Sen. Scott Surovell (D-Mount Vernon)

Photo of Scott Surovell
Party
Democratic
District
36: Fairfax County (Part), Prince William County (Part), Stafford County (Part) [map]
Took Office
January 2016
Next Election
November 2019
Committees
Commerce and Labor, Judiciary, Privileges and Elections, Rehabilitation and Social Services, Transportation
Age
50
Website
scottsurovell.org
Twitter
@ssurovell
Copatroning Habits
67% of bills he copatroned were introduced by Democrats. Of all of the copatrons of his bills, 86% of them are Democrats. Of all of the copatrons of all of the bills that he also copatroned, 57% of them are Democrats.
Partisanship
?
Tag Cloud ?
Bills Passed
55.6% in 2020
From the Legislator’s Website

Weekly Column: Redistricting Process Should Involve the Public

November 17, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of November 16, 2021.  Redistricting Process Should Involve the Public                 Last week, I reported on the status of the state legislative and congressional redistricting process which has now moved to the Supreme Court of Virginia because the Virginia Redistricting Commission failed to adopt maps.                  On Friday, the Supreme Court effectively disqualified all three Republican nominees to serve as special master over the redistricting process because of their conflicts of interest and partisan ties.  Specifically, the Court noted that the Republican Caucuses had not advised the Court that one nominee had received a $20,000 payment from the Senate Republican Caucus two months ago and had an express conflict.  The other two nominees were unsuitable as well.  A second nominee received $5,000 per month from the Republican National Committee.  The third Republican nominee has participated in putting together some of the most notorious, court-rejected and illegal racial gerrymanders in American history and lacked credibility according to a federal judge.                 The Court ordered the Republican Caucuses to submit three new nominees by November 17.  One Democratic nominee indicated he did not want to serve in this process so the Court ordered the Democrats to submit an additional name.                  Once the Supreme Court announces the two special masters for the process, the special masters are required to produce maps within 30 days for the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate  and Virginia’s 11 congressional districts.                 At this point, it is not clear how much public comment will be allowed either before or after the maps are published.  The Senate Democratic Caucus has proposed that the Court hold one public hearing before the maps are drawn to consider legal questions and four regional hearings after the maps are published so that the public can provide comments.                 There are several legal points in dispute which resulted in the stalemate at the Virginia Redistricting Commission.  First, Virginia law requires districts to be drawn in a way that does not “unduly favor” any political party.  Notwithstanding the fact that the last election was decided by 70,000 votes of 3.6 million cast, Virginia has been trending in the Democratic direction in recent years.  The Republican caucuses insist that maps be drawn to give either party an equal chance of controlling a chamber.  Democrats argue this would require a partisan gerrymander and by definition would “unduly benefit” the Republican party.                 Second, current law requires maps to be drawn giving consideration to “communities of interest.”  There are questions about the exact legal standard to determine what a community of interest is for purposes of creating district boundaries.  There are also questions regarding the relative weight masters should give to other variables such as compactness, continuity, jurisdiction splits and especially racial composition.  Most districts in Northern Virginia are not majority white, including the 36th Senate District.  Due to ambiguity in recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, there is a lack of clarity regarding the masters’ responsibility to maximize majority non-white districts.                 Redistricting is a fundamental process that will determine who represents you for the next 10 years in the state Senate, House of Delegates and the United States Congress.  The new districts will have a significant impact on the policies adopted in this state and country for the next decade.  It is critical that Virginia conduct this process in a fair and transparent fashion and I am confident, especially with the Virginia Supreme Court’s recent actions, that the special masters will try to be fair.                 However, the special masters will not know all of Virginia well or the nuances of our communities.  I strongly believe that even though this process has moved to the courts, the public should have a clearly defined role and provide input.  However, understandably, I have found most people who do not follow this every day need to see a map before they can comment.  In the coming weeks, there are likely to be proposed maps and opportunities for comment.  I encourage you to participate.  The Supreme Court has ordered that anyone wishing to comment can send an email to Redistricting@vacourts.gov.                  If you have any feedback, please email me at scott@scottsurovell.org.

Thoughts on 2021 Election

November 3, 2021
    Last night's election results were not what I hoped to see, but the voters have spoken and we now have a new political reality to navigate over the next four years.  We saw the highest turnout for a Virginia Governor's election in a long time and that was a good thing.  Many voters took advantage of the new laws we passed in the last two years making it easier to vote and I hope every agrees that democracy works better when more people participate.      Voters in the 36th District voted for the Democratic Ticket by over 20% margin - probably closer to 25% if early votes were counted by precinct.  Only 4 of the 47 precincts I represent voted for the Republican gubernatorial nominee and if early votes were returned to their precincts, probably closers to two.  The Republican message did not resonate with a majority of 36th District voters or for that matter Northern Virginia. Fairfax County voted for Terry McAuliffe by 30% Prince William County for Terry McAuliffe by 28% Stafford County voted for Glenn Youngkin by 30%, but it's Board of Supervisors effectively flipped to Democratic control for the first time in over a decade.      Every legislator in Fairfax County and Prince William County was returned to office and none of the open seats changed control.  I congratulate two new members in Northern Virginia: Briana Sewell who will replace Hala Ayala in the Occoquan part of the 36th District; and Michelle Maldonado who will join our Prince William County General Assembly Delegation.       I also congratulate my returning colleagues who won re-election yesterday who share constituents with me: Delegate Paul Krizek, Delegate Mark Sickles, Delegate Candi King, Delegate Kathy Tran, and Delegate Elizabeth Guzman.      Former-Governor Terry McAuliffe brought important issues to the table, was a consummate team player, and was a very accomplished Governor.  I will miss his passion in Richmond.   It has been an honor to serve and represent Occoquan residents with Delegate Hala Ayala for the last four years and I wish her well in her next endeavor.  Attorney General Mark Herring brought Democratic values to the Attorney General's Office for the first time in twenty-eight years and had important accomplishments in civil rights and modernizing his office.      I am also sorry to lose Delegate Josh Cole in the Stafford County part of my district who was always a refreshing and passionate voice for Stafford County and Fredericksburg, but look forward to working with Supervisor-Elect R. Pamela Yeung who will be the new supervisor in the Garrisonville District of Stafford County.        The House of Delegates appears to have flipped in partisan control after it was forced to run in seats that were drawn as a partisan gerrymander which leaves Northern Virginia short two seats instead of new districts because U.S. Census data came in late.  There are two seats where late received mail-in balance could alter the balance, but that chamber will at-best be evenly divided for the next year.  I would not be surprised if a court orders new elections for next year once the Supreme Court of Virginia has redrawn the seats next month.       I congratulate Glen Youngkin, Winsome Sears and Jason Miyares for putting themselves out there and winning their races.  I look forward to finding common ground and continuing to work on the progress we have made over the last two years making Virginia the best state for business and a leader on climate change, criminal justice reform, and civil rights.  I while Mark Herring has done an incredible job as Attorney General for the last four years, I also look forward to seeing the first JMU-Duke (Jason Miyares) in statewide office.         Mr. Youngkin reached out to me today to emphasize that he looks forward to working together.  I told him that I had a good relationship with Governor McDonnell in the four years I served with him and that I was confident that we could find a way to work together on some issues without compromising our core values.  Do not forget that the process that led to the $1 Billion widening of U.S. 1 and construction of Bus Rapid Transit began with the Route 1 Multimodal Study that Former Governor Bob McDonnell (a former 36th District native) agreed to fund.        I also recognize that many of my constituents and supporters are disappointed by the election results.  I have many thoughts about the outcome.  First, I have always felt that elections should be about the future and what you intend to propose to accomplish.  I did not feel like the last few weeks of the races met that standard and was disappointed by the overall tone of the race.  The continued gridlock in Washington, D.C. continues to leave many frustrated and despondent about the ability of government to achieve real results for people.  I hope Congress looks to how Democrats reached a consensus in Virginia over the last two years and delivered real results for people so that we do not continue to see the kind of collateral damage we saw yesterday.      It is also important to remember that parents do have a voice in their children's education - that's the entire point of Parent-Teacher Associations and Parent-Teacher conferences.  Schools work better when parents are involved in their schools and there are many ways parents can be involved in schools without micromanaging the work of our professionally-licensed teachers.  My parents, children and I are all the product of our public education system and Northern Virginia's public schools are some of the strongest in America.  We can provide a high quality education to all of our students without bringing a political wrecking ball to our school board meetings.       Going forward, I hope to focus on continuing to make investments in transit, finding options for family sick and family leave, finalizing our marijuana legalization discussion, and making Virginia a more equitable and just place to live.  We must continue to fight to make Virginia the best it can be.       Finally, I look forward to the Supreme Court of Virginia's proposed new maps for Senate, House and Congressional Districts that we should expect to see by the middle of December.  There is more change coming to Virginia over the next twelve months and I hope I will continue to earn your trust representing you in Richmond. 

Supporting transit options in Prince William County

October 28, 2021
The Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) released a draft final report Executive Summary of its Springfield to Quantico Enhanced Public Transportation Feasibility Study. DRPT is evaluating: - Metro Expansion in Fairfax County and Prince William County - Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)  - Express Buses - Enhanced VRE  Please make your voice heard on what you want to see for the future of our community.  You can find the proposed Executive Summary here: http://www.drpt.virginia.gov/transit/springfield-to-quantico/ DRPT needs to hear that residents want enhanced public transportation options to prioritize funding. Complete this brief 10-minute survey and have your voice heard about the potential future transit enhancements in Fairfax and Prince William counties. YOUR COMMENTS ARE NEEDED.  Please complete these comment forms, tell the DRPT how critical these projects are for our community and Northern Virginia. As always, please reach out to my office at 571-249-4484 or district36@senate.virginia.gov if you have questions or ideas about things we can do to serve the community better. It is an honor to serve you in Richmond.  Loading…

Weekly Column: State Legislature Decides on Funds, Addresses Needs

August 13, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of August 13, 2021. State Legislature Decides on Funds, Addresses Needs On August 10, the General Assembly completed work in a special session to appropriate federal pandemic funds and elect judges.  In March, President Joe Biden signed the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA).  ARPA brought $4.3 billion in unexpected funds to Virginia but required it to be invested in specific areas such as water, sewer and broadband infrastructure to respond to the COVID-19 emergency, address pandemic impacts and provide government services suffering from revenue reductions because of the pandemic.  Unlike other counties, Fairfax County received $222 million in direct ARPA funding with similar requirements.  Here is how voted to invest most of these funds: ·      $700 million to build “last-mile” broadband and close Virgina’s digital divide over the next three years;  ·         $862 million for Virginia’s Unemployment Trust Fund which was depleted.  Without our action, it would have been forced to assess major unemployment insurance premium increases on small businesses’  ·         $73.6 million to upgrade the Virginia Employment Commission’s systems to improve responses to unemployment claims; ·         $250 million for school heating, ventilation and air conditioning upgrades if localities match those funds, localities that are traditionally charged with funding 100% of school construction costs in Virginia.  ·         $411 million for wastewater treatment infrastructure, including $125 million for the Alexandria, Richmond and Lynchburg combined sewers which currently dump billions of gallons of untreated sewage into the Potomac and James Rivers.  ·         $25 million for the Virginia state park maintenance backlog.  I had hoped to address a statewide $275 million backlog so we can complete work at Stafford County’s Widewater State Park. I will continue to press for this in the Governor’s next budget. ·         $111 million in financial aid for low-income Virginia college students; ·         An historic $250 million investment in our  stressed mental health system;  ·         $120 million for consumer utility assistance; ·         New funds for supportive housing, substance abuse treatment and community crisis systems; ·         $5,000 bonuses for all Virginia State Police (VSP) and state Capitol Police officers and $3,000 bonuses for deputy sheriffs and correctional officers around the state.  We also funded bonuses to alleviate salary compression in the VSP and $5,000 recruitment bonuses with $2,000 recruitment relocation grants. ·         $3 million to improve access to early voting; ·         $4 million for gun violence prevention programs; ·         We also retained $1.1 billion of ARPA funds to appropriate in 2022 contingent upon Delta variant progress. We also passed an amendment requiring the Department of Motor Vehicles to open for in-person service within 30 days. We also worked to reform Virginia’s judicial appellate system.  Prior to our action, Virginia was the only state in America that did not provide a right of appeal to litigants in either criminal or civil cases.  In 2020, I carried a resolution directing the Judicial Council of Virginia to study the issue and that group recommended a change.  I worked with Senate Judiciary Chairman Senator John Edwards to draft the legislation which passed during the regular session. The study recommended that the legislature elect six new judges to handle the case volume generated by creating a right of appeal.  Because of two retirements among existing judges, we had to elect eight new members to the Court.  After a six-month vetting process by nine bar associations that considered 82 applicants, our caucuses vetted candidates and elected eight new members to the Court of Appeals of Virginia. Four new judges will come from Northern Virginia.  This is a welcome development because previously our region had only one member, but we have over 32% of Virginia’s population.  The Court of Appeals has never had a judge from Arlington or Alexandria.  There were no judges on the existing court who lived west of Richmond.  We elected one judge from Charlottesville and one from Roanoke.  Four new judges are African-Americans and four are women.  The existing court had only one minority member and three women.   The new judges represent a diversity of legal expertise, practice areas, life experiences and perspectives and eight judges have not been elected since the Court was created in 1985.  Our action was truly historic and will greatly bolster our judicial system and how it operates. It is an honor to serve you.  Please share your views with me at scott@scottsurovell.org. 

Letter to Constituents - 2021 Session

June 2, 2021
We had a very successful 2021 General Assembly session and we passed many new laws that will be implemented in the coming months and affect those living in the 36th Senate District for decades.  I sent a newsletter that went to many constituents and supporters.  I could not send it every household because of the cost.  If you would like to read the newsletter, I have included it here: As I stated in the letter, it is an honor to serve the people of the 36th District and I am always open to suggestions about what I could be doing better. Please reach out to my office at 571-249-4484 or reply to this email if you have an issue or a policy that I may be able to help improve.

Investing in Southeast Fairfax Infrastructure

May 28, 2021
 Today, Delegates Kathy Tran and Paul Krizek joined me to submit a request to our federal representatives for infrastructure investments in the U.S. 1 corridor. Please read our letter below. We requested funding for undergrounding utilities on U.S. 1 and replacing the obsolete bridge on Old Colchester Road over Giles Run. Our region has long suffered from underinvestment in crucial infrastructure that would spur private sector development and provide necessary access to services for our community. In the coming years, over $1 billion will be invested in the 36th District. The tide is beginning to turn but we have a long way to go.  I am hopeful that the federal government will play a role by investing in these requests. Investments made today will pay dividends for the next generation of U.S. 1 residents and small business owners. Earmark Request for U.S. 1 ... by Scott A. Surovell

Weekly Column: Nominate Mark Herring for Re-Election on June 8

May 16, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of May 17, 2021. Nominate Mark Herring for Re-Election on June 8                 The June 8 Democratic primary is an opportunity to vote for fairness and justice for everyone by supporting Attorney General Mark Herring. On that day, Virginians will select the Democratic Party’s nominees for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General and several Delegates. Republicans controlled the Attorney General’s Office for 28 years until Mark won in 2013.  While many conservatives promote the Attorney General position as Virginia’s “chief prosecutor” and prioritize prosecuting cases, most criminal justice work is done by local Commonwealth’s Attorneys.  Criminal justice work is a small fraction of the Attorney General office’s 400 attorneys and other staff’s work.  Since taking office, Mark has grown the office and refocused it to help all Virginians instead of targeting the poor. Mark has defended legal challenges against our firearm violence prevention laws like our one-gun-a-month law, “red flag” law and universal background checks.  He issued an Attorney General’s opinion to block recognizing weak out-of-state concealed weapon permits.  He also sued to block 3D printed “ghost guns” from hitting the streets.   Attorney General Mark Herring He has defended attacks on the Affordable Care Act’s pre-existing conditions rules after the Trump Administration refused to defend the law.  Mark refused to defend Virginia’s constitutional prohibition on gay marriage.  He sued to protect Planned Parenthood funding and has consistently defended a woman’s right to choose.                  Just this past week, Mark came to Northern Virginia to discuss the status of his investigation of the American Horticultural Society’s (AHS) attempts to sell River Farm to a private owner.  He stressed that he is prepared the use all options to enforce Virginia’s laws prohibiting improper use of restricted donations if AHS does the wrong thing.  He has won victories in court for DREAMers.  He negotiated the largest environmental settlement in state history, secured $1.4 million in fines from Dominion for coal ash water dumping, and prioritized protecting the Bay.  His Medicaid Fraud Unit has recovered over $1 billion for Virginia taxpayers.                 Mark has been a leader on consumer protection.  He created a Predatory Lending Unit to attack the loan sharks who set up shop up and down U.S. 1 until we passed legislation banning them in 2020.  The unit also went after internet lenders like Allied Title Lending, Advance Financial, Opportunity Financial, Net Credit, Money Lion and Mr. Amazing who were charging their “customers” between 273% and 359% interest rates.  He won settlements with Future Income Payments, a lender that targeted elderly and federal pensioners by structuring their loans as “pension sales” that charged up to 183% interest rates.                 Mark has also negotiated settlements against pawnbrokers, pharmaceutical companies, unlicensed contractors, charity scams and robo-dial companies.  Last year, he filed suit against predatory towing companies in Arlington.  Last month, he secured $183 million in refunds for an online ticket seller that refused to refund consumers fees paid for events cancelled due to COVID-19. Recently, Mark filed a groundbreaking suit against an immigrant bond intermediary that mispresents its connection to the federal government and preys on desperate poor immigrants who cannot afford immigration bonds but who instead pay exorbitant fees for GPS ankle monitors that cost thousands of dollars.  Mark partnered with me and other legislators on criminal justice reform.  He proactively established a Civil Rights Unit once the General Assembly gave him the authority that he requested in 2020 to authorize civil rights investigations after the Trump Department of Justice abandoned its responsibilities.                 I know Mark’s opponent and have collaborated with him on legislation.  He is a rising star in the House of Delegates.  But when I partnered with the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus to pass legislation to end predatory lending in 2020, he carried a troubling bill for the Online Lenders Alliance that would have green-lighted an 0.88% daily interest rate resulting in an APR of over 350%.  I dedicated ten years of my legislative service towards ending that practice.  We need Mark Herring to continue the reforms and good work he has done to expand the focus of the Attorney General’s Office on more than criminal justice to many problems Virginians face.  I hope that all Virginians will join me in re-electing him to a third term on June 8 or by voting early.  Please email me at scott@scottsurovell.org if you have any feedback.  

