth by 2 pm, but it may occur between 11 am and 5 pm. The current forecast shows an expected snowfall of 3-4 inches in Fairfax and Prince William County Freezing rain is likely to begin Sunday afternoon and may continue into Sunday evening. The freezing rain is likely to cause tree damage. Ice is likely to accumulate in Fairfax and Prince William County The storm system will intensify rapidly with high winds gusting up to 40 miles per hour Warm air from the east will change the snow to rain sometime Sunday afternoon. Conditions may vary widely depending on where this occurs There is a likelihood of power outages with this storm due to the potential for wet snow and ice Weather Updates Like with most weather forecasts, there’s a decent amount of uncertainty surrounding the conditions we might see on Wednesday. Some parts of the district might only get rain or freezing rain, while others might experience more severe forms of wintery participation. The National Weather Service is a great resource for monitoring weather conditions. School ClosuresClick Here For Fairfax School Closures Click Here For Prince William School Closures Important Resources Dominion Resources Power Outage Line 1-866-366-4357 Dominion Resources Storm Center Outage and Restoration Updates Northern Virginia Outages Map VDOT Street Problem Number1 (800) FOR-ROADVDOT REAL-TIME ONLINE PLOW MAP Other Resources Dominion NOVEC Washington Gas   Fairfax County Police:   703-691-2131  Prince William County:  703-792-6500Stafford County:  540-658-4400 Winter Storm Guidance Winter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days. Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.Before, during and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable. Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited. Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary. Always give snow plows the right of way. Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks! Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home. Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. Protect yourself from Frostbite! Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. Keep dry! Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing. Snow Removal Due to COVID-19 restrictions that protect the safety of plow workers, it’s possible that plowing might take longer than usual this year. To track when your neighborhood will be plowed, visit the Virginia Department of Transportation’s (VDOT) plowing website, which activates after 2 inches of snow have accumulated in your county. If you live on a private street, it is the responsibility of the developers or the homeowner’s association to arrange for the street to be cleared. Call 800-FOR-Road (800-367-7623) for information on snow removal or to inform VDOT of any snow removal problems. TTY users can call 711. While there’s no legal obligation to clear the sidewalk in front of your house, we rely on residents to help keep neighborhoods pedestrian-friendly during snowy winters. Now more than ever, we’re encouraging younger residents who are able to assist their elderly neighbors with clearing their residential sidewalks to do so in a safe and socially distanced manner. Preventing unnecessary hospitalizations due to icy conditions is especially important during the current COVID-19 pandemic.Remember to exercise caution when driving, stay home if you’re able to, and make sure you’re informed before leaving your home. The VDOT website provides guidelines for how to commute and travel safely during snowy and icy conditions. Again, if you’re able to shelter in place, that’s always the safest option.If you live in Fairfax County, the Fairfax County Emergency Information site provides up-to-date information on the forecast and how the weather could be affecting road conditions, traffic, and public transportation. If you live in Prince William County, you can access updates on weather and traffic conditions on their emergency event information site. If you live in Prince William County, more weather-related resources and updates can be found on the county website. -------------------- Stay warm, stay safe, and look out for your neighbors.

Winter Storm Warning: What you need to know

January 2, 2022
UPDATE: 11:00 PM, 1/6/22 VDOT, VA Dept. Of Emergency Management, Natl. Weather Service Update VDOT and other agencies provided an update earlier today on the storm moving through the Commonwealth tonight. Here are a few highlights: There's a 10-40% chance that Fairfax and PWC get 6+ inches This is going to be a very cold and gusty event which means there will be snow drifting and piling up but it won't be heavy so hopefully not as many trees down. Snow will be over by 8 am tomorrow morning. Interstate system is clear of snow now. Primary roads are between clear and minor blockages. Secondary streets are mostly clear or moderately snowy. Fredericksburg still has some severely blocked roads. We have over 1 million cubic yards of debris down on the roads hampering recovery effort. NoVA has over 200,000 cubic yards - mostly trees. The big ice storm last year only produced 500,000 statewide. VDOT is working to clear trees tangled in power lines and coordinating with power companies. This storm tomorrow is going to be different from Monday's. It's going to start as snow which means VDOT can pre-treat roads this time. All interstates are pre-treated. Most arterials are, too.  Pavement temps are above freezing so we shouldn't see as much ice at the outset. School Closures Fairfax County School buildings will be closed tomorrow with no virtual learning. Click Here For Fairfax School Closures Prince William County Schools are closed Code Green. Click Here for PWCS School Closures UPDATE: 10 PM, 1/5/22 VDOT Update VDOT crews are ready for snowfall and wintry precipitation forecast across northern Virginia tomorrow evening. As always, residents are asked to track the latest forecasts, plan ahead to avoid nonessential travel during winter weather, and to be aware of the potential for black ice and nightly refreeze as temperatures remain low. What's Happening Now: See the Winter Weather Advisory from the National Weather Service, with a range of snow accumulations forecast across VDOT's Northern Virginia District from late Thursday evening through Friday morning. Please monitor forecasts closely for updates. With dry conditions in the forecast until Thursday afternoon, Northern Virginia District crews will be pretreating interstates, primaries, and high-volume secondary roads, along with bridges, ramps and overpasses with brine. Brine is 77% water and 23% salt. It is sprayed on the road and when it evaporates, it leaves white lines of salt residue, or brine lines as they are commonly referred to. Brine works to prevent ice from bonding to the pavement in the first hour or so of a snowstorm. With more than 2,800 pieces of equipment, crews will work around the clock on state-maintained roads, focusing on clearing roads that carry the most traffic first. These include interstates, primary roads, and routes connecting public safety and emergency services. Crews can then focus on neighborhoods and lower-volume roads. Residents can monitor the progress of plows at www.vdotplows.org.  In areas that are expected to receive higher accumulations of snow, park in driveways or on a single side of the street to allow a wider path for plows. Reminders for Residents and Drivers: Monitor the forecast closely and prepare to stay off roads when snowfall begins, to avoid deteriorating conditions and to allow crews room to work. Plan to avoid nonessential travel overnight Sunday into midday Monday. In areas that are expected to receive higher accumulations of snow, park in driveways or on a single side of the street to allow a wider path for plows. If you must drive, ensure headlights are on, drive for the conditions, and be familiar with these winter driving tips. Monitor road conditions on www.511virginia.org or the free mobile app, or call 511 from any phone in Virginia. Learn more about snow removal by visiting virginiadot.org/snow and viewing Northern Virginia District's fact sheet. Dominion Update Dominion Energy crews continue to make progress restoring power to customers affected by Monday’s winter storm, restoring power to 30,000 customers today. Estimated restoration times have been posted and will continue to be updated. The most up-to-date information will be available at Report Outage or Emergency | Virginia | Dominion Energy, 866-DOM-HELP (866-366-4357) or through the Dominion Energy app from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.   We are tracking a cold front that will bring snow likely across Northern, Western and parts of Central Virginia between 8:00 PM tomorrow night and 6:00 AM Friday morning. Widespread 2-4 inches of accumulation looks likely for areas north and west of Richmond. Much of the global model guidance indicates that the same locations which saw the greatest snowfall early this week will again have the highest amounts. Temperature profiles during initial snow accumulation look similar to what we experienced Monday morning. The primary concern is any wet snow accumulation still on trees from the last event combined with additional accumulation from this event. The secondary concern is new wet snow in the same location as the previous event. Important Resources Federal Government Offices Federal offices in DC are Open with 3 hour delayed arrival and optional telework. Office of Personnel Management Status School Closures Fairfax County School buildings will be closed tomorrow, Jan 5, with no virtual learning. Click Here For Fairfax School Closures Prince William County Schools are closed Code Green For Jan 5. Click Here for PWCS School Closures Dominion Resources Power Outage Line 1-866-366-4357 Dominion Resources Storm Center Outage and Restoration Updates Northern Virginia Outages Map VDOT Street Problem Number1 (800) FOR-ROADVDOT REAL-TIME ONLINE PLOW MAP Other Resources Dominion NOVEC Washington Gas   Fairfax County Police:   703-691-2131  Prince William County:  703-792-6500Stafford County:  540-658-4400 UDPATE: 10 PM, 1/4/22 VDOT Update Interstate 95 northbound and southbound in Virginia is open after being closed for emergency response for most of the day, Jan. 4. All disabled vehicles have been removed from the interstate. Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), Virginia State Police (VSP) and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM) continue to work around the clock with safety being the top priority. While drivers can enter or exit I-95 northbound and southbound, travel remains hazardous throughout Stafford, Spotsylvania, and Caroline counties. Since early this morning, crews directed travelers stopped on I-95 to the nearest possible interchange between exit 104/Route 207 in Caroline County and exit 152/Dumfries in Prince William County. Once all disabled vehicles and tractor-trailers were removed through the 40-mile section of interstate, multiple passes were made with snow plows and motorgraders to remove snow and ice then treated the travel lanes with materials to safely reopen the interstate. VDOT continues to focus on primary and high-volume secondary roads before shifting to less traveled roads and subdivision streets. Most secondary routes and neighborhoods remain in severe condition, meaning snow-covered with little to no bare visible pavement showing. Drivers in the Fredericksburg area should continue to delay any unnecessary travel with dozens of roads closed with downed trees and fallen utility lines. If travel is essential, drivers should be alert to slick, icy road conditions overnight and tomorrow morning, Jan. 5. Crews will continue to work 24 hours a day until all state-maintained roads are safe for travel. Dominion Update Dominion Energy Virginia crews are safely and quickly restoring power to customers affected by Monday’s winter storm, which left pockets of heavy damage and impacted travel across Virginia. Along with a full cohort of Dominion Energy crews, support staff, and contractors, more than 800 mutual aid workers are providing assistance to ensure a swift response. Over 400,000 customers have experienced a power outage since heavy snow and high winds began impacting service early Monday morning, making this one of the five worst winter storms in Dominion Energy Virginia’s history. Significant restoration progress has been made with service restored to more than 290,000 customers as of 3 p.m. Tuesday. Many more customers will have their power restored this evening and the majority of those still without power will be restored by late Wednesday evening, with pockets of outage restorations extending into Thursday. Areas around Fredericksburg have been particularly impacted by this historic event where damage is the most severe and road conditions are treacherous, in some cases, impassable. Crews will continue restoration around the clock until all customers have service restored. Estimated restoration times will be populated on individual projects as damage assessment and restoration continues. The most up-to-date information will be available at Report Outage or Emergency | Virginia | Dominion Energy, 866-DOM-HELP (866-366-4357) or through the Dominion Energy app from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.   PWC Government Update Prince William County Government offices will open late at 10 A.M. on Wednesday, January 5, 2022. The Judicial Center and Solid Waste facilities will open on time; several other facilities and programs will have delayed openings beyond 10:00 A.M.:  All Libraries will have a delayed opening at 12:00 P.M.; check back in the morning for a list of branches that will be open on Wednesday. The Sharon Baucom Dale City Recreation Center and Chin Aquatics and Fitness Center will open late at 12:00 P.M.  All preschool programs are canceled.  All other Parks and Recreation facilities will remain closed until conditions will allow safe reopening. See https://www.pwcva.gov/emergency Wednesday morning for the latest information about facility opening times. UPDATE: 7 PM, 1/3/22 Dominion Update As of 5:00 p.m., more than 377,000+ of Dominion Energy Virginia customers have been affected, with nearly 225,000 customers still without service due to winter weather impacts -- heavy, wet snow and tree impacts due to high winds. As Dominion Energy and contract crews begin their storm restoration efforts, we will work throughout the day and night to restore service as conditions permit.  Our restoration crews are working as quickly and safely as possible to restore power; however, dangerous travel and hazardous working conditions are slowing down the restoration process. Therefore, we are encouraging our customers, particularly those in the hardest-hit areas, to prepare for the possibility of being without power for multiple days.  The hardest-hit areas include the Charlottesville/Albemarle areas, Greater Fredericksburg Region; parts of Prince William and Fairfax counties and significant pockets in the Richmond Metro Region.  Schools Update Fairfax, Prince William, and Stafford Schools are closed for Tuesday, Jan 4. VDOT Update As a quick-hitting winter storm leaves the region today, residents are reminded to give road crews room as they clear snow and downed trees in Northern Virginia this afternoon. Overnight tonight and tomorrow morning, limit nonessential trips if possible, and remain keenly alert to icy spots if traveling.  VDOT Northern Virginia crews will remain on duty this afternoon and overnight to push accumulation, as well as to treat roads overnight for the refreeze of any melted precipitation to the pavement. Winds and the weight of heavy, wet snow are bringing down trees, branches, and power lines. Reminders for Residents and Drivers: In neighborhoods, crews will treat trouble spots with a salt/sand mix and where more than two inches of snow have accumulated, plows will make an 8' -to-10' path. Learn more. If possible, avoid overnight and early morning travel until after sunrise and temperatures improve. Temperatures will remain below freezing, causing potential icy conditions and black ice. If you drive, allow extra time. Clear vehicles completely of ice. Take the trip slowly, increase distance behind other vehicles, and brake gently. Use extra caution on elevated surfaces such as bridges, ramps and overpasses. Check road conditions: Use www.511virginia.org, the free mobile app, or call 511 from any phone in Virginia. Follow @vadotnova and @NWS_BaltWash for real-time updates! UPDATED: 10 AM, 1/3/22 Metro Update Metrobus is temporarily suspending service immediately due to rapidly deteriorating weather and hazardous road conditions throughout the region. All buses currently in operation with customers will operate to the end of the line to complete their routes if safe to do so. All other buses will hold at stops until roads are passable and safe to resume service. Heavy snow continues to fall throughout the region and travel is strongly discouraged unless absolutely necessary. As crews work to clear roads, Metro will continue to monitor road conditions to determine when it is safe to resume service. As an alternative, customers who must travel should consider using Metrorail service which continues to operate on a normal schedule with trains every 12-24 minutes. Customers are encouraged to sign up for MetroAlerts text and email messages for the latest service information. In addition, Metro will also provide updates when service is safe to resume and service information through the Status and Alerts page at wmata.com and on Twitter @MetrobusInfo and @MetrorailInfo. Dominion Update As today’s wintry weather progresses throughout Virginia, electrical outages have started in the Dominion Energy territory and we expect pocket outages will continue throughout the day.   Dominion Energy Virginia has mobilized its entire workforce of tree crews and bucket trucks, with additional contract crews supporting, to respond to outages. As is always the case in restoration, our initial priorities will be safety and restoration of critical services while we assess the overall damage to our system. We remind all our customers to stay away from downed power lines and to assume all such lines are energized.  It is essential to report down power lines or outages. To report outages, a customer may call us at 866-DOM-HELP (866-366-4357). Outages may also be tracked and reported online at Report Outage or Emergency | Virginia | Dominion Energy or through the Dominion Energy app from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store. UPDATED: 11 PM, 1/2/22 It’s that time of year again. Winter in Northern Virginia is often a surprising blend of chill winter weather and unseasonably warm temperatures. Occasionally, snow gets thrown into the mix. This week, we might be in for some potentially hazardous winter weather. The Washington Post expects 3-9 inches of snow could accumulate in parts of the district. In light of this week’s forecast, I want to share some resources that you can use to ensure that you stay safe and informed during inclement weather. Weather Updates Like with most weather forecasts, there’s a decent amount of uncertainty surrounding the conditions we might see. Some parts of the district might only get rain or freezing rain, while others might experience more severe forms of wintery participation. The National Weather Service is a great resource for monitoring weather conditions. Click Here For Weather Forecast Winter Storm GuidanceWinter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days. Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.Before, during and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable. Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited. Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary. Always give snow plows the right of way. Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks! Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home. Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. Protect yourself from Frostbite! Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. Keep dry! Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing. Snow Removal As always, residents are asked to track the latest forecasts, plan ahead to avoid nonessential travel during winter weather, and to be aware of the potential for black ice and nightly refreeze as temperatures remain low. To track when your neighborhood will be plowed, visit the Virginia Department of Transportation’s (VDOT) plowing website, which activates after 2 inches of snow have accumulated in your county. If you live on a private street, it is the responsibility of the developers or the homeowner’s association to arrange for the street to be cleared. Call 800-FOR-Road (800-367-7623) for information on snow removal or to inform VDOT of any snow removal problems. TTY users can call 711. While there’s no legal obligation to clear the sidewalk in front of your house, we rely on residents to help keep neighborhoods pedestrian-friendly during snowy winters. Now more than ever, we’re encouraging younger residents who are able to assist their elderly neighbors with clearing their residential sidewalks to do so in a safe and socially distanced manner. Preventing unnecessary hospitalizations due to icy conditions is especially important during the current COVID-19 pandemic.Remember to exercise caution when driving, stay home if you’re able to, and make sure you’re informed before leaving your home. The VDOT website provides guidelines for how to commute and travel safely during snowy and icy conditions. Again, if you’re able to shelter in place, that’s always the safest option.If you live in Fairfax County, the Fairfax County Emergency Information site provides up-to-date information on the forecast and how the weather could be affecting road conditions, traffic, and public transportation. If you live in Prince William County, you can access updates on weather and traffic conditions on their emergency event information site. If you live in Prince William County, more weather-related resources and updates can be found on the county website. -------------------- Stay warm, stay safe, and look out for your neighbors.