River Farm Update - Attorney General Herring Weighs In

May 14, 2021
We continue meeting among our stakeholder group working out a strategy to maximize the potential that River Farm will remain in public ownership.  Here is what is going on. You can watch the press conference with Attorney General Mark Herring, Supervisor Dan Storck and Delegate Paul Krizek here: River Farm Press Conference With Attorney General Mark Herring News Coverage About River FarmSeveral media outlets covered Attorney General Herring's investigation of River Farm. Some of the top stories are highlighted below: Washington Post: Virginia attorney general says state aims to protect historic River Farm as donor wished Alexandria Living: Officials Investigating River Farm Sale by AHS Washington Business Journal: Virginia could block controversial sale of historic River Farm, attorney general warns WAMU/DCist - VA & DC Investigate The Sale of River Farm for Potentially Breaking State Law American Horticultural Society Board Of Trustees MeetingThe Board of Trustees of the American Horticultural Society is meeting today. Five of 10 members have indicated that they oppose the sale of River Farm. Letter from AHS Trustees About River Farm Grassroots GroupThe Northern Virginia Conservation Trust (NVCT) organized a grassroots effort called Save River Farm to build support and raise private funds to support the purchase of River Farm by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NVRPA).  The website is here - Save River Farm Website If you care about saving River Farm, it is important that you do two things right now: #1 - Sign up for email updates from the group: EMAIL SIGN UP HERE #2 - Donate funds to help build private support.  80% of funds will be used for land acquisition, 10% for public advocacy, and 10% for administration.  Donations are 100% tax deductible. DONATE HERE The NVRPA has also begun the process of seeking up to $2 million in grants from various public sources such as Virginia's Land Conservation Fund, but private support will also be helpful and support from other land trusts will be necessary to complete the transaction. Governor Northam has also written to AHS to work with our group to place River Farm into public ownership.   Letter from Governor Ralph Northam Fairfax County to Restrict Development OptionsThe Fairfax County Board of Supervisors has already placed an historic zoning overlay district on the property and is set to further enhance that district using authority in legislation I passed in the 2021 General Assembly Session.  Supervisor Dan Storck and Chairman Jeff McKay have scheduled the final vote before the Board of Supervisors on June 8. Fairfax County BOS Historic Zoning Overlay Board Matter At this point, over 3,000 people have signed our petition.  Please continue ask friends and neighbors to sign as a show of grassroots power! Thank you for your interest and all of your support.  

How to Bring the Blue Line To Prince William County

April 23, 2021
The Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) is conducting a survey as part of a feasibility study of enhanced public transportation services which could include options such as additional express bus services, increased VRE commuter rail expansion, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), or an extension of Metrorail. This survey closes May 15, 2021. DRPT needs to hear that residents want enhanced public transportation options to prioritize funding. Complete this brief 10-minute survey and have your voice heard about the potential future transit enhancements in Fairfax and Prince William counties. YOUR COMMENTS ARE NEEDED.  Please complete these comment forms, tell the DRPT how critical these projects are for our community and Northern Virginia. Save the date and register to attend the upcoming public meeting on May 4 by using this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcoduygqzksHNwcHLeexgQ39YCNsqj3ZCyw  As always, please reach out to my office at 571-249-4484 or district36@senate.virginia.gov if you have questions or ideas about things we can do to serve the community better. It is an honor to serve you in Richmond. 

Weekly Column: General Assembly Legalizes Limited Adult Possession of Small Amounts of Marijuana

April 12, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of April 12, 2021. General Assembly Legalizes Limited Adult Possession of Small Amounts of Marijuana                This past week, we returned to Richmond for Reconvened Session or Veto Session to consider Governor Northam’s amendments to the state budget and legislation passed during the session.  The Governor vetoed no bills.                The bill that received the most attention was marijuana legalization.  The bill that passed during the session created a new Virginia Cannabis Control Authority and a series of governing and advisory boards.  During the regular session, there were major differences between the chambers.  We eventually agreed on legislation that repealed civil penalties on adult possession of small amounts of marijuana effective January 1, 2024.  After we adjourned, we continued our discussions and eventually Governor Northam’s proposed amendments that moved that date up to July 1, 2021.  This was approved largely along party lines.                   What this means is that after July 1 of this year, adults will be allowed to possess under one once of marijuana.  Possession by persons under 21 will be illegal.  Governor Northam also proposed a series of statutes to treat marijuana like to alcohol which were approved.  Marijuana consumption in public places will be illegal and cannot possessed on school property or in a school bus.  No one can operate a vehicle requiring a commercial driver’s license with marijuana in their system.  Open containers of marijuana in vehicles will be illegal.  However, unlike alcohol, we did not pass legislation allowing parents to allow children to consume.                We also approved legislation allowing people to grow up to marijuana plants at home but only four per household.  Homegrown marijuana must be grown out of sight, must be labelled and the owner must take measures to prevent access by juveniles.                  The legislation also will seal all marijuana possession and misdemeanor distribution charges and convictions on July 1, 2025.  All convictions for possession of paraphernalia and felony marijuana distribution (excluding distribution to juveniles and kingpins) will be eligible to petition for sealing in the discretion of a judge.                   The Governor added money to the budget to enhance training for law enforcement officers in marijuana impairment and also education for juveniles regarding the dangers of marijuana consumption.  We were not able to finalize legislation to create a recreational farming, manufacturing and retail system.  The discussion over whether to allow “vertical” integration between marijuana growers, manufacturers, and retailers such as we currently have with alcohol will continue.  We also must debate whether to allow “horizontal” integration between the hemp and medical industries and recreational marijuana industries.  We also must finalize taxation, distribution of revenues, and social equity programs.                 Governor Northam offered an amendment to place an emergency clause on my legislation to give the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors additional authority to protect River Farm under its historic zoning authority.  It was approved by large margins.  The Governor also proposed a fix to my legislation to reform our laws regarding the sealing of criminal charges by giving the Virginia State Police the authority to allow the process to begin earlier than July 1, 2025 if software systems can be updated faster.  That was approved.                   We also approved appropriations for an independent investigation of a recent dispute an Investigator General Report the Parole Board.  The investigation was requested by minority caucuses and will hopefully bring the dispute to a conclusion.                Governor Northam also proposed giving Prince William County’s local government control over the Virginia Health Department branch in the County.  I did not support making this decision by governor’s amendment versus a publicly vetted bill.  I have concerns about the uncoordinated nature of vaccine deployment in our two current independent health districts, and I wanted to see more vetting, discussion and planning before transferring control.                 We will likely be going back into special session in June to appropriate several billion dollars Virginia will be receiving under the American Rescue Plan and elect seven new judges to the Court of Appeals of Virginia.  We will be vetting and interviewing dozens of candidates over the next two months.  There is only one judge on the Court of Appeals from Northern Virginia.  We must fight for regional diversity on our statewide courts.                It is an honor to serve as your state senator.

Comment on GW Parkway Traffic Safety Changes

April 5, 2021
 As Mount Vernon Residents know, the GW Parkway is a community jewel but has become increasingly dangerous due to vehicle and pedestrian conflicts with increased traffic. Elected leaders in the area have been laser focused on finding solutions and working with the National Park Service (NPS) to make improvements. As part of National Park System, the Virginia Department of Transportation does not have jurisdiction over construction so we have been working closely with our federal representatives - Congressman Beyer and Senators Warner and Kaine. Senator Ebbin, Del. Krizek and I have also written several local news columns about the challenges our constituents face on the Parkway.Surovell: Let’s Work Together to Solve GW Parkway’s Traffic Problem, Fort Hunt Herald (July 15, 2019)‘Parkway Problems Will Get Worse’, Mt. Vernon Gazette, (May 24, 2017) The NPS has been engaged in an ongoing safety study to come with solutions, held two public meetings and solicited comments.  In July of 2019, I wrote comments to the National Park Service with my ideas for how to improve the Parkway. After receiving comments from the community, I sent an updates letter. Both of those letters are posted below.  The NPS just released their proposed safety improvements today.  You can read the full report here: NPS: GW Parkway Traffic And Safety Context Sensitive Solution AssessmentNPS GW Parkway Study Appendices  You can comment on the proposed solutions here: The National Park Service is proposing the following solutions among others on the Parkway:  Develop a program to trim trees and shrubs on a regular basis during the growing season. Initiate education and enforcement measures to reduce excessive speeds, including Speed management action plan Public awareness campaign of the Parkway in a national context Enforce speeds via manual and automated methods. Reapply the pavement markings for improved conspicuity and develop a plan to reapply markings on a regular basis. Reevaluate crash data collection within the corridor. Detailed crash data provides significant value in understanding crash causes along with demonstrating the impacts of implemented solutions. Install mumble strips to keep vehicles on the roadway. Use dynamic message signs to alert drivers to the presence of wildlife along the corridor from Belle Haven Road to Waynewood Boulevard. The signs are recommended from mid-October through the end of November and between 5:30 p.m. and 9:00 a.m. The signs could remain dark outside of these periods to increase conspicuity. Develop a public awareness educational campaign starting at the end of March to remind motorists about the increasing presence of pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists who are also using the corridor. The following are key recommendations that are above and beyond the global recommendations by intersection: Belle Haven Road Channelize left turns in the median. Create an acceleration lane at the U-turn location at Belle Haven Marina. Belle View Boulevard Implement a median U-turn. Tulane Drive Implement a roundabout while retaining the high-quality access to the Mount Vernon Trail that currently exists (e.g., investigate the possibility of a pedestrian/bicycle roundabout outside of the vehicular roundabout). Morningside Lane, Wellington Road, Collingwood Road, Waynewood Boulevard, and Vernon View Drive Implement a road diet throughout these intersections to calm vehicle speeds and provide a center turn lane.  Reduce southbound traffic to one lane from Tulane Drive to Stratford Landing and use the former lane for dedicated left turns. For Wellington Road, implement a rectangular rapid flash beacon with a refuge island to address pedestrian/bicyclist crossings. Based on the recommendations in this study, the National Park Service plans to implement a road diet between four intersections (Morningside Lane, Wellington Road, Waynewood Boulevard, and Vernon View Drive) in 2021. This plan includes signs and striping to calm vehicle speeds and provide a center turn lane. Additionally, the National Park Service will improve signs and striping to five MVT crossings (Belle Haven Marina, Wellington Road, Collingwood Road, Waynewood Boulevard, and Fort Hunt Road). NPS-proposed road diet - taking southbound traffic to one lane to allow turn lane Proposed roundabout at Morningside Lane - not under NPS consideration for 2021 Proposed enhanced pedestrian crossing and road diet at Wellington Road Here are two letters that I wrote to NPS expressing our community's ideas about the Parkway in 2019: Senator Scott Surovell Init... by Scott A. Surovell Second public comment letter with data from over 500 constituent comments. Senator Scott Surovell'... by Scott A. Surovell Submit your comments here:Loading… I have asked the NPS for a public hearing to raise further awareness about the proposed changes and provide further opportunity for feedback.  Please complete my form above to provide your thoughts.  

New Opportunities For Virginia's Oldest Town

April 3, 2021
In February, Colonial Downs announced a $389 million resort gaming emporium complex in Dumfries called “The Rose.” It has the potential to transform the Town of Dumfries and is part of a larger effort to transform Eastern Prince William County into a series of waterfront mixed-use villages and parks connected by the extension of the Blue Line and the Virginia Railway Express, including Occoquan, Belmont, Potomac Shores, Dumfries and Quantico.   Twenty years from now, these communities will become destination neighborhoods that anchor Prince William County’s social fabric and tax base and connect Northern Virginians to the Potomac River in ways we can only imagine today. These opportunities are possible due to major infrastructure investments by the General Assembly. In 2013, we voted to raise transportation taxes as part of a bipartisan compromise to raise funds for new infrastructure in Northern Virginia. The Northern Virginia Transportation Authority allocated $85 million of that revenue to realign U.S. 1 through Dumfries and add sidewalks, multi-use paths and give Dumfries a new and modern Main Street.  Second, the eventual construction of the Long Bridge will enable much more robust daily VRE service outside of commuting hours. Communities near VRE stations will become magnets for the D.C. Metropolitan Area’s workforce.  Third, The Rose will replace the Dumfries landfill with a hotel, conference center, eight restaurants and 79-acre park for community residents. George Mason University estimates that it is projected to generate $48 million in taxes every year including $10.9 million to Dumfries and $6.7 million to Dumfries. To put that number in perspective, Dumfries’ 2021 budget included a general fund revenue total of $5.6 million. The proposed gaming emporium represents a 200% increase in revenue for the town without raising any taxes.  The GMU analysis estimates 640 new jobs with an average pay of $15 per hour and more than 100 jobs at The Rose will pay an average of $70,000 per year. All of these jobs would pay families more than the town’s current median family income of $63,000.  Over 10 years, the project will generate $100 million for the town and $60 million for the county. These funds could be used to dredge Quantico Creek and develop a waterfront, provide new parks or services to residents, underwrite affordable housing, construct new infrastructure and attract new development. A decade from now, Dumfries could be Prince William County’s premiere waterfront village. Concerns that this project will profit from town residents are misplaced. The MGM Grand Casino at National Harbor, in Maryland, sucks $150 million out of Virginia every year. The majority of MGM’s patrons come from Virginia. The GMU study found that The Rose represents an opportunity to recapture some of that Virginia money and keep it here in Virginia and Prince William County.  The Rose will also create opportunities to keep community events in Prince William County, attract conferences and leverage tourist opportunities to our parts of Northern Virginia through needed conference space.  Just to the north, the new Museum of the U.S.  Army at Fort Belvoir is projected to attract 800,000 visitors per year while The National Museum of the U.S. Marine Corps sees 500,000 per year. We need those visitors to eat and sleep in Prince William County’s waterfront instead of Old Town Alexandria. The coming developments will keep them here. Over the last four years, we have worked hard together to lay the legal groundwork necessary to provide opportunities to Northern Virginia by authorizing additional gaming opportunities in jurisdictions willing to embrace it. In November 2019, Dumfries voters approved a referendum to allow gaming, and the message sent by residents has been received. While Dumfries is the oldest continuously chartered town in Virginia and once rivaled New York, Philadelphia and Boston as an East Coast port, it has not seen the same revitalization that has come to City of Manassas and the towns of Haymarket and Occoquan. The Rose presents a generational revitalization opportunity for Eastern Prince William County made possible by the collective effort of the town council and the state legislature. We look forward to the community discussion and are optimistic that the greater community will see the virtue in the project after public hearings. 

Weekly Column: Major Bills of the 2021 Session

March 24, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of March 24, 2021.                  Last week, I wrote about the legislation I carried in the 2021 Session.  In this column, I focus on other major bills that were considered.                 Marijuana legalization consumed a huge amount of work this session.  Governor Northam put together a work group that proposed a 13,000-line, 264-page bill that was very comprehensive and carried by Senator Adam Ebbin.  However, it became clear very early in the session that it was going to be very difficult to consider all of the details and much of the bill was carried over.                 We have many issues to work out.  Specifically, there were concerns about how much cross-ownership to allow between growers, manufacturers and retailers or whether to allow licensees in our medical markets to participate in retail markets or whether to allow hemp growers to also grow marijuana.  We need to consider whether or how to allow people to grow marijuana in their homes.  We also need to discuss creating a licensing structure which allows all communities to grow wealth and share in the profits and not just well capitalized companies.                 In the end, we passed legislation to repeal Virginia’s law prohibiting under one once of marijuana effective January 1, 2024 and pushed off the remainder of decisions to next year.  It is possible some of this could be revisited in Governor Northam’s amendments.                 We approved Delegate Lamont Bagby’s bill that gave the Virginia Air Board the authority for us to join California Air Emissions with over a dozen other states.  This will create incentives for Virginia automobile dealers to lower prices to sell more electric vehicles.  While Virginia is 13th in electric vehicle registrations and 11th in charging stations, we have a long way to go to electrify our car fleet and this will be a huge step.  Legislation prohibiting Styrofoam passed, but it will not be effective for a few years.                  Voting rights continued to be a major focus.  We started the process of removing Virginia’s Jim Crow Era prohibition on felon voting and instead replaced it with language creating an affirmative right to vote and automatic voting restoration process.  We passed one of the first voting rights acts in the country which will give the Attorney General authority to sue localities that attempt to restrict voting rights.  We also codified balloting drop boxes, absentee curing processes, eliminated the absentee witness requirement, and required early voting to be open on Sundays.                 We passed legislation making financial aid available to Dreamers, prohibiting the “gay panic defense” in criminal cases, and passing a resolution to start the process of removing Virginia’s gay marriage from our Constitution.                  Legislation prohibiting guns are polling places passed, and we codified the ban on guns inside the Capitol of Virginia and on Capitol Square.  We were unable to pass a bill prohibiting plastic, gun kits or “ghost guns,” but will take that up again next session.                 We strengthened our health care exchange by creating a reinsurance program that will lower insurance costs for high risk Virginians in the exchange.  Also, legislation requiring Virginia’s healthcare exchange to cover abortion services passed as well.  No taxpayer money will fund these services.                 Many parents reached out about schools remaining closed and legislation requiring schools to be open for in-person classes this fall passed with large bipartisan margins.  We need to get our kids back in the classroom.                 We also extended the temporary regulation allowing restaurants to sell cocktails to-go.  Go out and get a quart of margaritas to take home.                 Finally, last session, I carried legislation to study giving all Virginians an appeal of right in all civil and criminal cases.  We are the only state in America without it.  The Virginia Judicial Council approved my idea, and legislation expanding the Court of Appeals to achieve it passed as well.                 Governor Northam is now considering his amendments or vetoes to bills.  They will be announced on March 31, 2021.  It is also looking very likely that we will need to have a special session to appropriate approximately $8 billion coming from the federal government and pick seven new appellate judges and their replacements.                 It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  Send me any feedback at scott@scottsurovell.org.

Saving River Farm Update #5

March 22, 2021
Our efforts to save historic River Farm are intensifying.  The 28-acre, Potomac riverfront property is a rare jewel in Northern Virginia that should be saved and not developed. In November, the current owner, the American Horticultural Society (AHS) listed River Farm on the market for $32.9 million.  This value was presumably premised on an appraisal that assumed the  property could be significantly subdivided.  In reality, River Farm is protected by a two-acre easement with the National Park Service (NPS) on its East Boulevard Drive frontage and a ten-acre easement along the Potomac River frontage that was granted to the Virginia Outdoors Foundation in 1978.    The NPS easement only allows a “driveway” and prohibits a road without NPS approval, which means the remaining 16 acres could only be subdivided into three lots and not a three-house-per- acre development as some assume.  The Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NVRPA) got an alternate and more realistic appraisal.  Based on that, the NVRPA made an offer to purchase the property for about half the AHS announced price. AHS refused the offer and has not countered at this time.  You can read their explanation here: AHS Rejection Press Release AHS claims they are selling the property because of cash flow problems, but they have spent thousands on legal fees and a public relations firm.  Also, as highlighted in a recent Washington Post story, they do not appear to have liquidity problems, according to their publicly available financial statements. Urgent Efforts Underway to Preserve Historic River Farm as Public Land, Washington Post (Mar. 14, 2021)  At this point, our team of elected officials is well on our way to securing $7-8 million in grants and other funding to enable a purchase the property that would preserve it.  Senator Adam Ebbin and Delegate Paul Krizek successfully amended the state budget with the help of Delegate Mark Sickles to include $2 million.  The Virginia Land Conservation Foundation (VLCF) has provided an initial grant of $150,000.  An additional $1.5 million grant application is pending along with an application to the Virginia Outdoors Foundation.  It is also possible to raise an additional $3-4 million through an additional Virginia Land Conservation Tax Credit with the consent of the landowner.  Altogether, the state could potentially fund 50 percent of the purchase price through grants and credits and the remaining funds would have to come from Fairfax County or private sources. Supervisor Dan Storck and Chairman Jeff McKay have proposed a historic zoning overlay district to protect the architectural resources on the property and its historic character.  The Fairfax County Planning Commission unanimously approved the overlay district last week on a 12-0 vote. Over 60 local residents testified in support. The Board of Supervisors will consider it on April 13. In addition, in the recent General Assembly session, I passed legislation to give Fairfax County the additional authority to prohibit subdividing River Farm and to require public access to the property as part of an historic zoning overlay district.  You can read my bill here: SB1457 – Historic Sites, Urban County Executive Form of Government With the Board of Supervisors’ agreement, I have asked Governor Ralph Northam to place an emergency clause on the bill so the county can use this authority starting in April instead of July.  Governor Northam previously wrote a letter supporting saving River Farm so I am optimistic that he will agree.  Over 3,000 people have signed my petition and provided comments asking that River Farm be preserved as a public park.  Please ask people to sign the petition so we can show AHS and all elected officials the depth of community support. The Northern Virginia Conservation Trust (NVCT) has set up an account to accept tax-deductible donations towards the purchase of River Farm and they are leading a media campaign.  You can read more about that here: Save River Farm Campaign  Finally, the Attorney General of the District of Columbia and Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring are jointly investigating AHS’s decision to sell River Farm.  Enid Annenberg Haupt gave $1 million to AHS conditioned on the money being used to purchase River Farm and keep it open to the public.  State and federal law prohibit charities from using their restricted funds in ways that contradict the donors’ intent.  Many people ask me what they can do to help.  Here is what you can do: #1 - Make a tax-deductible donation to help raise funds to purchase River Farm here: Donate to Save River Farm #2 - Sign my petition and get others to sign and comment. I will deliver my signatures to each member of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors before their vote on the River Farm historic zoning overlay ordinance so they understand the strong community support for saving River Farm.  You can sign here: Sign Petition to Save River Farm Thank you for your interest and all of your support.  

House/Senate Announcement for Judicial Vetting for Court of Appeals of Virginia

March 15, 2021
Court of Appeals of Virginia Senate Judiciary Committee Chair John Edwards and House Courts of Justice Committee Chair Charniele Herring have released the following letter regarding the process for vetting for seven vacancies on the Court of Appeals of Virginia. Interested applicants should apply for vetting as set forth in the letter. Court of Appeals of Virgini... by Scott A. Surovell

Weekly Column: The State Legislature’s Recent Session Was Consequential

March 8, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of March 5, 2021. The State Legislature’s Recent Session Was Consequential The 2021 General Assembly session has ended until we reconvene in April to consider any vetoes by Governor Ralph Northam.  This session was a consequential one.  In this column, I will report on some of the bills that I passed.  In future columns, I will report on other major legislation passed and then the budget.                I introduced 12 bills and 12 budget amendments this session.  The Senate passed 10 bills eight of my bills are awaiting Governor Ralph Northam’s signature.                My legislation abolishing capital punishment was one of the most daunting and rewarding bills I have ever sponsored.  Working with my colleagues to secure 21 votes to pass it in the Senate without having to make compromises was a challenge, but it was necessary to avoid causing additional harm to our system.  Through the process, no opponent answered why it is morally justifiable for the government to kill one innocent person for every nine guilty people, which is what most studies show.                 Both houses passed my legislation modernizing Virginia’s criminal records expungement and sealing system.  Today, Virginia is one of nine states that does not allow sealing of misdemeanor convictions and one of 14 that does not allow sealing of felony convictions after a period of good behavior.  Our reforms will give 1.6 million Virginians the opportunity to move beyond their past and support their families after paying their dues and following the law.                I carried two bills specific to the 36th District.  One bill will give the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors the ability to prevent subdividing the land at River Farm and require the property owner to continue to provide public access as part of a future historic zoning overlay district.  Enid Haupt gave $1 million to the American Horticultural Society to buy River Farm and keep it open to the public.  This law will force the owners to keep their promises.                Senate Bill 1385 enhances Fairfax County’s authority to enact a tax on electricity to raise the funds to underground utilities in the U.S. 1 corridor and the remainder of Fairfax County.  Several Board of Supervisors members told me that it is important to prevent utility undergrounding projects from competing with schools and parks for funding.  This bill achieves that goal.                One in four residents of the 36th District was born in another country and one in four is Latino.  Senate Bill 1181 harmonizes state and federal law regarding Special Immigrant Juvenile Status which gives legal status to abused, abandoned or neglected children.  My bill allows children to obtain findings in state courts up until age 21 instead of age 18, as current law provides.  Another bill, Senate Bill 1468 creates a structure for immigrant crime victims, human trafficking victims and their families to apply for certifications from local law enforcement officials to obtain U or T Visas from the Federal Government.  Some Virginia law enforcement officers refuse to provide these certifications or delay issuing them to leverage victims. I passed legislation raising Virginia’s auto insurance minimum policy limits for the first time since 1974.  Virginia’s limits will match Maryland’s starting January 1, 2022, and then move to $50,000 on January 1, 2025.  If these limits had kept up with regular inflation, they would be at $125,000 or $220,000 if you use medical inflation.  In Europe, the minimum insurance policy is one million Euros.  This legislation will ensure that if someone is in a collision, their property is damage or if they are hurt, the person at fault will be more likely to pay instead of your own insurance.                 Four of my bills did not pass, but I will try again in the next session.  I am most disappointed that my legislation to allow class action lawsuits did not succeed.  It has now died in the House of Delegate twice.  Virginia and Mississippi are the only two states in America that do not allow class actions.                It is an honor to serve as your state senator.  

Weekly Column: River Farm Protected and Criminal Record Sealing Compromise

February 23, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 22, 2021.  River Farm Protected and Criminal Record Sealing Compromise                The last week of the 2021 General Assembly Session has arrived and it will prove to be an exciting time with many big issues on the agenda.                In even years, the process of amending the Constitution of Virginia typically begins.  Senator Adam Ebbin and Delegate Mark Sickles legislation repealing the 2006 gay marriage ban from our constitution will have a final vote.  We are also negotiating an amendment to remove Virginia’s Jim Crow Era felony voting prohibition from the Constitution and replacing it with an affirmative right to vote.   We will also be taking up my legislation abolishing capital punishment on Monday.    This past week we announced our agreement on my legislation to reform Virginia’s expungement and rules prohibiting the sealing of criminal convictions.  Virginia is one of only nine states in America that does not allow people to seal misdemeanor convictions and one of only fourteen that do not allow the sealing of felony convictions.  My legislation creates a process for most misdemeanors and felonies, allows access to records for sensitive positions, and also reduces barriers to accessing the process by providing court-appointed counsel, reducing procedural hurdles, and creating a process for automatic expungement after seven years of good behavior of alcohol or marijuana possession, disorderly conduct, trespassing, and petit larceny.  Importantly, the bill also creates a registry for private data brokers and liability for companies who continue to publish information relating to sealed convictions.                 My proposal to provide all Virginians with a right of appeal in all civil and criminal cases was finally docketed and taken up in the House of Delegates.  Virginia is the only state in America that does not provide this right and giving it will require seven new judges on the Court of Appeals.  I am hopeful that the details will be resolved by the end of the week.                 The House of Delegates passed my legislation to help give Fairfax County more authority to protect River Farm.  My legislation makes it clear that the County can restrict subdivision and require public access as part of any historic zoning district over River Farm.  I am hope that Chairman Jeff McKay and Supervisor Dan Storck can convince their colleagues to utilize this authority to help ensure River Farm remains preserved and open to the public in perpetuity.                 The House rejected by legislation to allow class action lawsuits in Virginia.  Virginia and Mississippi are the only two states in America without this remedy which helps to level the playing field between large corporations and citizens, but some members refused to consider the bill.                 A House Committee also killed my bill to allow local governments to request information about a company’s history of arbitrating sexual harassment, racial discrimination and consumer complaints before entering into contracts with bidders.  Companies are using these practices to hide shameful behavior from the public and companies who choose to allow their employees to litigate these matters in court are at a strategic disadvantage.  I will try again next year.                The negotiations to work on marijuana legalization will start this week.  Senator Adam Ebbin is carrying the legislation, Delegate Paul Krizek spent significant time vetting the legislation.  The Senate has taken the position that we need more time to study the bill to get legalization done correctly while the House of Delegates would like to move forward this year.  We have a large chasm to bridge.                 Finally, our money committee leadership will works towards resolving our competing budgets.  Last week, Governor Northam announced that revenues were $750 million higher than expected, but still $3 billion lower when the budgets were originally build before the pandemic.                 Please email me at scott@scottsurovell.orgif you have any difficulty obtaining a vaccine appointment and complete my constituent survey at www.scottsurovell.org/survey.  It is an honor to serve as your state senator.

Ice Storm Impacts Roads and Vaccination Clinics: Here's What You Need to Know

February 18, 2021
Several law enforcement and emergency services agencies in Northern Virginia are asking drivers to avoid the roads today as snow, ice and sleet sweep through the region. The Virginia Department of Transportation is also recommending that drivers stay off the roads today. Reporting a Power Outage  If you experience an outage there are three easy ways to report it to Dominion Energy:  By Phone: 866-366-4357 Download the New Dominion Energy app [Click Here] On Their Website [Click Here] Snow Removal  Due to COVID-19 restrictions that protect the safety of plow workers, it’s possible that plowing might take longer than usual this year. To track when your neighborhood will be plowed, visit the Virginia Department of Transportation’s (VDOT) plowing website, which activates after 2 inches of snow have accumulated in your county. If you live on a private street, it is the responsibility of the developers or the homeowner’s association to arrange for the street to be cleared. Call 800-FOR ROAD (800-367-7623) for information on snow removal or to inform VDOT of any snow removal problems. TTY users can call 711. COVID-19 Vaccine Appointments Cancelled, To Be Rescheduled Fairfax County The COVID-19 vaccine clinics scheduled at the Fairfax County Government Center and the four Health Department District office sites on Thursday, Feb. 18 are cancelled. People who have appointments will receive an email informing them of the cancellation. The cancellation notice will contain a link to reschedule their appointment for clinics scheduled during the upcoming week. Please note that appointment locations may be at a different site than you were originally scheduled for. Residents who need assistance in rescheduling their appointment may call the COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline at 703-324-7404, though the call center is also closed Feb. 18. Click Here to Read the Full Press Release by Fairfax County Government ‘Winter Weather Impacts Health Department Vaccine Clinics Thursday, Feb. 18’ Prince William County  Prince William Health District (PWHD) COVID vaccination clinics at Potomac Middle School and Manassas Mall are canceled due to expected snow and ice. Please check your email for additional information: to reschedule your appointment, please contact the Prince William Health District call center after 9:00 AM Thursday, at 703-872-7759. Please have available your ID number to reschedule your appointment for next week. Read Full Press Release from the Virginia Department of Health ‘Winter Storm Closes PWHD’s Vaccine Clinics for Thursday, Feb. 18’ 

Weekly Column: Finding Solutions in the General Assembly

February 15, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 15, 2021. Finding Solutions in the General Assembly  Both the Senate of Virginia and the House of Delegates have released proposed budgets and we will vote on the budget soon.  We are also working to resolve some complex bills and to accelerate vaccinations. Vaccination Progress                Health care providers have administered over 1.2 million covid-19 vaccinations in Virginia as of February 12, nine of ten available first doses.  As of last week, that means that Virginia ranked seventh among states as a proportion of our population.   The state also announced a unified vaccination scheduling system although Fairfax County chose to opt out.  Virginia is now receiving 129,000 doses per week which is up 23 percent from our initial allocation.  We have also expanded the vaccination program to 36 CVS drugstores around the state.  We expect the pace to pick up once the Food and Drug Administration approves the new single-shot vaccines.    Back to School, River Farm, Mason Neck On Wednesday, both chambers announced amendments to our two-year budget.  Fortunately, revenues have been better than anticipated.  The Senate budget includes a three percent raise for teachers and a requirement that school systems hold in-person instruction during the 2021-22 school year.  We also included language to prevent local school systems from losing funding if families have removed their children from the public schools.   Senator Adam Ebbin and Delegate Paul Krizek secured funding in both the Senate and House budgets to provide at least $2 million to help purchase River Farm.  My $1.6 million amendment to fund a public water connection for Mason Neck State Park was accepted.  Delegate Kathy Tran secured the same provision in the House which is promising.  Managing Criminal Records                Because the minority refused to extend our “short” session to 46 days, we had to formally move legislation from the regular session to the special session.   This forced us to take two days off which gave us some addition time to collaborate to resolve some important disputes.  On Tuesday, I met in the Governor’s Office with approximately ten legislators and the Governor’s policy staff to resolve an impasse on the expungement or sealing of convictions and records relating to certain dismissals of criminal charges.  I am very optimistic that we will be able to announce a compromise that will provide hope to the 1.6 million Virginians who have a misdemeanor or felony conviction but served their sentence and have long since moved on and led law-abiding lives.  Enacting this bill will help people move beyond their past and support their families and will also give employers a bigger pool of employees. The Senate also accepted my amendment that requires Virginia’s Compensation Board to revamp staffing formulas for the state’s Commonwealth’s attorneys.  Today, staffing is determined solely based on felony counts indicted and convictions obtained which incentivizes prosecutors to overcharge and over convict people.  My amendment will set new standards. The Senate also agreed to increase and retain about $35 million that I requested to fund the computer infrastructure necessary to facilitate the expungement and sealing reforms and my initiative to expand the Court of Appeals of Virginia by seven judges.  Virginia is the only state in America in which litigants to do not have a right of appeal after a civil or criminal case and more judges are necessary to help with the new cases. Our budget also prioritizes $136 million to extend rail service to the New River Valley in southwest Virginia. This means you might be able to take a train to Virginia Tech in Blacksburg soon.  The budget also reallocates $3.9 million per year saved from abolishing capital punishment to a public defender office for Chesterfield County and new public defender appellate positions.  A public defender will help provide thousands of people with enhanced legal defense instead of just a handful of people. Please continue to respond to my constituent survey at www.scottsurovell.org/survey.  It is an honor to serve as your state senator. 