Weekly Column: Redistricting Process Should Involve the Public

November 17, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of November 16, 2021.  Redistricting Process Should Involve the Public                 Last week, I reported on the status of the state legislative and congressional redistricting process which has now moved to the Supreme Court of Virginia because the Virginia Redistricting Commission failed to adopt maps.                  On Friday, the Supreme Court effectively disqualified all three Republican nominees to serve as special master over the redistricting process because of their conflicts of interest and partisan ties.  Specifically, the Court noted that the Republican Caucuses had not advised the Court that one nominee had received a $20,000 payment from the Senate Republican Caucus two months ago and had an express conflict.  The other two nominees were unsuitable as well.  A second nominee received $5,000 per month from the Republican National Committee.  The third Republican nominee has participated in putting together some of the most notorious, court-rejected and illegal racial gerrymanders in American history and lacked credibility according to a federal judge.                 The Court ordered the Republican Caucuses to submit three new nominees by November 17.  One Democratic nominee indicated he did not want to serve in this process so the Court ordered the Democrats to submit an additional name.                  Once the Supreme Court announces the two special masters for the process, the special masters are required to produce maps within 30 days for the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate  and Virginia’s 11 congressional districts.                 At this point, it is not clear how much public comment will be allowed either before or after the maps are published.  The Senate Democratic Caucus has proposed that the Court hold one public hearing before the maps are drawn to consider legal questions and four regional hearings after the maps are published so that the public can provide comments.                 There are several legal points in dispute which resulted in the stalemate at the Virginia Redistricting Commission.  First, Virginia law requires districts to be drawn in a way that does not “unduly favor” any political party.  Notwithstanding the fact that the last election was decided by 70,000 votes of 3.6 million cast, Virginia has been trending in the Democratic direction in recent years.  The Republican caucuses insist that maps be drawn to give either party an equal chance of controlling a chamber.  Democrats argue this would require a partisan gerrymander and by definition would “unduly benefit” the Republican party.                 Second, current law requires maps to be drawn giving consideration to “communities of interest.”  There are questions about the exact legal standard to determine what a community of interest is for purposes of creating district boundaries.  There are also questions regarding the relative weight masters should give to other variables such as compactness, continuity, jurisdiction splits and especially racial composition.  Most districts in Northern Virginia are not majority white, including the 36th Senate District.  Due to ambiguity in recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, there is a lack of clarity regarding the masters’ responsibility to maximize majority non-white districts.                 Redistricting is a fundamental process that will determine who represents you for the next 10 years in the state Senate, House of Delegates and the United States Congress.  The new districts will have a significant impact on the policies adopted in this state and country for the next decade.  It is critical that Virginia conduct this process in a fair and transparent fashion and I am confident, especially with the Virginia Supreme Court’s recent actions, that the special masters will try to be fair.                 However, the special masters will not know all of Virginia well or the nuances of our communities.  I strongly believe that even though this process has moved to the courts, the public should have a clearly defined role and provide input.  However, understandably, I have found most people who do not follow this every day need to see a map before they can comment.  In the coming weeks, there are likely to be proposed maps and opportunities for comment.  I encourage you to participate.  The Supreme Court has ordered that anyone wishing to comment can send an email to Redistricting@vacourts.gov.                  If you have any feedback, please email me at scott@scottsurovell.org.

Thoughts on 2021 Election

November 3, 2021
    Last night's election results were not what I hoped to see, but the voters have spoken and we now have a new political reality to navigate over the next four years.  We saw the highest turnout for a Virginia Governor's election in a long time and that was a good thing.  Many voters took advantage of the new laws we passed in the last two years making it easier to vote and I hope every agrees that democracy works better when more people participate.      Voters in the 36th District voted for the Democratic Ticket by over 20% margin - probably closer to 25% if early votes were counted by precinct.  Only 4 of the 47 precincts I represent voted for the Republican gubernatorial nominee and if early votes were returned to their precincts, probably closers to two.  The Republican message did not resonate with a majority of 36th District voters or for that matter Northern Virginia. Fairfax County voted for Terry McAuliffe by 30% Prince William County for Terry McAuliffe by 28% Stafford County voted for Glenn Youngkin by 30%, but it's Board of Supervisors effectively flipped to Democratic control for the first time in over a decade.      Every legislator in Fairfax County and Prince William County was returned to office and none of the open seats changed control.  I congratulate two new members in Northern Virginia: Briana Sewell who will replace Hala Ayala in the Occoquan part of the 36th District; and Michelle Maldonado who will join our Prince William County General Assembly Delegation.       I also congratulate my returning colleagues who won re-election yesterday who share constituents with me: Delegate Paul Krizek, Delegate Mark Sickles, Delegate Candi King, Delegate Kathy Tran, and Delegate Elizabeth Guzman.      Former-Governor Terry McAuliffe brought important issues to the table, was a consummate team player, and was a very accomplished Governor.  I will miss his passion in Richmond.   It has been an honor to serve and represent Occoquan residents with Delegate Hala Ayala for the last four years and I wish her well in her next endeavor.  Attorney General Mark Herring brought Democratic values to the Attorney General's Office for the first time in twenty-eight years and had important accomplishments in civil rights and modernizing his office.      I am also sorry to lose Delegate Josh Cole in the Stafford County part of my district who was always a refreshing and passionate voice for Stafford County and Fredericksburg, but look forward to working with Supervisor-Elect R. Pamela Yeung who will be the new supervisor in the Garrisonville District of Stafford County.        The House of Delegates appears to have flipped in partisan control after it was forced to run in seats that were drawn as a partisan gerrymander which leaves Northern Virginia short two seats instead of new districts because U.S. Census data came in late.  There are two seats where late received mail-in balance could alter the balance, but that chamber will at-best be evenly divided for the next year.  I would not be surprised if a court orders new elections for next year once the Supreme Court of Virginia has redrawn the seats next month.       I congratulate Glen Youngkin, Winsome Sears and Jason Miyares for putting themselves out there and winning their races.  I look forward to finding common ground and continuing to work on the progress we have made over the last two years making Virginia the best state for business and a leader on climate change, criminal justice reform, and civil rights.  I while Mark Herring has done an incredible job as Attorney General for the last four years, I also look forward to seeing the first JMU-Duke (Jason Miyares) in statewide office.         Mr. Youngkin reached out to me today to emphasize that he looks forward to working together.  I told him that I had a good relationship with Governor McDonnell in the four years I served with him and that I was confident that we could find a way to work together on some issues without compromising our core values.  Do not forget that the process that led to the $1 Billion widening of U.S. 1 and construction of Bus Rapid Transit began with the Route 1 Multimodal Study that Former Governor Bob McDonnell (a former 36th District native) agreed to fund.        I also recognize that many of my constituents and supporters are disappointed by the election results.  I have many thoughts about the outcome.  First, I have always felt that elections should be about the future and what you intend to propose to accomplish.  I did not feel like the last few weeks of the races met that standard and was disappointed by the overall tone of the race.  The continued gridlock in Washington, D.C. continues to leave many frustrated and despondent about the ability of government to achieve real results for people.  I hope Congress looks to how Democrats reached a consensus in Virginia over the last two years and delivered real results for people so that we do not continue to see the kind of collateral damage we saw yesterday.      It is also important to remember that parents do have a voice in their children's education - that's the entire point of Parent-Teacher Associations and Parent-Teacher conferences.  Schools work better when parents are involved in their schools and there are many ways parents can be involved in schools without micromanaging the work of our professionally-licensed teachers.  My parents, children and I are all the product of our public education system and Northern Virginia's public schools are some of the strongest in America.  We can provide a high quality education to all of our students without bringing a political wrecking ball to our school board meetings.       Going forward, I hope to focus on continuing to make investments in transit, finding options for family sick and family leave, finalizing our marijuana legalization discussion, and making Virginia a more equitable and just place to live.  We must continue to fight to make Virginia the best it can be.       Finally, I look forward to the Supreme Court of Virginia's proposed new maps for Senate, House and Congressional Districts that we should expect to see by the middle of December.  There is more change coming to Virginia over the next twelve months and I hope I will continue to earn your trust representing you in Richmond. 