2021 COVID-19 Update Thread

February 10, 2021
The Virginia Department of Health has created a webpage dedicated solely to virus updates where you will find content that is updated daily. The CDC also has a dedicated website:  Virginia Department of Health Center for Disease Control Click Here to Find Testing Locations in Prince William County (Updated Regularly) Register online to receive a vaccine at: https://vaccinate.virginia.gov/ ***UPDATE FRIDAY, 4/23/21 at 12:00 PM*** Covid Restriction Updates Governor Northam issued Fifth Amended Executive Order 72 as follows, effective April 21. These activities are still subject to updated guidance, including capacity limits and other safety requirements: Seating is now permitted in bar areas of restaurants, provided at least 6 feet is maintained between parties and no standing congregation is permitted. Outdoor races and marathons may place runners in staggered groups of up to 100 (up from 50). School theatrical and musical performances may allow patrons up to 30% of the venue capacity, with a maximum of 500 patrons indoors and no specific limit outdoors. Distancing requirements have been decreased from 10 feet to 6 feet for entertainment and public amusement venues, swimming pool seating, graduations, and recreational sporting events. Personal care and personal grooming studios are no longer required to maintain appointment logs and contact information for customers. Karaoke is no longer prohibited. Splash pads, hot tubs, and saunas are no longer prohibited. Brass instrument players may remove masks while playing, as could wind instrument players previously. Full Amended Executive Order 72 Restriction updates changing May 15: Capacity limits at entertainment venues will increase from 30% to 50%, with an increase in the maximum number of indoor patrons from 500 to 1,000 and no specific limit on the number of outdoor patrons. Capacity limits at recreational sports venues will increase from 30% to 50%, with a maximum of 250 spectators per field for indoor events and 1,000 spectators per field for outdoor events. The limit on social gatherings will increase from 50 to 100 indoors and from 100 to 250 outdoors. Alcohol sales and restaurant dining will be permitted after midnight. More Information and Frequently Asked Questions The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidance on March 8 about what people can do when they are fully vaccinated (which occurs two weeks after their final vaccine dose), and guidance on April 2 about travel by people who are fully vaccinated. The guidance notes that because public health researchers are still learning how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19, even people who are fully vaccinated should keep taking precautions in public places like wearing masks, staying 6 feet apart from others, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces. Guidance from CDC for Fully Vaccinated People Get Vaccinated! About a third of vaccine doses in Virginia are now being administered by retail pharmacy locations, which are open to anyone age 16 or older. Individuals may visit VaccineFinder.org to find eligible pharmacy locations, hours, phone numbers, and scheduling links where available.  ***UPDATE Thursday, 4/1/21 at 3:00 PM*** Vaccine Eligibility Governor Ralph Northam today announced that all individuals in Virginia age 16 and older will be eligible to get the COVID-19 vaccine starting on Sunday, April 18, ahead of the May 1 nationwide goal set by President Joe Biden. Governor Northam made the announcement during a visit to a vaccination clinic at First Mount Zion Baptist Church in Prince William County, where more than 1,000 vaccines will be administered today. This news comes as nearly every Virginian in the highest risk groups who has pre-registered for a vaccination appointment has received one, and those still on the pre-registration list will receive appointment invitations within the next two weeks. Register online to receive a vaccine at: vaccinate.virginia.gov/ Gathering Limitation Changes: Beginning on Thursday, April 1, restrictions ease as follows: Increase in number of people at social gatherings: Social gatherings will increase to 50 people for indoor settings and 100 people for outdoor settings.  Currently, social gatherings are limited to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. Recreational sporting events: For indoor settings, the number of spectators at recreational sporting events will increase from 25 to 100 people per field or 30 percent capacity, whichever is less. Outdoor settings will increase from 250 to 500 people per field or 30 percent capacity, whichever is less for outdoor settings. In-person graduation and commencement events: Gov. Northam’s preliminary guidance on safe in-person graduations and commencements, for outdoor events, include a cap of 5,000 people or 30 percent of the venue capacity, whichever is less. Events held indoors may have up to 500 people, or 30 percent of the venue capacity, whichever is less. Attendees must wear masks and follow safety protocols to ensure proper distancing. Full Text Of Updated Executive Order 72 Vaccines in Prince William County Please note: the PWHD call center will be closed on Sunday, April 4 in observance of Easter. The Community Vaccination Center (CVC) which is a mass vaccination site is operating out of the former Gander Mountain store, located at, 14011 Worth Avenue, Woodbridge, VA 22192.  If you have an Official Appointment or Invitation to the Community Vaccination Center (CVC) located at the former Gander Mountain store in Woodbridge, here are a few guidelines to follow: Arrive no more than 15 minutes before your appointment. You cannot enter the building early to receive your vaccine. No walk-ins are accepted at this time. Please pre-register to be contacted for an appointment. Please have a copy of your invitation (email, text, barcode) or other proof of your name ready when you arrive at the site. PWHD Clinic Manassas Mall located at 8300 Sudley Rd, Manassas, VA 20109  is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. from Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, on Thursday from 1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. This clinic is administering the Moderna vaccine. Vaccinations in Fairfax County Fairfax County plans to open up registrations for Phase 1c early next week and transition to Phase 2 by April 18. As part of President Biden’s new 90/90 agenda for the nation, we expect greater access to vaccines as more local pharmacies begin to participate in the federal pharmacy vaccination program.   The Health Department is also highlighting Pfizer-BioNTech’s announcement about results of their Phase 3 trial in adolescents 12-15 years of age, which showed their vaccine to be safe and 100% effective in preventing illness. Pfizer is also studying how well the vaccine works in children ages 6 months to 11 years old.  More registration data is now available on the County’s dashboard Vaccination Locations in the Fairfax Health District COVID-19 Related Funeral Cost Assistance Available from FEMA Virginia COPES The federally funded Virginia Crisis Counseling Program is called Virginia C.O.P.E.S. which stands for compassionate, optimistic, person-centered, empowering support. Our program is part of the federal and state behavioral health response to the current state of emergency. Our main focus is supporting the mental and emotional well-being of those impacted by the pandemic as well as directing callers to community resources. More information can be found at: vacopes.com and on our Facebook page (facebook.com/vacopescovid). Crisis Counselors are available during the following times to take calls: Monday-Friday 9am-9pm and on Saturday-Sunday from 5pm-9pm. VA C.O.P.E.S can be reached by phone or text at 877-349-6428.  Spanish speaking counselors are available. We have additional translations services available for individuals who speak Mandarin, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Urdu, Korean, or Arabic. Crisis Counselors are available during the following times to take calls: Monday-Friday 9am-9pm and on Saturday-Sunday from 5pm-9pm. VA C.O.P.E.S can be reached by phone or text at 877-349-6428.  Spanish speaking counselors are available. We have additional translations services available for individuals who speak Mandarin, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Urdu, Korean, or Arabic. VA C.O.P.E.S. counselors are prepared to refer and provide additional information for callers as well but should not be utilized as an emergency or suicide hotline.  ***UPDATE Friday, 2/26/21 at 12:30 PM*** Fairfax and Prince William Counties Continue Through COVID-19 Vaccination Phase 1b; Governor Northam Loosens COVID-19 Restrictions Fairfax County Fairfax County is continuing to distribute COVID-19 vaccinations to those eligible in Phase 1b according to the guidelines set by the Virginia Department of Health.  As of February 25th, Fairfax County has administered a total of 155,497 doses of the vaccine, including first and second doses. More data about vaccine distribution can be found here. Am I eligible? Under current guidelines, the groups eligible for vaccination in Fairfax County include: Adults 65+ who live in Fairfax County, the cities of Fairfax or Falls Church, or the towns of Herndon, Vienna or Clifton People ages high-risk medical condition or disability that increases their risk of severe illness from COVID-19 who live in Fairfax County, the cities of Fairfax or Falls Church, or the towns of Herndon, Vienna or Clifton People living in correctional facilities, homeless shelters and migrant labor camps The following Frontline Essential Worker Priority Groups who live or work in Fairfax County, the cities of Fairfax or Falls Church, or the towns of Herndon, Vienna or Clifton Police, fire and hazmat (Frontline Essential Worker Group Priority #1) Corrections and homeless shelter workers (Frontline Essential Worker Group Priority #2) Childcare/K-12 Teachers/Staff (Frontline Essential Worker Group Priority #3), including staff serving public and private schools; licensed center-based childcare staff and licensed home-based childcare staff How do I get the vaccine? By phone: Call the Health Department’s vaccine hotline at 703-324-7404 (Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to register for an appointment or to ask any questions regarding the vaccine. Online: Register for the first dose of the vaccine at this link if you are eligible under the Phase 1b requirements. Do not fill out this form if you have already received the first dose. The  Fairfax County Health Department will contact you by email within 4-7 days to schedule your second appointment. Prince William County Prince William is also progressing through Phase 1b of COVID-19 vaccine distribution.  Am I Eligible? Prince William County has adopted the Phase 1b guidelines established by the Virginia Department of Health. Those currently eligible include: Frontline Essential Workers People Aged 65 years and Older People aged 16 through 64 years with a high risk medical condition or disability that increases their risk of severe illness from COVID-19 People Living in Correctional Facilities, Homeless Shelters and Migrant Labor Camps How do I get the vaccine? By phone: Prince William County is directing individuals to register by phone through the statewide system, found at (877) 829-4682 (7 days a week, 8am-8pm, available in English or Spanish) Online: Prince William County is directing individuals to register online through the statewide system found at https://vaccinate.virginia.gov/  Governor Northam’s COVID-19 Restrictions Update On February 24th, Governor Northam announced that due to the falling number of COVID-19 cases in Virginia, restrictions will loosen up some.  Effective March 1st: Alcohol sales will end at midnight (change from 10pm currently) The midnight-to-5 a.m. curfew will be lifted The limit on outdoor social gatherings will increase to 25 people (change from 10 people) Outdoor entertainment and venues will be able to operate at a capacity of 30% or 1,000 people (change from 250 people) Northam also announced that Virginia is in the process of establishing mass vaccination sites in preparation for when Virginia receives more vaccine doses. UPDATED EO-72 ***UPDATE Wednesday, 2/17/21 at 3:00 PM*** Fairfax County has a vaccine and registration data dashboard that is essentially a one stop shop for data on vaccine distribution. The dashboard includes the registration date that they are making appointments for, the number of people registered by day, the percentage of people remaining on the waitlist, the number of people on the waitlist, the total registered, the total doses received by VDH, and the total number of people vaccinated.  Click Here for the COVID-19 Vaccine and Registration Data Dashboard  As mentioned in my last post, Fairfax County will not be participating in the statewide pre-registration system at this time. If you are eligible for the vaccine, Fairfax County residents are highly encouraged to fill out the county’s form rather than the statewide form.  Click Here for the COVID-19 Vaccine Appointment Questionnaire To verify if you are registered to receive a first-dose COVID-19 vaccination appointment, enter your information in the registration status checker. Fairfax County is currently scheduling appointments for individuals who registered on 01/18/21. The dashboard is regularly updated to specify which registration date that they are currently making appointments for. Please be aware that it may take several weeks to contact everyone who signed up on a day where registration volume was high.  Click Here for Fairfax County’s Vaccine Registration Status Checker ***UPDATE Monday, 2/15/21 at 6:00 PM*** A new Statewide Vaccine Pre-Registration System will open the week of February 15, 2021 As the Virginia Department of Health transitions to this new centralized COVID-19 vaccination pre-registration system, the Prince William Health District (PWHD) Waitlist Form was removed permanently at 5 p.m. on Friday, February 12, 2021. Fairfax County will not be taking part in the pre-registration system at this time. Click Here for Press Release from Virginia Department of Health ‘VDH Prepares for Launch of Statewide Pre-Registration System’ Prince William County  As part of the transition to the new statewide system, the PWHD Waitlist Form will automatically upload into the new statewide system. If you previously registered for the vaccine using the PWHD Waitlist Form, you will maintain your status in the waitlist queue when your registration is uploaded into the statewide system. On Tuesday, February 16, 2021, you can access the new statewide system to confirm that you are registered in the statewide system. During the transition between systems, vaccination pre-registration will be temporarily unavailable throughout the state of Virginia from 5 p.m. on Friday, February 12, 2021, until 8 a.m. on Tuesday, February 16, 2021. You cannot pre-register for a vaccine during this period or check your status in the statewide system. Do I need to register AGAIN? There is no need to pre-register again. Your ID number is valid on the new statewide site. If you signed up on the PWHD waitlist, your registration will be uploaded into the statewide system. The new pre-registration site will give you better access to information about your registration, but your personal information is not visible to the public. What about my appointment? The state's pre-registration form does not schedule appointments. If you already have an appointment, it is still scheduled. The PWHD will continue to make and schedule appointments for PWHD residents. What position am I now on the new state site? Your position on the PWHD Waitlist will not change when the statewide system is activated. The date and time you filled out the form and your vaccination eligibility category will remain the same as it was on the PWHD Waitlist. PWHD will upload your registration information to the new state site but will securely save a copy of your registration for official use only if the state site does not work as planned to save your position on the waitlist and contact information. The PWHD Call Center: The PWHD Call Center will continue to operate by answering COVID-19 test result questions and assisting with COVID-19 vaccine scheduling, however all appointments will be booked from the new Virginia pre-registration system. Call Center hours are 7 days a week from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. You may reach the PWHD Call Center by calling 703-872-7759. New COVID vaccination site to open: On Tuesday, February 16, 2021. The new PWHD COVID-19 vaccination site at Manassas Mall will open at the Manassas Mall at 8300 Sudley Road Manassas, VA, 20109 next to the Autobahn store. This location provides a larger space for an increased ability for vaccine distribution. Due to this change, George Mason University's Beacon Hall will close on Monday, February 15, 2021, at 5 p.m. The Kelley Leadership Clinic will also close since it does not allow for further expansion as vaccine allocations increase. By opening the Manassas Mall location closing the GMU Beacon Hall Clinic and the Kelley Leadership Clinic, vaccination stations will increase by 20 to 30 stations. The PWHD and the Unified Coordination Group (UCG), which includes representatives from Prince William County, The City of Manassas, and The City of Manassas Park, will continue to plan for an increase in vaccine allocations for the months ahead. We know that changes in vaccine clinics create confusion and anxiety for some. We will continuously keep information for the community current and up to date. These changes will allow us to vaccinate more rapidly those on the waitlist. Continue to stay safe and well. Whether you have already received the vaccine, or you are eagerly anticipating your turn, we urge you to wear your mask, wash your hands, stay 6 feet apart, and avoid large gatherings and crowds. Fairfax County  When residents of Fairfax County, the cities of Fairfax and Falls Church, and the towns of Vienna, Herndon and Clifton are eligible to register for a vaccine, please continue using the registration system already in place. All vaccine appointments in the Fairfax Health District will continue to be managed by our local registration system. For those already on the waitlist, do not register again on the new statewide system. Also, Virginia is launching a new vaccine call center. The Fairfax County Health Department vaccine call center will continue to be operational, and Fairfax residents should call 703-324-7404 with registration questions. Read Full Press Release from Fairfax County Emergency Information ‘Fairfax Health District Not Participating in Statewide COVID-19 Vaccine Registration System At This Time’***UPDATE Tuesday, 2/9/21 at 10:30 AM*** Today, there were 1700 new cases of COVID-19 in Virginia, bringing the total case number to 530,825. Fairfax County currently has 61,743 cases, Prince William County has 36,668 cases, and Stafford has 8,554 cases. The good news is that the number of vaccines distributed in all three counties has greatly eclipsed the number of current COVID cases, and that number will continue to increase over the next few months as the rate of vaccination increases. As of right now, the first dose of the vaccine has been administered to 253,325 individuals in Fairfax County, 58,300 in Prince William County, and almost 50,000 people in the Rappahannock health district (which includes Stafford County). Click Here for Virginia Department of Health Dashboard on COVID-19 Vaccines Received Fairfax County The isolation of quarantine has negatively affected the mental health of many individuals, especially those with a history of depression and other mental illnesses. The Fairfax County Emergency Information website has shared resources about suicide prevention during COVID-19.  Click Here for Fairfax County’s Press Release ‘Suicide Prevention during COVID-19: Warning Signs of Suicide’ Prince William County  Free COVID-19 testing is available for anyone who lives or works in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park. Participants must provide their full name, telephone number, and a home or work address in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park to obtain COVID testing and receive the results. Here is a list of the upcoming testing sites and locations. All sites can accommodate drive-thru or walk-up testing. To ensure you receive a test, please arrive at the site as close as possible to the start time. Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at each site. During periods of inclement weather or forecasted rain/snow, please check this site for closure information. Wednesday, February 10, 2021 Grace Church Start Time: 9:00 AM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:00 PM, whichever comes first. 1006 Williamstown Dr. Dumfries, VA 22026 Thursday, February 11, 2021 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time: 10:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 2:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Friday, February 12, 2021 Splashdown Water Park Start Time: 2:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 7500 Ben Lomond Park Rd. Manassas, VA 20109 Saturday, February 13, 2021 Development Services Building Start Time: 9:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 12:00 Noon, whichever comes first. 5 County Complex Woodbridge, VA 22192 ***UPDATE Thursday, 2/4/21 at 12:00 PM*** Fairfax County On February 2, Fairfax County Health Department Director Dr. Gloria Addo-Ayensu and her Health Department team provided an update on COVID-19 vaccinations at the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors Health and Human Services Committee meeting.  Among the highlights of the update:  The nation is facing limited vaccine supplies, which means limited supply for Fairfax Health District residents through at least March.  Vaccination will be targeted while supply is limited following guidelines from the Virginia Department of Health.  As of right now, all of Virginia is receiving about 105,000 doses a week, of which 13,600 doses are sent to the Fairfax Health District.  Of those 13,600 doses, the health department is generally following state guidelines at this time and allocating about 50 percent for older adults and 50 percent for front line essential workers.  When supply is sufficient, vaccine will be administered by private providers, pharmacies, occupational health clinics, etc. (similar to flu vaccinations).   Vaccination numbers as of February 1:  Fairfax County Health Department: 45,238 doses  Inova: approximately 75,000 doses  Skilled nursing and assisted living facilities: 6,069 doses   Others: 16,368 doses   As of Feb. 1, more than 186,000 residents have pre-registered for the vaccine in the Fairfax Health District.  Click Here to Read the Full Press Release  from Fairfax County ‘Fairfax Health District COVID-19 Vaccine Update: February 2, 2021’ Prince William County People 65 and older, along with individuals ages 18 to 64, with underlying medical conditions, are included in phase 1b and are eligible to receive the Moderna vaccine, according to Emergency Preparedness and Response Coordinator for the Prince William Health District, Amanda David. Health care workers are included in phase 1a. Individuals in both phases will receive the vaccine at Beacon Hall, located at 10945 George Mason Circle in Manassas, Monday through Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., through Feb. 15. “One thing that I would like people to know is that demand is much higher than supply right now and that we are trying to schedule people based on our priority lists,” David said. Vaccine supplies are limited, and those eligible to receive the vaccine may have to wait to receive it. Currently, supplies of the vaccine are limited across the country. “We are asking people to be patient. We are getting emails left and right, and it is hard to correspond and try to reach everyone that does reach out to us. We’re doing the best we can with the information given to us day by day,” she added. “We do still have folks in phase 1a that need to be vaccinated, but we are collecting information on a waitlist through an online form. Once we have more vaccine availability, we will reach out to them to schedule appointments,” said David. The health district is unable to accommodate walk-up participants since all vaccines are distributed on an appointment basis.  The health district serves Prince William County and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park and can be reached via its Call Center at 703-872-7759, seven days a week, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Text COVIDPWC to 888777 for COVID-19 alerts. Click Here to Register for the Waitlist Click Here to Read Press Release from Prince William County Government ‘Vaccinations Take Place at Prince William Health District’s New COVID-19 Vaccine Center as Residents Added to Waitlist’ ***UPDATE Monday, 2/1/21 at 5:15 PM*** According to the Virginia Department of Health (VDH), there has been a total of 507,540 COVID-19 cases, with 2,861 new cases today. Fairfax County: 59,717 cases, 3268 hospitalized, 784 deaths Prince William County: 35,412 cases, 1,318 hospitalized, 313 deaths Stafford County: 1,320 cases* (VDH has not updated this count in the last two days) Fairfax County: All COVID-19 vaccine appointments that were scheduled for after 12:30 pm on Sunday, January 31st or at any time on Monday, February 1st will be rescheduled for later in the week due to inclement weather conditions. Individuals who had their appointments cancelled should have received instructions and a link for rescheduling via email.  Prince William County: Prince William County has cancelled the COVID testing scheduled for tomorrow morning, February 2nd at James S. Long Regional Park. All COVID-19 vaccination appointments scheduled for today (February 1st) at GMU’s Beacon Hall and Potomac Middle School have been cancelled due to hazardous weather conditions. Individuals with an appointment that has been cancelled should receive an email with information about rescheduling, or they can call the Prince William County Health Department call service for assistance with rescheduling.  Stafford County: In the Rappahannock area health district (which includes Stafford county), all COVID-19 vaccination appointments for today (February 1st) have been rescheduled to Monday, February 8th due to inclement weather.  ***UPDATE Thursday, 1/28/21 at 4:30 PM*** Fairfax County Over the past several days, the Fairfax County Health Department has been working with Inova to develop plans for vaccinating private/public school and childcare providers. Starting this Thursday, Inova will resume vaccinating individuals in this priority group. The County will continue to work with Inova to schedule additional appointments in the coming weeks as vaccine supplies allow. FCPS will be notifying eligible staff with instructions on how to register, and the Fairfax County Office for Children will identify and notify center-based and home childcare providers who are eligible. The Fairfax County Health Department continues to operate vaccination clinics for our high risk priority groups in 1a and 1b at our County district offices and at the Fairfax County Government Center. Vaccine Limited Until at Least March The Fairfax County Health Department has currently vaccinated approximately 35,200 individuals since receiving its first shipment of vaccine in late December 2020. Due to allocations that go into effect this week, the pace of incoming doses is not expected to increase until March. This means we will have limited vaccine supply for at least several more weeks. We are working expeditiously to schedule vaccination appointments each week in the order that the registrations have been received based on the amount of vaccine we have available. Click Here to Read ‘What You Need to Know About Limited Vaccine Supply’ from Fairfax County Government Prince William County Free COVID-19 testing is available for anyone who lives or works in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park. Participants must provide their full name, telephone number, and a home or work address in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park to obtain COVID testing and receive the results. Here is a list of the upcoming testing sites and locations. All sites can accommodate drive-thru or walk-up testing. To ensure you receive a test, please arrive at the site as close as possible to the start time. Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at each site. During periods of inclement weather or forecasted rain/snow, please check this site for closure information.Friday, January 29, 2021 Splashdown Water Park Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 7500 Ben Lomond Park Rd. Manassas, VA 20109 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time: 4:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Saturday, January 30, 2021 Development Services Building Start Time: 9:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 12:00 Noon, whichever comes first. 