Supporting transit options in Prince William County

October 28, 2021
The Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) released a draft final report Executive Summary of its Springfield to Quantico Enhanced Public Transportation Feasibility Study. DRPT is evaluating: - Metro Expansion in Fairfax County and Prince William County - Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)  - Express Buses - Enhanced VRE  Please make your voice heard on what you want to see for the future of our community.  You can find the proposed Executive Summary here: http://www.drpt.virginia.gov/transit/springfield-to-quantico/ DRPT needs to hear that residents want enhanced public transportation options to prioritize funding. Complete this brief 10-minute survey and have your voice heard about the potential future transit enhancements in Fairfax and Prince William counties. YOUR COMMENTS ARE NEEDED.  Please complete these comment forms, tell the DRPT how critical these projects are for our community and Northern Virginia. As always, please reach out to my office at 571-249-4484 or district36@senate.virginia.gov if you have questions or ideas about things we can do to serve the community better. It is an honor to serve you in Richmond.  Loading…

Weekly Column: State Legislature Decides on Funds, Addresses Needs

August 13, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of August 13, 2021. State Legislature Decides on Funds, Addresses Needs On August 10, the General Assembly completed work in a special session to appropriate federal pandemic funds and elect judges.  In March, President Joe Biden signed the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA).  ARPA brought $4.3 billion in unexpected funds to Virginia but required it to be invested in specific areas such as water, sewer and broadband infrastructure to respond to the COVID-19 emergency, address pandemic impacts and provide government services suffering from revenue reductions because of the pandemic.  Unlike other counties, Fairfax County received $222 million in direct ARPA funding with similar requirements.  Here is how voted to invest most of these funds: ·      $700 million to build “last-mile” broadband and close Virgina’s digital divide over the next three years;  ·         $862 million for Virginia’s Unemployment Trust Fund which was depleted.  Without our action, it would have been forced to assess major unemployment insurance premium increases on small businesses’  ·         $73.6 million to upgrade the Virginia Employment Commission’s systems to improve responses to unemployment claims; ·         $250 million for school heating, ventilation and air conditioning upgrades if localities match those funds, localities that are traditionally charged with funding 100% of school construction costs in Virginia.  ·         $411 million for wastewater treatment infrastructure, including $125 million for the Alexandria, Richmond and Lynchburg combined sewers which currently dump billions of gallons of untreated sewage into the Potomac and James Rivers.  ·         $25 million for the Virginia state park maintenance backlog.  I had hoped to address a statewide $275 million backlog so we can complete work at Stafford County’s Widewater State Park. I will continue to press for this in the Governor’s next budget. ·         $111 million in financial aid for low-income Virginia college students; ·         An historic $250 million investment in our  stressed mental health system;  ·         $120 million for consumer utility assistance; ·         New funds for supportive housing, substance abuse treatment and community crisis systems; ·         $5,000 bonuses for all Virginia State Police (VSP) and state Capitol Police officers and $3,000 bonuses for deputy sheriffs and correctional officers around the state.  We also funded bonuses to alleviate salary compression in the VSP and $5,000 recruitment bonuses with $2,000 recruitment relocation grants. ·         $3 million to improve access to early voting; ·         $4 million for gun violence prevention programs; ·         We also retained $1.1 billion of ARPA funds to appropriate in 2022 contingent upon Delta variant progress. We also passed an amendment requiring the Department of Motor Vehicles to open for in-person service within 30 days. We also worked to reform Virginia’s judicial appellate system.  Prior to our action, Virginia was the only state in America that did not provide a right of appeal to litigants in either criminal or civil cases.  In 2020, I carried a resolution directing the Judicial Council of Virginia to study the issue and that group recommended a change.  I worked with Senate Judiciary Chairman Senator John Edwards to draft the legislation which passed during the regular session. The study recommended that the legislature elect six new judges to handle the case volume generated by creating a right of appeal.  Because of two retirements among existing judges, we had to elect eight new members to the Court.  After a six-month vetting process by nine bar associations that considered 82 applicants, our caucuses vetted candidates and elected eight new members to the Court of Appeals of Virginia. Four new judges will come from Northern Virginia.  This is a welcome development because previously our region had only one member, but we have over 32% of Virginia’s population.  The Court of Appeals has never had a judge from Arlington or Alexandria.  There were no judges on the existing court who lived west of Richmond.  We elected one judge from Charlottesville and one from Roanoke.  Four new judges are African-Americans and four are women.  The existing court had only one minority member and three women.   The new judges represent a diversity of legal expertise, practice areas, life experiences and perspectives and eight judges have not been elected since the Court was created in 1985.  Our action was truly historic and will greatly bolster our judicial system and how it operates. It is an honor to serve you.  Please share your views with me at scott@scottsurovell.org. 

These are all of the video clips of Scott Surovell’s remarks on the floor of the Senate since 2010. There are 210 video clips in all.

Bills

  • SB6: Judges; increases from six to seven the maximum number in the Thirty-first Judicial Circuit.
  • SB64: Proceeds of compromise agreements; investment in college savings trust accounts for minors.
  • SB97: Occoquan, Town of; new charter, previous charter repealed except section 2.
  • SB106: Retired circuit and district court judges under recall; evaluation.
  • SB246: Law-enforcement officer; purpose of traffic stop.
  • SB247: Careless driving; vulnerable road users.
  • SB248: Digestate; definition, definition of anaerobic digestion.
  • SB249: Sexual abuse of animals; definitions, penalty.
  • SB250: Nonhazardous solid waste management facilities; increases the annual fees.
  • SB251: Northern Virginia Transportation Authority; funds for pedestrian and bicyclist projects.
  • SB348: Support orders; retroactivity, arrearages, party's incarceration.
  • SB349: Division of marital property; Va. Retirement System managed defined contribution plan, etc.
  • SB350: Health records; patient's right to disclosure.
  • SB351: Workers' compensation; permanent and total incapacity, subsequent accident.
  • SB352: Health care providers and grocery store workers, etc.; employers to provide paid sick leave, clause.
  • SB392: Clerk of the court; copies of appointment order to counsel.
  • SB464: Witnesses; summons in a criminal matter, requirements.
  • SB465: Employee protections; candidacy for or service in the General Assembly.
  • SB466: Virginia College Equity Foundation and Fund; established.
  • SB565: Natural gas, biogas, and other gas sources of energy; definitions, energy conservation.
  • SB669: Law-enforcement employees; alleged wrongdoing.
  • SB740: Common interest communities; standards for structural integrity and reserves for capital components.
  • SB741: Facial recognition technology; authorized uses.
  • SB742: Marijuana; expungement of offenses, civil penalty.
  • SB745: Marijuana-related offenses; modification of sentence.
  • SB746: Minors; prohibition of deceptive tactics during custodial interrogation.
  • SJ6: Commending the Honorable Michael J. Cassidy.
  • SJ10: Pandemic response and preparedness; joint subcommittee to study.
  • SJ94: Commending the Honorable H. Jan Roltsch-Anoll.
  • SJ121: Celebrating the life of Joseph Rogers.
  • SJ208: Commending Rose Hill Elementary School.
  • SJ209: Commending Belle View Elementary School.
  • SJ210: Commending Lake Ridge Parks and Recreation Association, Inc.
  • SJ211: Commending Hayfield Elementary School.
  • SJ212: Commending Woodlawn Elementary School.
  • SB449: Death penalty; abolishes penalty, including those persons currently under a death sentence.
  • SB626: Hazardous Substance Aboveground Storage Tank Fund; created.
  • SB637: Estate tax; reinstatement.
  • SB641: Civil action; sale of personal data.
  • SB1092: Performance guarantees, certain; provisions for periodic partial and final release.
  • SB1165: Death penalty; abolition of current penalty.
  • SB1165: Death penalty; abolition of current penalty.
  • SB1180: Civil actions; actions filed on behalf of multiple similarly situated persons.
  • SB1180: Civil actions; actions filed on behalf of multiple similarly situated persons.
  • SB1181: Special immigrant juvenile status; jurisdiction.
  • SB1181: Special immigrant juvenile status; jurisdiction.
  • SB1182: Motor vehicle liability insurance; increases coverage amounts.
  • SB1182: Motor vehicle liability insurance; increases coverage amounts.
  • SB1289: Health insurance; carrier business practices, provider contracts.
  • SB1289: Health insurance; carrier business practices, provider contracts.
  • SB1339: Police and court records; expungement and sealing of records, Expungement Fee Fund created.
  • SB1339: Police and court records; expungement and sealing of records, Expungement Fee Fund created.
  • SB1384: Virginia Public Procurement Act; local arbitration agreements.
  • SB1384: Virginia Public Procurement Act; local arbitration agreements.
  • SB1385: Underground utility facilities; Fairfax County.
  • SB1385: Underground utility facilities; Fairfax County.
  • SB1440: Law-enforcement officer, etc.; civil action for unlawful acts of force or failure to intervene.
  • SB1446: Medicine and other healing arts; practice, provision of litigation assistance.
  • SB1457: Historic sites; urban county executive form of gov't. (Fairfax County), provisions in its ordinance.
  • SB1457: Historic sites; urban county executive form of gov't. (Fairfax County), provisions in its ordinance.
  • SB1468: Victims of crime; certifications for victims of qualifying criminal activity.
  • SB1468: Victims of crime; certifications for victims of qualifying criminal activity.
  • SJ278: Commending the Honorable Bruce D. White.
  • SJ279: Commending the Honorable Steven Selwyn Smith.
  • SJ280: Commending the Honorable Kimberly J. Daniel.
  • SJ281: Commending the Honorable Janine M. Saxe.
  • SJ283: Celebrating the life of Marisa L. Fleck.
  • SJ340: Commending Edwin C. Roessler, Jr.
  • SR506: Commending the Virginia State Police and the Virginia National Guard.
  • SR509: Commending Walt Whitman Middle School.
  • SR510: Commending Montclair Elementary School.
  • SR511: Commending Swans Creek Elementary School.
  • SR512: Commending Featherstone Elementary School.
  • SR513: Celebrating the life of Charles R. Hooff III.
  • SR522: Celebrating the life of Thomas F. Cleary, M.D.
  • SR523: Celebrating the life of Carlton Farquhar Andrus.
  • SR710: Commending the James Madison University softball team.
  • SR711: Commending Village Hardware.
  • SR712: Commending Ourisman Automotive Group.
  • SR713: Commending the Reverend Keary Kincannon.
  • SR714: Commending Michael Fanone.
  • SR715: Commending the Honorable Janice Justina Wellington.
  • SR716: Commending the South County High School girls' soccer team.
  • SB33: Consumer finance companies; loans, licensing.
  • SB34: Driver privilege cards; definitions, effective date, report.
  • SB35: Firearms, ammunition, etc.; control by localities by governing possession, etc., within locality.
  • SB37: Open-end credit plans; civil penalty.
  • SB38: Open-end credit plans; governing law.
  • SB72: Public defender offices; Cities of Manassas and Manassas Park and County of Prince William.
  • SB106: Hydraulic fracturing; drilling through any portion of a groundwater management area, prohibition.
  • SB108: Virginia State Justice Commission; purpose, membership.
  • SB160: Handheld personal communications devices; holding devices while driving a motor vehicle.
  • SB245: Conversion therapy; prohibited by certain health care providers.
  • SB246: Driver's license, etc.; sex designation on application form.
  • SB247: No-fault divorce; gender-neutral terminology.
  • SB428: Initial child support order; unreimbursed medical expenses for pregnancy and birth.
  • SB429: Child support; withholding from income of an independent contractor.
  • SB430: Minor's child-care records; access by parent.
  • SB431: Provision of mental health services to a minor; access to health records.
  • SB432: Spousal support; reservation of right to seek, material change of circumstances.
  • SB433: Domestic relations cases; invocation of constitutional rights, adverse inference.
  • SB434: Child support; assignment of tax credits.
  • SB435: Waterfowl blinds; blinds in locality where certain hunting prohibited.
  • SB436: Virginia Voluntary Do Not Sell Firearms List; established, penalty.
  • SB437: Bicyclists and other vulnerable road users; penalty.
  • SB438: Judicial performance evaluation program; risk assessment tool, use of alternative sanction.
  • SB439: Driving under the influence; remote alcohol monitoring, penalty.
  • SB440: Electronic transmission of sexually explicit visual material by minors; penalties.
  • SB441: Alcoholic beverage control; winery license privileges.
  • SB449: Death penalty; abolishes penalty, including those persons currently under a death sentence.
  • SB451: Juvenile and domestic relations district court; award of attorney fees and costs.
  • SB489: Criminal cases; authority to defer and dismiss.
  • SB491: Inquiry and report of immigration status; persons charged with or convicted of certain crimes.
  • SB492: Sex offenses; requiring registration.
  • SB625: Failure to advise of consequences of guilty plea; vacation of conviction.
  • SB626: Hazardous Substance Aboveground Storage Tank Fund; created.
  • SB628: Virginia Residential Property Disclosure Act; residential building energy analysis.
  • SB629: Shared solar programs; electric utility regulation, etc.
  • SB630: Common interest communities; electric vehicle charging stations permitted.
  • SB631: Abandoned and stolen shopping carts; local regulation.
  • SB632: Public utilities; aggregate energy storage capacity in the Commonwealth.
  • SB634: Alternative and efficient energies; subsidies and effective clause.
  • SB635: Right to reproductive choice; right to refuse contraception.
  • SB636: Racial inequity; repeals numerous obsolete and discriminatory Acts.
  • SB637: Estate tax; reinstatement.
  • SB638: Affordable housing; location near Metrorail station.
  • SB639: Virginia Growth and Opportunity Fund; regional grant awards.
  • SB640: Unlawful detainer; expungement of actions, effective date.
  • SB641: Civil action; sale of personal data.
  • SB642: Multi-jurisdiction grand jury; functions, failure to pay wages.
  • SB645: Local arbitration agreements; disclosure of certain information.
  • SB646: Tetrahydrocannabinol concentration; definition.
  • SB655: Physical injuries or death caused to a person; consideration of bills.
  • SB658: Contracts with design professionals; provisions requiring a duty to defend void.
  • SB659: Contributory negligence; motor vehicle accident involving a pedestrian, bicyclist, etc.
  • SB661: Accrual of cause of action; diagnoses of nonmalignant and malignant asbestos-related injury.
  • SB663: Practice of medicine and other healing arts; provision of litigation assistance.
  • SB664: Motor vehicles; liability insurance coverage limits, effective date.
  • SB937: TANF Scholarship Pilot Program; VCCS to establish and administer.
  • SB963: Energy manager; responsibilities.
  • SB995: Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority; labor organizations.
  • SB1043: Civil actions; filed on behalf of multiple persons.
  • SB1092: Performance guarantees, certain; provisions for periodic partial and final release.
  • SB5032: Assault and battery; penalty.
  • SB5033: Court authority in criminal cases; prosecutorial discretion to dispose of a criminal case.
  • SB5045: Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission, et al.; required to prepare fiscal impact statements.
  • SJ34: Mandatory minimum sentences; VSCC to study use, etc.
  • SJ47: Court of Appeals of Virginia; Judicial Council of Virginia to study jurisdiction and organization.
  • SJ153: Commending River Oaks Elementary School.
  • SJ154: Commending Triangle Elementary School.
  • SJ155: Commending Forest Park High School.
  • SR71: Commending the Lee-Mount Vernon Sports Club.
  • SR516: Commending Lloyd J. 'Bud' Vye.
  • SR564: Commending the Honorable Janine M. Saxe.
  • SB93: Parole; eligibility for, at liberty between offenses.
  • SB613: Local government; deposition.
  • SB737: Driving under influence of alcohol; license conditions for first offense.
  • SB765: Coal ash ponds; mandatory testing of drinking water wells in Chesapeake Bay watershed.
  • SB766: Citizen water quality monitoring; use as evidence in enforcement actions.
  • SB767: Coal ash ponds; flaws in closure plans, delay of permit.
  • SB768: Electric utilities; recovery of costs associated with closure in place of coal ash facilities.
  • SB770: Absentee voting; alternative locations for in-person absentee voting.
  • SB771: Absentee voting; counting military and overseas absentee ballots received after close of polls.
  • SB808: Electric utilities; Transitional Rate Period, coal combustion residuals landfills.
  • SB938: Child support; withholding of income, contracts with an independent contractor.
  • SB1533: Coal combustion residuals; Chesapeake Bay watershed, closure.
  • SB1534: Coal combustion residuals; cleanup costs.
  • SB1535: Uniform Statewide Building Code; outdoor advertising.
  • SB1536: Out-of-state conviction of drug offenses; petition for restricted driver's license.
  • SB1537: Virginia Property Owners' Association Act; home-based businesses.
  • SB1538: Common interest communities; dissemination of annual budget, reserve for capital components.
  • SB1539: Child support; withholding of income of independent contractors.
  • SB1540: Protective orders; contents of preliminary orders, docketing of appeal.
  • SB1541: No-fault divorce; waiver of service of process.
  • SB1542: Civil actions; determination of indigency, no-fault divorce.
  • SB1543: Wrongful death beneficiaries; parents of decedent who receive support or services, etc.
  • SB1544: Assisted conception; parentage presumption.
  • SB1548: Consumer finance companies; loans, licensing.
  • SB1549: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; exclusion.
  • SB1550: Bicyclists & other vulnerable road users; person who operates a motor vehicle in a careless manner.
  • SB1551: School resource officers; memorandums of understanding.
  • SB1552: Absentee voting; alternative locations for in-person absentee voting.
  • SB1553: Urban county executive form of government; abandoned shopping carts.
  • SB1554: Virginia Freedom of Information Act (FOIA); violations and civil penalties.
  • SB1691: Dumfries, Town of; amending charter, town council elections, etc.
  • SB1740: Driver privilege cards; penalty.
  • SB1756: Virginia Condominium and Virginia Property Owners' Association Acts; stormwater facilities.
  • SB1757: Custody and visitation arrangements; best interests of the child, domestic abuse and child abuse.
  • SB1758: Juvenile and domestic relations district courts; jurisdiction, specific findings of fact.
  • SB1759: Underground electric distribution lines; placing in areas of transit-oriented development.
  • SJ438: Celebrating the life of John Harper.
  • SJ439: Commending United Community Ministries, Inc.
  • SJ440: Commending the Northern Virginia Conservation Trust.