5 County Complex, Woodbridge, VA 22192 Monday, February 1, 2021 Metz Middle School Start Time: 10:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 2:00 PM, whichever comes first. 9950 Wellington Rd. Manassas, VA 20110 Tuesday, February 2, 2021 James S. Long Regional Park Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first.  4603 James Madison Hwy. Haymarket, VA 20169 Cloverdale Park Start Time: 4:00 PM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 15150 Cloverdale Rd. Dale City, VA 22193 Wednesday, February 3, 2021 Grace Church Start Time: 9:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:00 PM, whichever comes first. 1006 Williamstown Dr. Dumfries, VA 22026 Thursday, February 4, 2021 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time: 10:00 AM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 2:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Friday, February 5, 2021 Splashdown Water Park Start Time: 2:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 7500 Ben Lomond Park Rd.  Manassas, VA 20109 Saturday, February 6, 2021 Development Services Building Start Time: 9:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 12:00 PM, whichever comes first. 5 County Complex Woodbridge, VA 22192 Click Here to Find Testing Locations (Updated Regularly) ***UPDATE Monday, 1/25/21 at 10:00 PM*** Fairfax County Inova announced Monday it had canceled scheduled vaccinations for teachers and staff members in Fairfax County Public Schools “for the foreseeable future.” The decision affects at least 15,000 school district employees — roughly 60 percent of its workforce — all of whom registered for doses under the 1B phase of Virginia’s vaccine rollout. Inova, which has been administering the Fairfax school district vaccinations, said in an email to school staff members that a national vaccine shortage prompted the Virginia Department of Health to direct vaccine doses away from hospitals, leaving its supply “severely diminished.”  Click Here for the Full Article by the Washington Post ‘Coronavirus vaccination appointments canceled in D.C. region as health officials confront scarce supply’ Here is the full email that was sent to FCPS employees on Monday evening:  Due to vaccine supply limitations, first dose appointments for FCPS employees, and others in 1b, are cancelled as of January 26, 2021 for the foreseeable future. Inova will reach out to everyone who has registered when more information is available to reschedule a vaccine. Those who have already received a first dose from Inova and are scheduled for a second dose appointment, will be prioritized at this time and their appointments will be honored. Vaccinating everyone in the Northern Virginia community, as quickly as possible, is Inova’s top priority right now. Last week, in response to a national shortage of the COVID-19 vaccine, the Virginia Department of Health made a modification to its vaccine distribution methods and announced that going forward, vaccines will be sent directly to health districts to be allocated appropriately. As a result, Inova’s allocation of vaccine has been severely diminished, causing us to make the difficult decision to prioritize the available doses. Rest assured, Inova is working to re-schedule first dose appointments as soon as possible.   We understand and share the frustration that this news brings to our patients. When we receive more supply inventory, we will first prioritize patients who had an appointment scheduled and then focus on opening further appointments up to eligible groups. If you are a patient whose appointment is cancelled, rest assured we are working diligently to identify new supply and will reach out to reschedule your appointment as soon as we are confident we have a vaccine for you.   In the last month, Inova quickly established operations and delivered shots to as many eligible patients as possible. We have administered more than 70,000 vaccines and look forward to resuming this pace as soon as vaccine supply improves.    Click Here for Updates about Vaccine Distribution from Inova My office will monitor this situation and provide timely updates on my blog and social media pages.  ***UPDATE Friday, 1/22/21 at 1:30 PM*** Prince William County As of Sunday, Jan. 17, the health district had already filled its available vaccination appointments through Feb. 15 and began collecting eligible residents’ names and contact information for a waiting list, which launched Sunday. “The demand continues to exceed supply, and that’s going to continue for some time,” Brian Misner, the county’s emergency operations coordinator, told the Prince William Board of County Supervisors on Tuesday. By Tuesday afternoon, the list was already 25,000 names long, Misner said. “We don’t fully know why the allocation was reduced at the commonwealth level, whether it was a reduction at the federal government, whether something else occurred,” he added. “It is a very difficult situation to help manage expectations, and there is a very large number of people who are currently in this pool of eligibility.”The Prince William County Health Department is working in conjunction with the Prince William County Government to expand the COVID-19 Call Center to provide information to residents about vaccines and assist with those who do not have access to a computer, the internet, or email. They are open Monday–Sunday, 9:00 am–4:30 P.M. at 703-872-7759. Click Here for Full Article by InsideNOVA ‘Over 25,000 Prince William residents on vaccine wait list’ Click here for Full Article by Prince William Times ‘County official: At current rate, COVID-19 vaccinations for priority groups will take month’  Free COVID-19 testing is available for anyone who lives or works in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park. Participants must provide their full name, telephone number, and a home or work address in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park to obtain COVID testing and receive the results. Here is a list of the upcoming testing sites and locations. All sites can accommodate drive-thru or walk-up testing. To ensure you receive a test, please arrive at the site as close as possible to the start time. Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at each site. During periods of inclement weather or forecasted rain/snow, please check this site for closure information. Saturday, January 23, 2021 Enterprise Elementary School Start Time: 9:00 AM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 12:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13900 Lindendale Rd. Woodbridge, VA 22193 Monday, January 25, 2021 Metz Middle School Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 9950 Wellington Rd. Manassas, VA 20110 Splashdown Water Park Start Time: 4:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 7500 Ben Lomond Park Rd. Manassas, VA 20109 Tuesday, January 26, 2021 James S. Long Regional Park Start Time: 11:00 AM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 4603 James Madison Hwy Haymarket, VA 20169 Cloverdale Park Start Time: 4:00 PM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 15150 Cloverdale Rd. Dale City, VA 22193 Wednesday, January 27, 2021 Grace Church Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 1006 Williamstown Dr. Dumfries, VA 22026 Metz Middle School Start Time: 4:00 PM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 9950 Wellington Rd. Manassas, VA 20110 Thursday, January 28, 2021 Cloverdale Park Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 15150 Cloverdale Rd. Dale City, VA 22193 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time: 4:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Friday, January 29, 2021 Splashdown Water Park Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 7500 Ben Lomond Park Rd. Manassas, VA 20109 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time: 4:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Saturday, January 30, 2021 Development Services Building Start Time: 9:00 AM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 12:00 Noon, whichever comes first. 5 County Complex, Woodbridge, VA 22192 Click Here to Find Testing Locations (Updated Regularly) Fairfax County Between Monday and Wednesday roughly 65,000 people registered online. But Tuesday, the county only received 22,175 doses (16,575 for first doses and 5,600 allocated for people getting their second doses). County leaders stressed the number of vaccines they get, and when they get them, is beyond their control. As of January 20, approximately 115,000 people have registered to get a vaccine appointment. Fairfax County's Department of health stressed patience as it could take months to vaccinate all of the eligible people in the 1a and 1b groups based on limited vaccine supply. Appointments are released every week on a first-come, first-served basis depending on how many doses the county receives. Click Here for the Full Article by ABC13 News ‘Vaccines in Virginia: 'Overwhelmed by demand, underwhelmed by supply' ***UPDATE Wednesday, 1/20/21 at 2:00 PM*** Prince William County halts COVID-19 vaccine appointments due to limited supply The Prince William Health District has filled all available COVID-19 vaccine appointments through February 15 and is not scheduling any more appointments because it will not receive enough vaccine doses from the federal government. I have repeatedly expressed my disappointment in the vaccination roll-out. Federal leadership has completely mismanaged this process and I am optimistic we will see improvements after President Biden takes office on Wednesday. I will also be urging members of Congress to support the President's COVID Relief bill which includes $350 billion to state, local and territorial governments to distribute the vaccine, increase testing, and maintain vital services. Prince William County and many other jurisdictions need this support. A spokeswoman for the health district said last week that in just the first two days over 5,500 Prince William residents began the process of registering online for the vaccinations when the registration form opened Monday for residents aged 75 and older.  Later in the week, per guidance from Gov. Ralph Northam, the eligibility was expanded to include anyone age 65 and older as well as residents under the age of 65 with comorbid conditions.  Click Here for Full Article by InsideNOVA ‘Prince William halts COVID-19 vaccine appointments due to limited supply’ At 540 appointments a day, the health district will be able to administer about 10,800 doses between Jan. 19 and Feb. 15.  The vaccines require two doses - administered three or four weeks apart - to be fully effective, so it would need another 10,800 doses just to fully vaccinate those recipients.  Due to the limited availability of vaccines and the fact that appointments are now booked through Feb. 15, the three jurisdictions (Prince William County, Manassas City and Manassas Park) assisted the health district by establishing a new unified waitlist application. Click Here for the Vaccine Appointment Waitlist Form The waitlist form poses a series of questions that determine your eligibility.  If you meet the criteria, you will be added to the waitlist and contacted in the order in which you signed up once appointments become available.  Residents who do not meet the waitlist criteria should monitor local media or the health district website for updates on when additional categories of residents become eligible.  It is important to note that completing this form will add you to a wait list for when additional vaccine appointments become available. It does not automatically schedule you for an appointment. Due to limited vaccine availability from the federal government, it will likely be days to weeks before you are contacted to schedule an available appointment. If the health district receives additional vaccines, then this timeframe will change.  It is also important to note that this form (survey process) must be completed one time for each person; responses cannot be shared. For example, a husband and wife living in the same household and sharing the same phone number and email address must each submit this form separately with their name and date of birth. But unlike the previous form one email will work for more than one individual.  For those who do not have access to a computer, the internet, or email, they may contact the Prince William Health District Call Center at 703-872-7759 to be added to this wait list by phone. The call center does not have the capability to take requests or make appointments, as call center agents are only able to enter information into this form. The call center hours are now 9:00am-4:30pm M-Sun.  In order to accommodate and provide more vaccinations to the public, the Prince William Health District's vaccination clinic is being moved from Metz Middle School to Beacon Hall on the Prince William Campus of George Mason University (GMU).  The new clinic will open on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021.  Click Here to Read the Full Press Release from Prince William County Government Free COVID-19 testing is available for anyone who lives or works in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park. Participants must provide their full name, telephone number, and a home or work address in Prince William County, the City of Manassas, or the City of Manassas Park to obtain COVID testing and receive the results. Here is a list of the upcoming testing sites and locations. All sites can accommodate drive-thru or walk-up testing. To ensure you receive a test, please arrive at the site as close as possible to the start time. Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at each site. Thursday, January 21, 2021 Cloverdale Park Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 15150 Cloverdale Rd. Dale City, VA 22193 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time: 4:00 PM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Friday, January 22, 2021 Splashdown Water Park Start Time: 11:00 AM Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 1:30 PM, whichever comes first. 7500 Ben Lomond Park Rd. Manassas, VA 20109 Woodbridge Senior Center Start Time 4:00 PM  Testing is only available until the allocated test kits are depleted at the site or until 6:00 PM, whichever comes first. 13850 Church Hill Dr. Woodbridge, VA 22191 Click Here to Find Testing Locations (Updated Regularly) ***UPDATE Sunday, 1/17/21 at 11:00 A.M.*** Fairfax County On Jan. 14, Governor Ralph Northam announced that people age 65 and older and people age 16-64 with a high-risk medical condition or disability that increases their risk of severe illness from COVID-19 will be moved into Phase 1b. This group, in addition to the 75+ year population, accounts for approximately 40% of all our residents over the age of 16.   At this time the Fairfax County Health Department is unable to schedule appointments for everyone in these new groups while they continue to work through the large number of individuals who have registered over the last four days and are still awaiting appointment dates.  Please note that due to limited supplies of vaccine, it may take months to get through Phase 1b.  The ability to schedule appointments will depend on the supply of vaccine available.  The vaccine supply in the U.S. is still very limited and is expected to increase gradually over the next few months. The Health Department will begin registering individuals in these new groups on Jan. 18.  Click Here to Read the Full Article ‘Vaccination Registration Begins Jan. 18 for 65+ and People with Medical Conditions’ Fairfax County public and private school teachers and staff started receiving their COVID-19 vaccinations, Saturday, Jan. 16. The Health Department has partnered with Inova, which will administer the vaccine to this group.   Here is the vaccination scheduling information for this third group:  Public school teachers and staff have received scheduling information directly from Fairfax County Public Schools and Falls Church City Public Schools.   Private school teachers and staff will receive scheduling information from the Health Department.  Childcare staff will receive scheduling information from the Health Department. Click Here for Public and Private School Teachers and Staff to Register for a Vaccine Appointment For example, Fairfax County teachers and staff would click ‘Fairfax County Public School Employee’ then ‘Schedule an appointment.’ There will be a list of available days/times. The Fairfax County Health Department asks for your patience as it may take months to get through these priority groups.  Click Here to Read the Full Article about ‘What You Need to Know if You Have Registered to Get a Vaccine Appointment’ Click Here for Status Updates about COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution for Priority Groups  Waiting for First Dose Appointments If you have registered to get vaccinated and already have an appointment scheduled to receive your first dose, please keep your appointment. We have adequate vaccine supply for appointments that have already been scheduled. If you have already registered to get vaccinated but have not received an appointment, please note the following: First of all, do not worry. Vaccinating you is our priority and we will do so based on scheduling and supply availability. We will email you to schedule an appointment when we have vaccines available to do so. We are releasing these appointments as supply becomes available. You will remain registered for your vaccination and do not need to re-submit your information. Even though more groups are becoming eligible for vaccination, all appointments are being scheduled in the order that they are received. This means that adults age 75 and older who have already registered will have priority over those who register in the future. The Health Department will send you periodic updates while you are on the waitlist about your status. Second Dose Process While vaccine supply continues to remain very limited, we expect to receive enough doses each week to provide second doses to people who have already received their first dose. Individuals who received their first dose from the Health Department so far have received the Moderna vaccine. It is recommended that the same vaccine is given at least 28 days after the first dose. There is no maximum interval between the first and second doses. Soon, the Health Department will begin offering Pfizer vaccine, which requires that the second dose be given at least 21 days after the first dose.  Other vaccine products may be used in the future, so it is important that you refer to your “CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card” when making a second dose appointment to match the manufacturer of your first dose. The Health Department will send you an invitation to schedule your second dose during the most appropriate window based on your first dose date. You do not need to contact the Health Department to schedule your second dose and you do not need to complete the registration form again. Individuals who received vaccines from Inova or Reston hospitals should reach out to their vaccinator for information on second dose scheduling. ***UPDATE Tuesday, 1/12/21 4:00 P.M.*** Fairfax and Prince William Counties to begin COVID-19 Vaccination Phase 1b on Monday, January 11 Beginning tomorrow, Fairfax and Prince William counties will be part of 11 health districts that the Virginia Department of Health will allow to add vaccination opportunities for the following groups in phase 1b including: frontline essential workers (i.e. police, fire, and hazmat workers), people age 75 and older, and people living in correctional facilities, homeless shelters or migrant labor camps.  Meanwhile, these health districts will continue with phase 1a to ensure that people are vaccinated as quickly and efficiently as possible. This announcement comes several days after Governor Ralph Northam’s call to increase flexibility and speed up vaccination distribution in the Commonwealth. Click Here to Find Out Which Vaccine Phase You Are In And/Or How to Get Registered in Your County Click Here for More Information about the Press Release from the Virginia  Department of HealthFairfax County The following chart guides each priority group on how to register for a vaccine. It also shows where they will be vaccinated. It is important to note that registering for a vaccine is different for each of the priority groups so please read the chart carefully. If you are not yet eligible, regular updates about vaccine rollment are published here.   Click Here for an FAQ about Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine in Fairfax County Adults 75+ By phone: Call the Health Department’s vaccine hotline at 703-324-7404 (Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to register for an appointment. Online Registration Step 1: Complete a Pre-Screen and Vaccine Appointment Questionnaire Click Here to Start Pre-Screen Step 2: Appointment Scheduling  Within a few days, the Health Department will call or email you to schedule an appointment. Video from Fairfax County about Vaccine Phases: Prince William County The Prince William Health District’s normal business hours are from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m Monday – Friday.  The Prince William Health District can be reached 24/7 by phone at 703-792-7300. *I will update this blog post with more information how priority groups within phase 1b can schedule their vaccine as it becomes available. ***UPDATE FRIDAY, 1/8/21 12:00 P.M.*** Virginia Cases (as of 5 pm on 1/5/21) Total cases = 37,730, new cases in the past 24-hour period= 5,387Total deaths = 5,226, new deaths in the past 24-hour period = 35 Virginia Department of Health Dashboard This dashboard will keep people informed about the number of vaccine doses distributed in Virginia and the number of doses administered. It is updated daily. The number of doses of vaccine administered shown on the vaccine dashboard will always lag slightly behind the actual number of doses administered. On January 6, Governor Northam announced new steps to accelerate the COVID-19 vaccination program. He is taking the following steps to help providers increase the rate of vaccinations as quickly, safely, and equitably as possible: Vaccination goal. Governor Northam set an initial goal of vaccinating 25,000 Virginians each day when supply allows. ‘Use it or lose it’ model. Medical facilities will be required to put the vaccine they receive into arms as soon as possible, or risk having future vaccine allotments reduced. Danny T.K. Avula to lead vaccination efforts in Virginia. Governor Northam appointed Dr. Avula, who serves as director of the Richmond City and Henrico County Health Departments to coordinate work between state officials, local health departments, hospitals, and private providers. Expanded priority groups. Governor Northam announced that K-12 teachers and child care workers will be among the next priority groups to receive vaccinations after Group A, and outlined the populations that will be included in Groups B and C. Elevating the Virginia National Guard. As the Commonwealth receives more doses, the Virginia National Guard will provide logistical support and help local health departments will administering vaccines. Group B includes frontline essential workers in specific industries, K-12 teachers and staff, childcare providers, adults age 75 and older, and people living in correctional facilities, homeless shelters, and migrant labor camps.  Group C includes other essential workers, adults age 65 and older, and people age 16-64 with certain medical conditions or disabilities that increase their risk of severe illness from COVID-19.  Click Here for Additional Information about the Governor Northam's Press Conference Click Here for Additional Information about Group B Click Here for Additional Information about Group C ***UPDATE FRIDAY, 12/18/20 4:00 P.M.*** The holiday season is in full swing and with it comes a surge of coronavirus cases due to holiday gatherings and travel. We are seeing longer lines to get tested across the country in an effort to gather safely. Testing laboratories have warned about supply shortages and delays because of increased demand. State and local officials are combating the recent surge of coronavirus cases by implementing new restrictions and expanding access to COVID-19 testing.  The Virginia Department of Health has created a webpage dedicated solely to virus updates where you will find content that is updated daily. The CDC also has a dedicated website:  Virginia Department of Health Center for Disease Control Here are some updates about the new restrictions and where you can get tested for COVID-19:  New Statewide COVID-19 Restrictions Governor Ralph Northam held a press conference on December 10 about new safety measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 across the Commonwealth.  “Executive Order Seventy-Two directs Virginians to stay at home between the hours of 12:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m., implements a universal mask requirement, and lowers the limit on social gatherings from 25 people to 10 people. The order will take effect at 12:01 a.m. on Monday, December 14, and remain in place through January 31, 2021, unless rescinded or amended.” “Virginia restaurants must continue to adhere to strict social distancing and sanitization requirements. The on-site sale, consumption, and possession of alcohol remain prohibited after 10:00 p.m. in any restaurant, dining establishment, food court, brewery, microbrewery, distillery, winery, or tasting room. All restaurants, dining establishments, food courts, breweries, microbreweries, distilleries, wineries, and tasting rooms must close by midnight.” If you have been teleworking, you are encouraged to continue to do so if at all possible. As numbers are on the rise, consider talking to your boss about schedule rotations for in-office work as needed. Business owners should continue to consider additional ways to protect both their employees and customers.  Click here to read Executive Order 72  Here is a link to all of the Governor's Executive Orders:  COVID-19 Executive Orders Virginia Case Count At the moment, there are approximately 3,700 new COVID-19 cases per day in Virginia. This is over three times the statewide peak of 1,200 back in May.  View Daily Case Counts by Locality  How Virginia Plans to distribute the COVID-19 vaccine We have a responsibility to do our part to contain COVID-19. There is light at the end of the tunnel. The FDA has given emergency authorization for two COVID-19 vaccines with the first batch of 70,000 doses of Pfizer’s vaccine arriving across the country within weeks.  December 4:Virginia Medical Disaster Advisory Committee decided how the COVID-19 vaccines would be prioritized. The committee’s resolution said, “The initial shipment of Pfizer vaccine should be distributed in its entirety to Virginia hospitals and health systems for administration to healthcare personnel who directly engage in the care of or interact with patients known or suspected of COVID-19, or who have direct exposure to potentially infectious materials from patients known or suspected to be infected with COVID-19.” December 12:Governor Northam said, “The first allotment of the vaccine will arrive in Virginia in the next 24 to 48 hours, and will be immediately dispersed to health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities. It will take several months to get all 8.5 million Virginians vaccinated. These measures are critical to limiting the number of positive cases, hospitalizations, and deaths.”  December 14: The vaccine arrived in Virginia. A press release from the Governor’s office said, “Virginia health systems expect to receive an estimated 480,000 doses of vaccine from two manufacturers, Pfizer and Moderna, by the end of December.” Phased Approach to COVID-19 Vaccination: Phase 1: Health care workers, residents of long-term care facilities, and high-risk individuals Started on December 14, 2020 Phase 2: Frontline workers - ex: teachers, food preparers, police, firefighters, etc.  Phase 3: General population  Expected to begin early to midsummer 2021 Some groups may not be eligible until further safety tests are done, such as children and pregnant adults. Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination (CDC) Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions (FDA) More information about testing and Prince William County's response to COVID-19 We will update this thread to include more testing locations as they become available. As always, please reach out to my office at 571-249-4484 or district36@senate.virginia.gov if you have questions or ideas about things we can do to serve the community better. 

Weekly Column: Virginia's Rockets Up In Vaccine Distribution & Death Penalty Repeal Moves Forward

February 10, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of February 8, 2021.                The Fifth Week of the General Assembly Session brought Crossover and the conclusion of some of our most contentious bills.                First, Virginia rocketed up to the top ten in vaccine distribution in America.  While the system is still adjusting to vaccine supply, many constituents have reported to me that they have been able to get vaccinated.  The coming single shot Johnson and Johnson vaccine and Astra Zeneca will allow Virginia to ramp up from the current rate of 128,000 shots per week. Although infection rates are dropping, the English and South African variants have arrived in Virginia and we must remain vigilant – even after people are vaccinated.  No state is doing better that Virginia that has a larger population and we have the 8th lowest per capital death rate.  Group 1a should be done by the end of this week.   Ten of my twelve bills “crossed over” to the House of Delegates.  My legislation to abolish capital punishment in Virginia passed the Senate after a two-hour floor debate.  Virginia has executed 1,389 people since 1608 and the second largest number of people since capital punishment was reauthorized by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976.  Studies estimate that one-in-ten given the death penalty are innocent and over 174 have been exonerated including Earl Washington, Jr. here in Virginia.  The inequities of those sentenced to death are indisputable and Virginia spends over $50 million per decade to preserve a sentencing option that no Virginia jury has imposed since 2012.  The House also passed an identical bill and Governor Northam has indicated that he will sign it.                We passed Senator Adam Ebbin’s legislation to remove Virginia ban on same sex marriage from the Constitution of Virginia and a separate bill to remove Virginia’s Jim Crow Era language prohibiting felons from voting until their voting rights are restored by the Governor.  The language is set to be replaced with a right to vote once released from prison.                My legislation to comprehensively reform Virginia’s punitive restrictions of criminal record expungement passed the Senate as well.  Longstanding criminal histories create barriers to housing and employment for hundreds of thousands of Virginians and limit available workforce.  Forty-one other states allow the sealing of misdemeanor convictions and thirty-six allow the same for felonies.  My legislation will create a petition-based process for expunging crimes with some automatic sealing for minor crimes.  The House of Delegates has passed similar legislation which will need to be reconciled.                 I also carried legislation requested by the Fairfax County School Board that would allow a locality to ask about a bidder’s arbitration practices during procurement.  Many businesses use mandatory pre-dispute arbitration contract clauses that prohibit employees with sexual harassment, civil rights or wage theft claims from using the courts to resolve their disputes which keeps these problems from being seen by the media or the public.                My legislation to allow class action lawsuits in Virginia also passed the Senate.  Virginia is one of only two states that prohibit consumers from aggregating their claims and allow individuals to aggregate their bargaining leverage to obtain relief from businesses.                My legislation to provide Fairfax County greater flexibility in raising funds to pay for underground utilities on U.S. 1 passed the Senate 33-6.  I am hopeful that this will give the County the additional resources it needs so it can commit to underground utilities in the $900 million bus rapid transit and road widening from Huntington to Fort Belvoir similar to what Prince William County has committed to complete along its 14-mile stretch of U.S. 1.                I passed two bills to help our immigrant community.  My bill harmonizing state and federal laws on Special Immigrant Juvenile Status passed along with legislation creating a framework for immigrant human trafficking and crime victims to obtain U or T Visas from the Federal Government.                Each chamber’s competing budget proposals will be announced this week and we will start work on legislation from each other’s chamber.  Keep responding to my constituent survey at www.scottsurovell.org/survey and please email me at scott@scottsurovell.orgif you have any questions or problems getting your vaccine.