  • SJ441: Commending the Prince William County Bar Association.
  • SJ442: Commending Neabsco Elementary School.
  • SJ461: Commending Barney Barnwell.
  • SJ465: Commending the Honorable Jan Brodie.
  • SB21: Grand larceny & certain property crimes; increases threshold amount of money taken, etc., to $500.
  • SB22: Security freezes; elimination of fees.
  • SB74: Handheld personal communications devices; use while driving.
  • SB85: Protective orders, preliminary; contents of order.
  • SB86: Driver's license; driving after forfeiture of license, penalty.
  • SB87: Careless driving; cause of injury to vulnerable road user.
  • SB88: Bicycle lane; penalty for driver to pass another vehicle using lane.
  • SB89: Child abuse or neglect; civil proceedings, testimony of children.
  • SB93: Parole, eligibility for; at liberty between offenses.
  • SB94: Police and court records; expungement of records.
  • SB95: Security freezes; protected consumer, proof of authority,
  • SB245: Conversion therapy; prohibited by certain health care providers.
  • SB447: Firearms; transfers, etc., penalties.
  • SB607: Electronic transmission of sexually explicit images by minors; penalties.
  • SB608: Police and court records; expungement, plea agreements.
  • SB609: Juvenile offenders; Retention of jurisdiction.
  • SB610: Adultery; reduces Class 4 misdemeanor to a civil penalty.
  • SB611: Motor vehicles; increases liability insurance coverage limits.
  • SB612: Assisted conception; parentage presumption.
  • SB613: Local government; deposition.
  • SB614: Spousal support; modification.
  • SB615: Spousal support payments; employer withholding.
  • SB616: Waiver of immunity; persons covered by insurance policy.
  • SB617: Statute of limitations; discovery rule.
  • SB618: Expert witnesses; no fees shall be charged by government officer and employees.
  • SB619: Virginia Human Rights Act; limitations on causes of action.
  • SB620: Arbitration; denial of motion to compel.
  • SB621: Driver privilege cards; authorizes issuance of new cards by DMV.
  • SB622: Local transportation plan; secondary system road construction program allocation.
  • SB623: Electronic Routing Registry; created.
  • SB624: Va. Consumer Protection Act; open-end credit plans.
  • SB625: Consumer finance companies; licensing by SCC.
  • SB626: Life insurance on minors; consent of parents.
  • SB627: Home inspection servicers; certain contract provisions prohibited.
  • SB628: Notaries; qualifications, misdemeanor offense of moral turpitude.
  • SB629: State Corporation Commission; disclosures of information provided by financial institutions.
  • SB630: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; civil penalty.
  • SB705: Va. Condominium & Property Owners' Association Act; contents of disclosure packets.
  • SB706: Common interest communities; reserves for capital components, budget.
  • SB707: Virginia Property Owners' Association Act; home-based businesses.
  • SB722: Condominium and Property Owners' Association Acts; access to association books and records.
  • SB737: Driving under influence of alcohol; license conditions for first offense.
  • SB765: Coal ash ponds; mandatory testing of drinking water wells in Chesapeake Bay watershed.
  • SB766: Citizen water quality monitoring; use as evidence in enforcement actions.
  • SB767: Coal ash ponds; flaws in closure plans, delay of permit.
  • SB768: Electric utilities; recovery of costs associated with closure in place of coal ash facilities.
  • SB769: Alcoholic beverage control; beer licenses.
  • SB770: Absentee voting; alternative locations for in-person absentee voting.
  • SB771: Absentee voting; counting military and overseas absentee ballots received after close of polls.
  • SB772: Claims; Danial J Williams, Joseph Jesse Dick, Jr., Eric Cameron Wilson, and Derek Elliot Tice.
  • SB785: Electronic textbooks; prohibits local school boards from requiring use in any course in grades 6-12.
  • SB786: Public schools; fee for enrollment of certain students.
  • SB787: Governor's Schools; enrollment.
  • SB789: Family life education; sexually explicit communications and images.
  • SB807: Coal combustion residuals and other units; permits, request for proposals.
  • SB808: Electric utilities; Transitional Rate Period, coal combustion residuals landfills.
  • SB938: Child support; withholding of income, contracts with an independent contractor.
  • SB951: Eastern Virginia; hydraulic fracturing prohibited.
  • SJ4: United States Constitution; ratifies Equal Rights Amendment.
  • SJ17: Commending the Honorable Gerald Bruce Lee.
  • SJ28: Driving under influence of alcohol; VSCC to study decrease in convictions.
  • SJ58: Law clerks; study on use and impact on judicial workload and work product.
  • SJ72: Commending the Honorable Helen Leiner.
  • SJ103: Commending the Honorable Craig D. Johnston.
  • SJ147: Commending the Honorable James C. Cacheris.
  • SJ148: Commending Fort Hunt Little League.
  • SJ149: Commending Riverside Elementary School.
  • SJ150: Commending John F. Pattie Sr. Elementary School.
  • SJ240: Commending Embark Richmond Highway.
  • SJ243: Commending the Mount Vernon Voice.
  • SB255: Toll relief; Department of Transportation to study.
  • SB533: Sales and use tax; exemption for certain nonprofit entities.
  • SB741: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • SB752: Health insurance provider contracts; accepting enrollees as patients.
  • SB814: Foreign business entities; services of summons for witness or subpoena duces tecum.
  • SB815: Child support, unpaid; priority of debts to be paid from decedent's assets.
  • SB816: Grand larceny & certain property crimes; increases threshold amount of money taken, etc., to $1,000.
  • SB817: Restricted driver's license; purposes.
  • SB818: Potomac River Watershed; DEQ to identify owner of any combined sewer overflow outfall, etc.
  • SB860: Use of handheld personal communications devices while driving; penalty.
  • SB861: Preliminary protective orders; contents of order.
  • SB862: Driving after forfeiture of license.
  • SB863: Operating a motor vehicle; obstructed view; secondary offense.
  • SB906: Introduction of snakehead fish; penalty.
  • SB907: Higher educational institutions, public; certain positions require residency of the Commonwealth.
  • SB1102: FOIA; records of completed unattended death investigations, definition, mandatory disclosure.
  • SB1103: FOIA; closed meeting violations, civil penalty.
  • SB1104: Form of ballot; order of independent candidates, required paperwork.
  • SB1124: Adultery; civil penalty.
  • SB1125: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; open-end credit plans.
  • SB1126: Consumer finance companies; Internet loans, report.
  • SB1335: Electronic textbooks; prohibits local school boards from requiring use in any course in grades 6-12.
  • SB1336: Sales and use tax; school supplies and hurricane preparedness sales tax holidays.
  • SB1337: Claims; Davey Reedy.
  • SB1338: Bicycle lane; penalty for driver to pass another vehicle using lane.
  • SB1339: Careless driving; infliction of injury on vulnerable road user.
  • SB1340: Towing; regulations.
  • SB1341: Government records; digital certification.
  • SB1342: District courts; jurisdictional limit does not include any attorney fees.
  • SB1343: Guardian ad litem; reimbursement for cost.
  • SB1344: In camera interviews of child; court's discretion to conduct recording or transcript.
  • SB1345: Driver privilege cards; issuance of new cards by DMV.
  • SB1346: Associate-degree-granting institutions; transfer of credit information.
  • SB1383: Coal ash; treatment by utilities, recycling.
  • SB1398: Coal combustion residuals unit; closure permit, assessments required.
  • SB1399: Coal combustion by-product impoundments; closure requirements.
  • SB1405: Higher educational institutions, public; notice of proposed tuition increase.
  • SB1439: Firearms; transfers to a non-licensed dealer.
  • SB1498: Intoxicated drivers; punitive damages for persons injured.
  • SB1512: Charitable gaming; conduct of games, special permits.
  • SJ84: Public transportation services; DRPT to evaluate study necessary to identify, etc.
  • SJ221: United States Constitution; Ratifies Equal Rights Amendment.
  • SJ226: Constitutional amendment; registration of voters (first reference).
  • SJ227: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); Governor's term of office.
  • SJ291: Study; Virginia State Crime Commission; decrease in driving a motor vehicle while intoxicated.
  • SJ292: Study; SCHEV; financial reserves; report.
  • SJ364: Commending Marine Corps Base Quantico.
  • SJ365: Commending the Honorable David S. Schell.
  • SJ366: Celebrating the life of Fannie Wilkinson Fitzgerald.
  • SJ370: Commending Bernard S. Cohen and Philip J. Hirschkop.
  • SJ374: Commending Alexandra Blaire Krieger.
  • SJ375: Commending the Honorable Jane Marum Roush.
  • SJ376: Celebrating the life of Michael Moore Skinner.
  • SJ377: Commending Occoquan Elementary School.
  • SJ442: Commending Tauxemont Cooperative Preschool.
  • SR130: Commending the Honorable Lon E. Farris.