Weekly Column: Virginia Legislature Is Moving Bills, Addressing Problems

January 31, 2021
The following is my column that will appear in the Mt. Vernon Gazette, Springfield Connection, The Prince William Times, The Fort Hunt Herald, and Potomac Local in the week of January 31, 2021. Virginia Legislature Is Moving Bills, Addressing Problems As the General Assembly begins its fourth week in session this year, vaccine deployment for Covid-19 has started to accelerate and we are discussing how to jump-start in-person schooling.  Virginia’s Secretary of Education believes all school personnel will be vaccinated by March 1 and a bill is pending to require in-person elementary-secondary school options no later than July 1.  Depending on how discussions go, the General Assembly might pass a mandate to require in-person learning sooner. My Bills Are Advancing Due to the pandemic, all Senators were limited to introducing a maximum of 12 bills.  At this point, the Senate has approved three of my bills and the other nine are working their way through the legislature.  The federal government allows immigrant children who have been abused, abandoned or neglected to claim “Special Immigrant Juvenile Status” (SIJS) after state courts have made certain findings through an immigrant’s 21stbirthday.  In 2019, I passed legislation restoring the authority of Virginia’s courts to make such findings, but the courts lose jurisdiction on a child’s 18th birthday.  My bill harmonizes Virginia and federal rules to allow countless young adults between the ages of 18 and 21 to claim SIJS status going forward. Virginia last raised minimum vehicle insurance policy limits in 1975.  Today, Virginia has one of the lowest minimum auto policies in America.  This means hundreds of Virginians receive $25,000 settlements when their medical bills and lost wages can total hundreds of thousands of dollars every year.  My bill raises Virginia’s minimum policy to $50,000 and passed the Senate on a 27-11 vote. This week, the Senate will debate my legislation to abolish capital punishment.  My chief cosponsor is Republican Senator William Stanley and I hope to garner additional bipartisan support on the final vote.  Undergrounding Utilities The Prince William County Board of Supervisors and Town of Dumfries have committed to fund underground utilities on all 14 miles of U.S. 1 between the Occoquan River and Quantico.  The next step is to bury utilities on U.S. 1 between the Kings Crossing and Fort Belvoir in Fairfax County as part of the $800 million U.S. 1 Bus Rapid Transit Project.  Dominion Energy, Verizon and Cox have estimated that it will cost $84 million. The Virginia Department of Transportation has committed $15 million towards the cost and Verizon has agreed to cover the $40 million cost of burying their wires if the County construct a slightly expanded duct bank to include space for Verizon conduit.  The remaining $59 million is unfunded.  In 2019, I passed legislation allowing a $1.00 per month county tax on electric meters to fund undergrounded utilities on U.S. 1 so that undergrounding utilities would not compete with County taxpayer funds for schools or other local priorities.  The concept is supported by the Mount Vernon Council of Citizens Associations and the Mount Vernon-Lee Chamber of Commerce and is cosponsored by Senator Adam Ebbin and Delegates Paul Krizek, Mark Sickles and Kathy Tran.  I am working with Chairman Jeff McKay and Supervisors Dan Storck and Rodney Lusk on clarifications that Fairfax County has requested which the Senate will likely approve this week.   Delegate Paul Krizek has introduced a budget amendment to fund a County request for part of the balance, but the state does not have any existing funding programs for local, non-residential, utility undergrounding projects.  Special programs for one of the wealthiest counties in America is often a difficult sell in Richmond but we are fighting for a contribution.    Finally, it is difficult for Virginians to “expunge” or erase certain convictions from their records.  These records can make finding jobs and enjoying a full life nearly impossible, even after years of not committing any offenses.  The Senate will vote this week on my bill to completely modernize Virginia’s expungement system.  Governor Northam put $25 million in his budget to fund computer infrastructure to facilitate major changes, including the ability to seal convictions after periods of good behavior.  Please complete my constituent survey at http://www.scottsurovell.org/survey.   If you have any difficulty securing a vaccine, have questions about legislation or would like to schedule an appointment with me in my “zoom room,” please contact me at scott@scottsurovell.org.  

This is Why We Need Limits on Qualified Immunity: My Bill to Make Police Officers Civilly Liable for Misconduct

January 13, 2021
                                       Last summer, several acts of police brutality against Black Americans and people of color forced Virginia to confront a long history of oppression and racial injustice. Although we have made substantial progress toward racial equality, implicit and explicit racism still persists in Virginia and across America.   Last session we made significant progress modernizing the training, hiring, firing, discipline, and professional accountability for police departments.  However, some issues were too complex to take up in a special session including enhancing civil court remedies for individuals who are harmed by law enforcement officers who violate constitutional and legal standards. This is often referred to as “qualified immunity,” although that is a very small part of the overall civil legal accountability framework.   Qualified immunity shields government officials from consequences liability when they commit legal violations that are not well established in the law.  Click Here to Read Overview of how the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled on qualified immunity cases In the special session, the House of Delegates passed a bill that purported to change the liability standards for law enforcement.  I supported greater access to justice, but the proposed legislation was rife with unintended consequences.  Basing liability on all constitutional violations provides a remedy for firearms rights or religious freedom advocates to challenge statutes such as our recently enacted firearm violence prevention laws.  The Constitution of Virginia also contains rights that are not in the United States Bill of Rights including the right to hunt and fish or victims’ rights which create uncertain consequences.  The special session was not long enough for us to fully consider the implications of this legislation and what comes next.  In addition, during the special session, the Senate of Virginia passed legislation creating an officer Code of Conduct, prohibited chokeholds and shooting into moving motor vehicles, created a duty to intervene and set standards for use of deadly force.  These standards will eliminate the applicability of any immunity defenses when those statutes apply.    Click Here to Read through all the provisions of the Policing Reform Bill (SB 5030)  Click Here to Read HB 5013 Introduced by Del. Jeffrey Bourne By establishing these standards, we can ensure that there are consequences for police officers who act outside of the line of duty. At the time, I said, “If there is any ambiguity of what the law is, qualified immunity kicks in. By making these changes to the Code of Virginia, by clarifying what is legal and what is not legal, we are taking qualified immunity out of the mix.” This bill established enforcement mechanisms within criminal law in the Code of Virginia.  Full Statement from Senate Democrats after passing Policing  Reform Package This session, I am bringing forward a bill that clearly states that police officers who violate the laws we passed last session and their employer will have civil liability. This will provide justice to victims of police and restore some balance to our justice system.  

Winter Storm Watch for Wednesday, December 15: Here’s What You Need to Know

December 15, 2020
It’s that time of year again. Winter in Northern Virginia is often a surprising blend of chill winter weather and unseasonably warm temperatures. Occasionally, snow gets thrown into the mix. This Wednesday, we might be in for some potentially hazardous winter weather. Frozen mix precipitation is likely, and 2-4 inches of snow could accumulate in parts of the district. In light of this week’s forecast, I want to share some resources that you can use to ensure that you stay safe and informed during inclement weather.Weather Updates Like with most weather forecasts, there’s a decent amount of uncertainty surrounding the conditions we might see on Wednesday. Some parts of the district might only get rain or freezing rain, while others might experience more severe forms of wintery participation. The National Weather Service is a great resource for monitoring weather conditions. Click Here For Weather Forecast School Closures Fairfax County School buildings will be closed tomorrow but school will operate virtually. Click Here For Fairfax School Closures Important Resources Dominion Resources Power Outage Line 1-866-366-4357 Dominion Resources Storm Center Outage and Restoration Updates Northern Virginia Outages Map VDOT Street Problem Number1 (800) FOR-ROADVDOT REAL-TIME ONLINE PLOW MAP Other Resources Dominion NOVEC Washington Gas   Fairfax County Police:   703-691-2131  Prince William County:  703-792-6500Stafford County:  540-658-4400 Winter Storm GuidanceWinter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days. Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.Before, during and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable. Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited. Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary. Always give snow plows the right of way. Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks! Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home. Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. Protect yourself from Frostbite! Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. Keep dry! Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing. Snow Removal Due to COVID-19 restrictions that protect the safety of plow workers, it’s possible that plowing might take longer than usual this year. To track when your neighborhood will be plowed, visit the Virginia Department of Transportation’s (VDOT) plowing website, which activates after 2 inches of snow have accumulated in your county. If you live on a private street, it is the responsibility of the developers or the homeowner’s association to arrange for the street to be cleared. Call 800-FOR-Road (800-367-7623) for information on snow removal or to inform VDOT of any snow removal problems. TTY users can call 711. While there’s no legal obligation to clear the sidewalk in front of your house, we rely on residents to help keep neighborhoods pedestrian-friendly during snowy winters. Now more than ever, we’re encouraging younger residents who are able to assist their elderly neighbors with clearing their residential sidewalks to do so in a safe and socially distanced manner. Preventing unnecessary hospitalizations due to icy conditions is especially important during the current COVID-19 pandemic.Remember to exercise caution when driving, stay home if you’re able to, and make sure you’re informed before leaving your home. The VDOT website provides guidelines for how to commute and travel safely during snowy and icy conditions. Again, if you’re able to shelter in place, that’s always the safest option. If you live in Fairfax County, the Fairfax County Emergency Information site provides up-to-date information on the forecast and how the weather could be affecting road conditions, traffic, and public transportation. If you live in Prince William County, you can access updates on weather and traffic conditions on their emergency event information site. If you live in Prince William County, more weather-related resources and updates can be found on the county website. Resources for Unsheltered and Homeless During COVID-19 Winter causes anxiety for the homeless. Shelters are facing unprecedented challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. They must reduce the number of guests allowed inside to limit virus exposure.  The economic challenges brought on by the coronavirus pandemic have caused increased unemployment.  Here is a list of resources in Fairfax and Prince William County that are providing accommodations to the homeless with safety measures in place. Shelters in Fairfax County:  Since 2005, the Hypothermia Prevention Program has prevented death and serious injuries among Fairfax County's most vulnerable residents by ensuring that no one must sleep outside during the winter months.The Hypothermia Prevention Program shelters opened on Tuesday, December 1, 2020, and will remain available 24-hours a day, 7-days a week through the morning of April 1, 2021. Individual sites will have capacity limitations due to social distancing, but staff will work to ensure that everyone has access to accommodations at one of the county’s shelter locations: Eleanor Kennedy Shelter9155 Richmond Highway, Ft. Belvoir Gerry Hyland Government Center, Suite 3098350 Richmond Highway, AlexandriaShelter locations are managed by New Hope Housing. For program-related information, please contact Jason Munoz at jmunoz@newhopehousing.org or Steven Lonon slonon@newhopehousing.org, or call 703-799-0200. Shelters in Prince William County:  The Overnight Shelter for adults is now located at the A. J. Ferlazzo Building Gymnasium (15941 Donald Curtis Dr., Woodbridge) in order to maintain social distancing. It is open from 6:30 p.m. to 7 a.m. for 48 participants. Meals are provided, and showers are available. Transportation is provided every day at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. from the permanent location of the Overnight Shelter to the Ferlazzo Gym; and at 6:45 a.m. from the Ferlazzo Gym to the Bill Mehr Drop-In Center. The Bill Mehr Drop-In Center is still operating at its permanent location, 14716 Potomac Mills Road, Woodbridge, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Monday through Saturday. To help maintain social distancing, up to 10 participants are allowed into the center at one time. There is a waiting area outside that provides shelter from the outdoor elements that also is set up to maintain social distancing. Meals and self-serve laundry are available. Showers are available for those who were not at the Overnight Shelter.  For other types of service, such as Homeless Prevention & Diversion, Emergency Shelter,  Rapid Re-Housing, and Permanent Supportive Housing, contact the CES at 703-792-3366. -------------------- Stay warm, stay safe, and look out for your neighbors.

Sixth Annual Puller Institute - Applications are Open!

December 9, 2020
          While the COVID-19 pandemic has caused the cancellation of many traditions, I'm pleased to announce that the 2021 Puller Institute will go ahead virtually this year. Each year, the Puller Institute has allowed a small group of future leaders-- exceptional junior and senior high school students-- to explore their passions for creating change in the 36th district by engaging with the state legislative process. My hope is that this program inspires a lifelong interest in civic engagement from the participants. I grew up in this area and I graduated from West Potomac High School. I know that you have unique perspectives on local issues. The future of our democracy depends on young leaders like high school students who have the energy and passion for social change.  In past years, the selected students have been able to sit in on sessions in both the Virginia State House of Delegates and the Senate. This year, the Puller institute program will be conducted virtually over zoom. While it will be a big change from previous years, I’m thrilled that we’ll be able to accommodate a greater number of students than we have in the past.  In addition to viewing sessions, participants will have the opportunity to meet with Virginia policymakers and activists. In past years, students have met with Governor Ralph Northam, Secretary of Education Atif Qarni, reporter Michael Pope, Former Delegate Kris Amundson, and Former Delegate Chris Saxman.   At the end of the program, students will present their own state policy proposals to me. Former participants advocated for a wide variety of topics, including making standardized testing more accessible to students with learning disabilities, establishing mandatory AED training for school officials, and improving pedestrian safety in the district by increasing crosswalks. Some of my best legislative ideas have been inspired by Puller Institute pitches!  The sixth annual Puller Institute program will take place remotely: Tuesday, January 19th 8:00 AM- 6:00 PM.  The deadline for the application for the 2021 session is  Tuesday, December 15th 5:00 PM, EST.  Apply here: scottsurovell.org/puller-institute-application If you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to contact my office at 571.249.4484 or at scottsurovell@gmail.com. My Chief of Staff, Philip Scranage, will be happy to answer any questions. 

These are all of the video clips of Scott Surovell’s remarks on the floor of the Senate since 2010. There are 210 video clips in all.