  • SB164: Consumer finance loans; rate of interest.
  • SB165: Open-end credit agreements; sellers of certain goods to extend credit.
  • SB166: Motor vehicle title lenders; narrows exemption for consumer finance companies.
  • SB167: Consumer finance companies; annual reports.
  • SB170: Nonsuits; tolling of limitations, contractual limitation periods.
  • SB171: Insurance; jury award of attorney fees for bad faith.
  • SB172: Foreign entities; consent to jurisdiction & service of summons for witness or subpoena duces tecum.
  • SB173: Child custody or visitation; filing single petition.
  • SB174: Adultery; reduces penalty to a civil penalty.
  • SB177: Grand larceny; increases threshold amount of money taken, etc., to $1,000.
  • SB255: Toll relief; Department of Transportation to study.
  • SB256: High-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes; statute of limitations on penalties.
  • SB257: HOV and HOT lanes; penalties, increased fines for subsequent offenses.
  • SB258: Commonwealth Transportation Board; voting weighted by population.
  • SB259: Persons involuntarily admitted or ordered to outpatient treatment; purchase, etc., of ammunition.
  • SB260: Concealed handgun permit; disqualifications, residential mental health or substance abuse treatment.
  • SB261: Driving under influence; private property.
  • SB262: Conversion therapy prohibited.
  • SB263: Firearms; purchase by persons intending to commit act of terrorism, penalty.
  • SB318: Certificate of relief from collateral criminal consequences.
  • SB386: Evidence; objections to business records.
  • SB387: Regulation of towing.
  • SB388: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; failure to make required statement.
  • SB389: Local permitting or licensure; consent of common interest community association prohibited.
  • SB390: Temporary visitor's driver's licenses; DMV may issue.
  • SB391: Driver's license; driving after forfeiture, guilty of an offense.
  • SB392: Real property; judgment creditor may record an instrument, upon payment of fee for recordation, etc.
  • SB393: Preliminary protective orders; contents of order.
  • SB492: FOIA; limitation on exemption for certain criminal investigative files.
  • SB493: FOIA; closed meeting not authorized for discussion of pay increases.
  • SB494: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; record exclusions, rule of redaction, etc.
  • SB531: Digital document authentication standards; Secretary of the Commonwealth to establish.
  • SB532: Paper and plastic bags; authorizes localities in Planning District 8 by ordinance to impose a tax.
  • SB533: Sales and use tax; exemption for certain nonprofit entities.
  • SB534: Criminal history record information; unauthorized dissemination, civil actions.
  • SB537: Coal combustion by-product impoundments; closure requirements.
  • SB538: Students with limited English proficiency; alternative to the eleventh grade Standards of Learning.
  • SB539: Conflict of Interests Act, State and Local Government; requirement to file semiannual disclosure.
  • SB572: Improper driving; jury may find accused not guilty.
  • SB649: Claims; Davey Reedy.
  • SB663: Careless driving; cause of injury to vulnerable road user.
  • SB664: Ballots; order of names of candidates for school boards.
  • SB739: Drug products; products compounded by nonresident outsourcing facilities.
  • SB740: Electronic textbooks; use by students.
  • SB741: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • SB752: Health insurance provider contracts; accepting enrollees as patients.
  • SJ1: United States Constitution; ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment.
  • SJ84: Public transportation services; DRPT to evaluate study necessary to identify, etc.
  • SJ141: Commending Charles Haley.
  • SJ167: Commending the Prince William County Department of Fire and Rescue.
  • SJ190: Commending the Friends of Dyke Marsh.
  • SJ191: Commending Rising Hope United Methodist Mission Church.
  • SJ192: Commending Swans Creek Elementary School.
  • SJ197: Commending Anne Andrews.
  • SJ205: Commending Inova Mount Vernon Hospital.
  • SR89: Commending the Honorable Teena D. Grodner.
  • SR90: Commending the Honorable Thomas E. Gallahue.
  • SR91: Commending the Honorable Ian M. OFlaherty.
  • HB1289: Same-sex marriages; civil unions.
  • HB1684: Standards of Learning assessments; waivers.
  • HB2010: Public elementary and secondary schools; uniform statewide grading scale.
  • HB2011: Motor vehicle title lenders; location of offices.
  • HB2012: Starter interrupt devices; prohibits requiring installation on certain motor vehicles.
  • HB2013: State Corporation Commission; disclosure of records related to administrative activities.
  • HB2014: Adultery; reduces penalty from a Class 4 misdemeanor to a civil penalty.
  • HB2015: Creditor process; bankruptcy proceeding exemptions.
  • HB2016: Personal injury or wrongful death action; qualification of fiduciary.
  • HB2017: Aircraft, certain; local regulation.
  • HB2232: Persons involuntarily admitted or ordered to outpatient treatment; purchase, etc., ammunition.
  • HB2337: Family life education; sexually explicit communications and images.
  • HB2339: Electronic textbooks; access by students in their residence.
  • HB2375: Employers; reasonable accommodation for employees with disability.
  • HJ493: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); marriage.
  • HJ494: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); registration of voters.
  • HJ495: United States Constitution; Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ496: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); Governor's term of office.
  • HJ581: Highways; JLARC to study alternative taxes and fees for funding in the Commonwealth.
  • HJ582: Electronic government records; joint subcommittee to study feasibility of authenticating records.
  • HJ583: Local government charter, model; joint subcommittee established to study creation of charter.
  • HJ625: Education resources; DOE, et al; to study allocations.
  • HJ675: Commending the Honorable Dennis J. Smith.
  • HJ676: Commending the Honorable Charles J. Maxfield.
  • HJ677: Celebrating the life of the Honorable R. Terrence Ney.
  • HJ678: Celebrating the life of Jean Williams Auldridge.
  • HJ710: Celebrating the life of Warren Ira Cikins.
  • HJ787: Celebrating the life of the Honorable Herbert E. Harris II.
  • HJ867: Commending the Honorable Donald P. McDonough.
  • HJ868: Commending the Fairfax Young Democrats.
  • HJ869: Commending Mount Vernon Woods Elementary School.
  • HJ872: Commending Gerald W. Hyland.
  • HR303: Commending Hollin Meadows Elementary School.
  • HR307: Celebrating the life of Lieutenant Colonel John Albert Bornmann, Jr., USA (Ret.).
  • HB4: Hybrid electric motor vehicles; repeals annual license tax, refunds.
  • HB244: Grand larceny; threshold.
  • HB245: Conflict of Interests Act, State and Local Government; prohibited contracts between Governor.
  • HB246: Governor and Attorney General; parties to litigation with state, prohibited conduct, penalties.
  • HB247: Governor's Development Opportunity Fund; political contributions and gifts, prohibited conduct.
  • HB248: Special counsel; cap on compensation paid to those appointed to handle certain legal matters.
  • HB249: Judgment proceeding; setting aside judgment confessed.
  • HB250: Child custody or visitation; petition.
  • HB251: Real Estate Board; death or disability of a broker.
  • HB252: Public assets; misuse, penalty.
  • HB327: Law-Enforcement Officers Procedural Guarantee Act; definition of law-enforcement officer.
  • HB378: Improper driving; jury hearing case.
  • HB379: Commonwealth Transportation Board; changes composition of membership.
  • HB380: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; disclosure pursuant to court order or subpoena.
  • HB934: Security freezes; protected consumers, penalties.
  • HB936: Electronic textbooks; accessibility by students at school and in their residence.
  • HB937: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; application to the State Corporation Commission, exemptions.
  • HB938: Jurors; persons liable to serve.
  • HB939: Same-sex marriages; civil unions.
  • HB940: Adultery; reduces civil penalty.
  • HB941: Operating a vehicle or vessel containing a false compartment; penalty.
  • HB942: Death sentences; removes electrocution as manner of execution for prisoners, lethal injection.
  • HB943: Ignition interlock system; time for installation.
  • HB944: Ignition interlock systems; DUI drugs.
  • HB945: Driving under influence of alcohol; first offenders, license conditions.
  • HB964: Firearms; purchase by persons intending to commit act of terrorism, penalty.
  • HB979: Businesses, certain; local limitations on number.
  • HB980: Absentee voting; publication of street address for return of absentee ballots.
  • HB982: Police and court records; expungement of records, waiver of hearing.
  • HB984: Appeal from bail, bond, or recognizance order; compliance with appellate court.
  • HB1061: Electric utility regulation; renewable energy portfolio standard program.
  • HB1158: Distributed electric generation; establishment of community solar gardens.
  • HB1198: School buildings; National Register of Historic Places and Virginia Landmarks Register.
  • HB1248: 911 emergency service calls; recordings shall be deemed authentic if with certain information.
  • HB1260: Sexually explicit images; electronic transmission by minors, penalty.
  • HJ11: Constitutional amendment; marriage (first reference).
  • HJ12: United States Constitution; General Assembly to ratify and affirm Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ178: Celebrating the life of Lieutenant Colonel Gerald L. Read, USA (Ret.).
  • HJ179: Commending the Honorable Jonathan Cooper Thacher.
  • HJ181: Celebrating the life of Clifford Scott Hardison.
  • HJ189: Commending Good Shepherd Housing and Family Services, Inc.
  • HJ325: Commending Hybla Valley Elementary School.
  • HJ431: Commending West Potomac High School.
  • HJ436: Celebrating the life of Paul Russell.
  • HJ439: Commending Mount Vernon High School.
  • HJ440: Commending Bucknell Elementary School.
  • HB660: Solar photovoltaic power production projects; VDOT to lease space within highway rights-of-way.
  • HB679: Criminal history information; prohibits sale of person's conviction when record is expunged.
  • HB1908: Commonwealth Transportation Board; changes composition.
  • HB1909: Driving under influence of alcohol; defendant's blood or breath tested, exemplary damages.
  • HB1910: Voter registration; change of address.
  • HB1911: Judicial Council; directed to report on law clerks used by appellate and circuit courts.
  • HB1912: Child custody or visitation; issues may be included in single petition in JDRDC.
  • HB1913: Mechanics' liens; licensed contractors.
  • HB1914: Criminal history record information; unauthorized sale, publication, etc.
  • HB1915: Electronic textbooks; prohibits school board from making available for use by students in residence.
  • HB1916: Income tax, state and corporate; tax credit for solar thermal systems.
  • HB1917: Electric utilities; renewable thermal energy.
  • HB1973: Real Estate Board; death or disability of a broker.
  • HB2011: Urban county executive form of government; abandoned personal property.
  • HB2321: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; State Corporation Commission subject to Act.
  • HB2322: Community Colleges, State Board for; Board shall develop mental health referral policies, etc.
  • HB2323: Motor vehicles; locality may reasonably limit number of title loan businesses, payday lenders, etc.
  • HJ665: Constitutional amendment; repealing amendment dealing with marriage (first reference).
  • HJ666: State renewable energy utility; joint subcommittee to study feasibility of establishing.
  • HJ667: United States Constitution; General Assembly hereby ratifies and affirms Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ668: Constitutional amendment; registration of voters (first reference).
  • HJ792: Commending Stratford Landing Elementary School.
  • HJ873: Commending the Honorable Stewart P. Davis.
  • HJ874: Commending the Honorable Leslie M. Alden.
  • HJ875: Commending the Honorable Marcus D. Williams.
  • HJ876: Commending the Alice Ferguson Foundation.
  • HJ877: Commending Gum Springs.
  • HJ878: Commending Bethlehem Baptist Church.
  • HJ950: Commending Washington Mill Elementary School.
  • HR153: Commending Hollin Hall Senior Center.
  • HB659: Transportation Board; increases number of members.
  • HB660: Solar photovoltaic power production projects; VDOT to lease space within highway rights-of-way.
  • HB661: Workers' compensation benefits; refusal of employment by disabled employee.
  • HB662: Community Colleges, State Board for; development of mental health services.
  • HB663: Child care subsidies; time limits.
  • HB664: Tax credits, state; publication of names on Department of Taxation's website.
  • HB665: Lobbying and finance disclosure; disclosure of gifts and contributions.
  • HB666: General Assembly Conflicts of Interests Act; disclosure requirements.
  • HB667: Political contributions; prohibitions during procurement process.
  • HB668: Condominium and Property Owners' Association Acts; posting of documents on association website.
  • HB669: Absentee voting; persons age 65 and older on day of election may vote absentee.
  • HB670: Voter registration; copy of change of address made at DMV shall be forwarded to Board of Elections.
  • HB671: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • HB672: Community Solar Gardens; created.
  • HB673: Protective orders; Allows general distict court to transfer case to appropriate court.
  • HB674: Protective orders; minor may petition on his own behalf without consent of parent or guardian.
  • HB675: Grand larceny; increases threshold amount from $200 to $500.
  • HB676: Child support; interest on arrearage.
  • HB677: Power of attorney; termination.
  • HB678: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; local towing ordinances.
  • HB679: Criminal history information; prohibits sale of person's conviction when record is expunged.
  • HB680: Driving under influence of alcohol; award of exemplary damages.
  • HB681: Interest on appeal; computed from date of filing notice of to date appellate court issues mandate.
  • HB682: Child custody or visitation; issues may be included in single petition in JDRC; etc.
  • HB683: Courthouses and courtrooms; assessment for security.
  • HJ114: State renewable energy utility; joint subcommittee to study feasibility of establishing.
  • HJ115: United States Constitution; General Assembly of Va. to ratify and affirm Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ211: Commending Major Justin Constantine, United States Marine Corps Reserves.
  • HJ212: Commending Luigi and Anna Maria Tonizzo.
  • HJ214: Celebrating the life of Gilbert S. McCutcheon.
  • HJ229: Defined contribution pension; Va. Congressional Delegation urged to oppose for U.S. Armed Forces.
  • HJ303: Commending Elizabeth Klein.
  • HJ325: Commending Belle View Elementary School.
  • HJ326: Commending Ambassador William Green Miller (Ret.).
  • HJ336: Commending Cynthia N. Hull.
  • HJ397: Commending Eugene J. Coleman III.
  • HJ448: Commending Fort Belvoir.
  • HR4: House of Delegates; recording of standing committee and subcommittee meetings.
  • HR69: Commending Carolyn Gamble.
  • HR505: Commending Heritage Presbyterian Church.
  • HR506: Commending the Mount Vernon Athletic Club.
  • HR511: Celebrating the life of Adelaide Arthur.
  • HB822: Child support, etc.; single petition may be filed in juvenile & domestic relations district court.
  • HB1469: Reckless driving; failing to stop at a school bus.
  • HB1801: Transportation Board; changes composition.
  • HB1802: Personal property tax; classification of certain fuel-efficient motor vehicles.
  • HB1803: Contractors, Board for; provides for certification of home energy auditors.
  • HB1804: House of Delegates; digital recordings of meetings of standing committees and subcommittees.
  • HB1805: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • HB1806: Award of credit; Board of Education to provide an elective credit for applied music study of piano.
  • HB1807: Child custody, etc.; single petition may be filed in juvenile & domestic relations district court.
  • HB1808: Arrearages; payments collected by DSS shall be applied first to interest associated with arrearage.
  • HB1809: Attorneys for State and their assistants; duties.
  • HB1810: Grand larceny; increases threshold amount of money or value of goods.
  • HB1811: Child care services; DSS to identify strategies to increase reimbursement rates.
  • HB2459: Absentee voting; persons age 65 and older will be entitled.
  • HB2460: Political contributions; prohibition during procurement process, penalty.
  • HJ603: U.S. Route 1 Corridor; joint subcommittee to study creation of Corridor.
  • HJ604: Constitutional amendment; repeal of state law or regulation by localities (first reference).
  • HJ905: Commending the Sherwood Regional Library.
  • HJ914: Commending Jeff Todd.
  • HJ957: Commending Walt Whitman Middle School on the occasion of its 50th anniversary.
  • HB818: Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB); composition.
  • HB819: Business entities; when referring to service of process includes any subpoena, summons, etc.
  • HB820: Cigarette tax; penalties for unstamped cigarettes.
  • HB821: Child custody; record of in camera interview.
  • HB822: Child support, etc.; single petition may be filed in juvenile & domestic relations district court.
  • HB823: District court; expungement of police and court records.
  • HB824: Melendez-Diaz notice; 6th Amendment rights to be given to an accused who is proceeding pro se.
  • HB825: Civil or criminal actions; allows circuit court clerks to establish electronic filing.
  • HB826: Electronic summons system; locality to assess an additional sum in district or circuit court.
  • HB827: Electronic recording of court proceedings; circuit & district court clerks have system in courtroom.
  • HB828: Larceny; increases threshold amount of goods that determines petit larceny to grand larceny.
  • HB829: Expert witnesses; extends application of two evidentiary statutes applicable in certain cases.
  • HB830: Food and beverage tax; adds Fairfax County to those that may impose.
  • HB831: Public Procurement Act; foreign & domestic businesses authorized to transact business in State.
  • HB832: Absentee voting; requires election results for central absentee voter precinct to indicate precinct.
  • HB833: Asbestos, Lead, Mold, and Home Inspectors, Board for; regulation of home energy auditors.
  • HB1262: Absentee voting procedures; deletes certain requirements.
  • HJ119: Route 1 Corridor; joint subcommittee to study creation thereof.
  • HJ430: Commending Ventures Outreach, New Hope Housing and the Rising Hope United Methodist Mission church.
  • HJ431: Commending West Potomac High School on the occasion of its 25th anniversary.
  • HJ432: Commending the agencies, companies, organizations, and people who assisted Virginians in the afterma