Bills

  • SB449: Death penalty; abolishes penalty, including those persons currently under a death sentence.
  • SB626: Hazardous Substance Aboveground Storage Tank Fund; created.
  • SB637: Estate tax; reinstatement.
  • SB641: Civil action; sale of personal data.
  • SB1092: Performance guarantees, certain; provisions for periodic partial and final release.
  • SB1165: Death penalty; abolition of current penalty.
  • SB1165: Death penalty; abolition of current penalty.
  • SB1180: Civil actions; actions filed on behalf of multiple similarly situated persons.
  • SB1180: Civil actions; actions filed on behalf of multiple similarly situated persons.
  • SB1181: Special immigrant juvenile status; jurisdiction.
  • SB1181: Special immigrant juvenile status; jurisdiction.
  • SB1182: Motor vehicle liability insurance; increases coverage amounts.
  • SB1182: Motor vehicle liability insurance; increases coverage amounts.
  • SB1289: Health insurance; carrier business practices, provider contracts.
  • SB1289: Health insurance; carrier business practices, provider contracts.
  • SB1339: Police and court records; expungement and sealing of records, Expungement Fee Fund created.
  • SB1339: Police and court records; expungement and sealing of records, Expungement Fee Fund created.
  • SB1384: Virginia Public Procurement Act; local arbitration agreements.
  • SB1384: Virginia Public Procurement Act; local arbitration agreements.
  • SB1385: Underground utility facilities; Fairfax County.
  • SB1385: Underground utility facilities; Fairfax County.
  • SB1440: Law-enforcement officer, etc.; civil action for unlawful acts of force or failure to intervene.
  • SB1446: Medicine and other healing arts; practice, provision of litigation assistance.
  • SB1457: Historic sites; urban county executive form of gov't. (Fairfax County), provisions in its ordinance.
  • SB1457: Historic sites; urban county executive form of gov't. (Fairfax County), provisions in its ordinance.
  • SB1468: Victims of crime; certifications for victims of qualifying criminal activity.
  • SB1468: Victims of crime; certifications for victims of qualifying criminal activity.
  • SJ278: Commending the Honorable Bruce D. White.
  • SJ279: Commending the Honorable Steven Selwyn Smith.
  • SJ280: Commending the Honorable Kimberly J. Daniel.
  • SJ281: Commending the Honorable Janine M. Saxe.
  • SJ283: Celebrating the life of Marisa L. Fleck.
  • SJ340: Commending Edwin C. Roessler, Jr.
  • SR506: Commending the Virginia State Police and the Virginia National Guard.
  • SR509: Commending Walt Whitman Middle School.
  • SR510: Commending Montclair Elementary School.
  • SR511: Commending Swans Creek Elementary School.
  • SR512: Commending Featherstone Elementary School.
  • SR513: Celebrating the life of Charles R. Hooff III.
  • SR522: Celebrating the life of Thomas F. Cleary, M.D.
  • SR523: Celebrating the life of Carlton Farquhar Andrus.
  • SR710: Commending the James Madison University softball team.
  • SR711: Commending Village Hardware.
  • SR712: Commending Ourisman Automotive Group.
  • SR713: Commending the Reverend Keary Kincannon.
  • SR714: Commending Michael Fanone.
  • SR715: Commending the Honorable Janice Justina Wellington.
  • SR716: Commending the South County High School girls' soccer team.
  • SB33: Consumer finance companies; loans, licensing.
  • SB34: Driver privilege cards; definitions, effective date, report.
  • SB35: Firearms, ammunition, etc.; control by localities by governing possession, etc., within locality.
  • SB37: Open-end credit plans; civil penalty.
  • SB38: Open-end credit plans; governing law.
  • SB72: Public defender offices; Cities of Manassas and Manassas Park and County of Prince William.
  • SB106: Hydraulic fracturing; drilling through any portion of a groundwater management area, prohibition.
  • SB108: Virginia State Justice Commission; purpose, membership.
  • SB160: Handheld personal communications devices; holding devices while driving a motor vehicle.
  • SB245: Conversion therapy; prohibited by certain health care providers.
  • SB246: Driver's license, etc.; sex designation on application form.
  • SB247: No-fault divorce; gender-neutral terminology.
  • SB428: Initial child support order; unreimbursed medical expenses for pregnancy and birth.
  • SB429: Child support; withholding from income of an independent contractor.
  • SB430: Minor's child-care records; access by parent.
  • SB431: Provision of mental health services to a minor; access to health records.
  • SB432: Spousal support; reservation of right to seek, material change of circumstances.
  • SB433: Domestic relations cases; invocation of constitutional rights, adverse inference.
  • SB434: Child support; assignment of tax credits.
  • SB435: Waterfowl blinds; blinds in locality where certain hunting prohibited.
  • SB436: Virginia Voluntary Do Not Sell Firearms List; established, penalty.
  • SB437: Bicyclists and other vulnerable road users; penalty.
  • SB438: Judicial performance evaluation program; risk assessment tool, use of alternative sanction.
  • SB439: Driving under the influence; remote alcohol monitoring, penalty.
  • SB440: Electronic transmission of sexually explicit visual material by minors; penalties.
  • SB441: Alcoholic beverage control; winery license privileges.
  • SB449: Death penalty; abolishes penalty, including those persons currently under a death sentence.
  • SB451: Juvenile and domestic relations district court; award of attorney fees and costs.
  • SB489: Criminal cases; authority to defer and dismiss.
  • SB491: Inquiry and report of immigration status; persons charged with or convicted of certain crimes.
  • SB492: Sex offenses; requiring registration.
  • SB625: Failure to advise of consequences of guilty plea; vacation of conviction.
  • SB626: Hazardous Substance Aboveground Storage Tank Fund; created.
  • SB628: Virginia Residential Property Disclosure Act; residential building energy analysis.
  • SB629: Shared solar programs; electric utility regulation, etc.
  • SB630: Common interest communities; electric vehicle charging stations permitted.
  • SB631: Abandoned and stolen shopping carts; local regulation.
  • SB632: Public utilities; aggregate energy storage capacity in the Commonwealth.
  • SB634: Alternative and efficient energies; subsidies and effective clause.
  • SB635: Right to reproductive choice; right to refuse contraception.
  • SB636: Racial inequity; repeals numerous obsolete and discriminatory Acts.
  • SB637: Estate tax; reinstatement.
  • SB638: Affordable housing; location near Metrorail station.
  • SB639: Virginia Growth and Opportunity Fund; regional grant awards.
  • SB640: Unlawful detainer; expungement of actions, effective date.
  • SB641: Civil action; sale of personal data.
  • SB642: Multi-jurisdiction grand jury; functions, failure to pay wages.
  • SB645: Local arbitration agreements; disclosure of certain information.
  • SB646: Tetrahydrocannabinol concentration; definition.
  • SB655: Physical injuries or death caused to a person; consideration of bills.
  • SB658: Contracts with design professionals; provisions requiring a duty to defend void.
  • SB659: Contributory negligence; motor vehicle accident involving a pedestrian, bicyclist, etc.
  • SB661: Accrual of cause of action; diagnoses of nonmalignant and malignant asbestos-related injury.
  • SB663: Practice of medicine and other healing arts; provision of litigation assistance.
  • SB664: Motor vehicles; liability insurance coverage limits, effective date.
  • SB937: TANF Scholarship Pilot Program; VCCS to establish and administer.
  • SB963: Energy manager; responsibilities.
  • SB995: Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority; labor organizations.
  • SB1043: Civil actions; filed on behalf of multiple persons.
  • SB1092: Performance guarantees, certain; provisions for periodic partial and final release.
  • SB5032: Assault and battery; penalty.
  • SB5033: Court authority in criminal cases; prosecutorial discretion to dispose of a criminal case.
  • SB5045: Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission, et al.; required to prepare fiscal impact statements.
  • SJ34: Mandatory minimum sentences; VSCC to study use, etc.
  • SJ47: Court of Appeals of Virginia; Judicial Council of Virginia to study jurisdiction and organization.
  • SJ153: Commending River Oaks Elementary School.
  • SJ154: Commending Triangle Elementary School.
  • SJ155: Commending Forest Park High School.
  • SR71: Commending the Lee-Mount Vernon Sports Club.
  • SR516: Commending Lloyd J. 'Bud' Vye.
  • SR564: Commending the Honorable Janine M. Saxe.
  • SB93: Parole; eligibility for, at liberty between offenses.
  • SB613: Local government; deposition.
  • SB737: Driving under influence of alcohol; license conditions for first offense.
  • SB765: Coal ash ponds; mandatory testing of drinking water wells in Chesapeake Bay watershed.
  • SB766: Citizen water quality monitoring; use as evidence in enforcement actions.
  • SB767: Coal ash ponds; flaws in closure plans, delay of permit.
  • SB768: Electric utilities; recovery of costs associated with closure in place of coal ash facilities.
  • SB770: Absentee voting; alternative locations for in-person absentee voting.
  • SB771: Absentee voting; counting military and overseas absentee ballots received after close of polls.
  • SB808: Electric utilities; Transitional Rate Period, coal combustion residuals landfills.
  • SB938: Child support; withholding of income, contracts with an independent contractor.
  • SB1533: Coal combustion residuals; Chesapeake Bay watershed, closure.
  • SB1534: Coal combustion residuals; cleanup costs.
  • SB1535: Uniform Statewide Building Code; outdoor advertising.
  • SB1536: Out-of-state conviction of drug offenses; petition for restricted driver's license.
  • SB1537: Virginia Property Owners' Association Act; home-based businesses.
  • SB1538: Common interest communities; dissemination of annual budget, reserve for capital components.
  • SB1539: Child support; withholding of income of independent contractors.
  • SB1540: Protective orders; contents of preliminary orders, docketing of appeal.
  • SB1541: No-fault divorce; waiver of service of process.
  • SB1542: Civil actions; determination of indigency, no-fault divorce.
  • SB1543: Wrongful death beneficiaries; parents of decedent who receive support or services, etc.
  • SB1544: Assisted conception; parentage presumption.
  • SB1548: Consumer finance companies; loans, licensing.
  • SB1549: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; exclusion.
  • SB1550: Bicyclists & other vulnerable road users; person who operates a motor vehicle in a careless manner.
  • SB1551: School resource officers; memorandums of understanding.
  • SB1552: Absentee voting; alternative locations for in-person absentee voting.
  • SB1553: Urban county executive form of government; abandoned shopping carts.
  • SB1554: Virginia Freedom of Information Act (FOIA); violations and civil penalties.
  • SB1691: Dumfries, Town of; amending charter, town council elections, etc.
  • SB1740: Driver privilege cards; penalty.
  • SB1756: Virginia Condominium and Virginia Property Owners' Association Acts; stormwater facilities.
  • SB1757: Custody and visitation arrangements; best interests of the child, domestic abuse and child abuse.
  • SB1758: Juvenile and domestic relations district courts; jurisdiction, specific findings of fact.
  • SB1759: Underground electric distribution lines; placing in areas of transit-oriented development.
  • SJ438: Celebrating the life of John Harper.
  • SJ439: Commending United Community Ministries, Inc.
  • SJ440: Commending the Northern Virginia Conservation Trust.
  • SJ441: Commending the Prince William County Bar Association.
  • SJ442: Commending Neabsco Elementary School.
  • SJ461: Commending Barney Barnwell.
  • SJ465: Commending the Honorable Jan Brodie.
  • SB21: Grand larceny & certain property crimes; increases threshold amount of money taken, etc., to $500.
  • SB22: Security freezes; elimination of fees.
  • SB74: Handheld personal communications devices; use while driving.
  • SB85: Protective orders, preliminary; contents of order.
  • SB86: Driver's license; driving after forfeiture of license, penalty.
  • SB87: Careless driving; cause of injury to vulnerable road user.
  • SB88: Bicycle lane; penalty for driver to pass another vehicle using lane.
  • SB89: Child abuse or neglect; civil proceedings, testimony of children.
  • SB93: Parole, eligibility for; at liberty between offenses.
  • SB94: Police and court records; expungement of records.
  • SB95: Security freezes; protected consumer, proof of authority,
  • SB245: Conversion therapy; prohibited by certain health care providers.
  • SB447: Firearms; transfers, etc., penalties.
  • SB607: Electronic transmission of sexually explicit images by minors; penalties.
  • SB608: Police and court records; expungement, plea agreements.
  • SB609: Juvenile offenders; Retention of jurisdiction.
  • SB610: Adultery; reduces Class 4 misdemeanor to a civil penalty.
  • SB611: Motor vehicles; increases liability insurance coverage limits.
  • SB612: Assisted conception; parentage presumption.
  • SB613: Local government; deposition.
  • SB614: Spousal support; modification.
  • SB615: Spousal support payments; employer withholding.
  • SB616: Waiver of immunity; persons covered by insurance policy.
  • SB617: Statute of limitations; discovery rule.
  • SB618: Expert witnesses; no fees shall be charged by government officer and employees.
  • SB619: Virginia Human Rights Act; limitations on causes of action.
  • SB620: Arbitration; denial of motion to compel.
  • SB621: Driver privilege cards; authorizes issuance of new cards by DMV.
  • SB622: Local transportation plan; secondary system road construction program allocation.
  • SB623: Electronic Routing Registry; created.
  • SB624: Va. Consumer Protection Act; open-end credit plans.
  • SB625: Consumer finance companies; licensing by SCC.
  • SB626: Life insurance on minors; consent of parents.
  • SB627: Home inspection servicers; certain contract provisions prohibited.
  • SB628: Notaries; qualifications, misdemeanor offense of moral turpitude.
  • SB629: State Corporation Commission; disclosures of information provided by financial institutions.
  • SB630: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; civil penalty.
  • SB705: Va. Condominium & Property Owners' Association Act; contents of disclosure packets.
  • SB706: Common interest communities; reserves for capital components, budget.
  • SB707: Virginia Property Owners' Association Act; home-based businesses.
  • SB722: Condominium and Property Owners' Association Acts; access to association books and records.
  • SB737: Driving under influence of alcohol; license conditions for first offense.
  • SB765: Coal ash ponds; mandatory testing of drinking water wells in Chesapeake Bay watershed.
  • SB766: Citizen water quality monitoring; use as evidence in enforcement actions.
  • SB767: Coal ash ponds; flaws in closure plans, delay of permit.
  • SB768: Electric utilities; recovery of costs associated with closure in place of coal ash facilities.
  • SB769: Alcoholic beverage control; beer licenses.
  • SB770: Absentee voting; alternative locations for in-person absentee voting.
  • SB771: Absentee voting; counting military and overseas absentee ballots received after close of polls.
  • SB772: Claims; Danial J Williams, Joseph Jesse Dick, Jr., Eric Cameron Wilson, and Derek Elliot Tice.
  • SB785: Electronic textbooks; prohibits local school boards from requiring use in any course in grades 6-12.
  • SB786: Public schools; fee for enrollment of certain students.
  • SB787: Governor's Schools; enrollment.
  • SB789: Family life education; sexually explicit communications and images.
  • SB807: Coal combustion residuals and other units; permits, request for proposals.
  • SB808: Electric utilities; Transitional Rate Period, coal combustion residuals landfills.
  • SB938: Child support; withholding of income, contracts with an independent contractor.
  • SB951: Eastern Virginia; hydraulic fracturing prohibited.
  • SJ4: United States Constitution; ratifies Equal Rights Amendment.
  • SJ17: Commending the Honorable Gerald Bruce Lee.
  • SJ28: Driving under influence of alcohol; VSCC to study decrease in convictions.
  • SJ58: Law clerks; study on use and impact on judicial workload and work product.
  • SJ72: Commending the Honorable Helen Leiner.
  • SJ103: Commending the Honorable Craig D. Johnston.
  • SJ147: Commending the Honorable James C. Cacheris.
  • SJ148: Commending Fort Hunt Little League.
  • SJ149: Commending Riverside Elementary School.
  • SJ150: Commending John F. Pattie Sr. Elementary School.
  • SJ240: Commending Embark Richmond Highway.
  • SJ243: Commending the Mount Vernon Voice.
  • SB255: Toll relief; Department of Transportation to study.
  • SB533: Sales and use tax; exemption for certain nonprofit entities.
  • SB741: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • SB752: Health insurance provider contracts; accepting enrollees as patients.
  • SB814: Foreign business entities; services of summons for witness or subpoena duces tecum.
  • SB815: Child support, unpaid; priority of debts to be paid from decedent's assets.
  • SB816: Grand larceny & certain property crimes; increases threshold amount of money taken, etc., to $1,000.
  • SB817: Restricted driver's license; purposes.
  • SB818: Potomac River Watershed; DEQ to identify owner of any combined sewer overflow outfall, etc.
  • SB860: Use of handheld personal communications devices while driving; penalty.
  • SB861: Preliminary protective orders; contents of order.
  • SB862: Driving after forfeiture of license.
  • SB863: Operating a motor vehicle; obstructed view; secondary offense.
  • SB906: Introduction of snakehead fish; penalty.
  • SB907: Higher educational institutions, public; certain positions require residency of the Commonwealth.
  • SB1102: FOIA; records of completed unattended death investigations, definition, mandatory disclosure.
  • SB1103: FOIA; closed meeting violations, civil penalty.
  • SB1104: Form of ballot; order of independent candidates, required paperwork.
  • SB1124: Adultery; civil penalty.
  • SB1125: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; open-end credit plans.
  • SB1126: Consumer finance companies; Internet loans, report.
  • SB1335: Electronic textbooks; prohibits local school boards from requiring use in any course in grades 6-12.
  • SB1336: Sales and use tax; school supplies and hurricane preparedness sales tax holidays.
  • SB1337: Claims; Davey Reedy.
  • SB1338: Bicycle lane; penalty for driver to pass another vehicle using lane.
  • SB1339: Careless driving; infliction of injury on vulnerable road user.
  • SB1340: Towing; regulations.
  • SB1341: Government records; digital certification.
  • SB1342: District courts; jurisdictional limit does not include any attorney fees.
  • SB1343: Guardian ad litem; reimbursement for cost.
  • SB1344: In camera interviews of child; court's discretion to conduct recording or transcript.
  • SB1345: Driver privilege cards; issuance of new cards by DMV.
  • SB1346: Associate-degree-granting institutions; transfer of credit information.
  • SB1383: Coal ash; treatment by utilities, recycling.
  • SB1398: Coal combustion residuals unit; closure permit, assessments required.
  • SB1399: Coal combustion by-product impoundments; closure requirements.
  • SB1405: Higher educational institutions, public; notice of proposed tuition increase.
  • SB1439: Firearms; transfers to a non-licensed dealer.
  • SB1498: Intoxicated drivers; punitive damages for persons injured.
  • SB1512: Charitable gaming; conduct of games, special permits.
  • SJ84: Public transportation services; DRPT to evaluate study necessary to identify, etc.
  • SJ221: United States Constitution; Ratifies Equal Rights Amendment.
  • SJ226: Constitutional amendment; registration of voters (first reference).
  • SJ227: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); Governor's term of office.
  • SJ291: Study; Virginia State Crime Commission; decrease in driving a motor vehicle while intoxicated.
  • SJ292: Study; SCHEV; financial reserves; report.
  • SJ364: Commending Marine Corps Base Quantico.
  • SJ365: Commending the Honorable David S. Schell.
  • SJ366: Celebrating the life of Fannie Wilkinson Fitzgerald.
  • SJ370: Commending Bernard S. Cohen and Philip J. Hirschkop.
  • SJ374: Commending Alexandra Blaire Krieger.
  • SJ375: Commending the Honorable Jane Marum Roush.
  • SJ376: Celebrating the life of Michael Moore Skinner.
  • SJ377: Commending Occoquan Elementary School.
  • SJ442: Commending Tauxemont Cooperative Preschool.
  • SR130: Commending the Honorable Lon E. Farris.
  • SB164: Consumer finance loans; rate of interest.
  • SB165: Open-end credit agreements; sellers of certain goods to extend credit.
  • SB166: Motor vehicle title lenders; narrows exemption for consumer finance companies.
  • SB167: Consumer finance companies; annual reports.
  • SB170: Nonsuits; tolling of limitations, contractual limitation periods.
  • SB171: Insurance; jury award of attorney fees for bad faith.
  • SB172: Foreign entities; consent to jurisdiction & service of summons for witness or subpoena duces tecum.
  • SB173: Child custody or visitation; filing single petition.
  • SB174: Adultery; reduces penalty to a civil penalty.
  • SB177: Grand larceny; increases threshold amount of money taken, etc., to $1,000.
  • SB255: Toll relief; Department of Transportation to study.
  • SB256: High-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes; statute of limitations on penalties.
  • SB257: HOV and HOT lanes; penalties, increased fines for subsequent offenses.
  • SB258: Commonwealth Transportation Board; voting weighted by population.
  • SB259: Persons involuntarily admitted or ordered to outpatient treatment; purchase, etc., of ammunition.
  • SB260: Concealed handgun permit; disqualifications, residential mental health or substance abuse treatment.
  • SB261: Driving under influence; private property.
  • SB262: Conversion therapy prohibited.
  • SB263: Firearms; purchase by persons intending to commit act of terrorism, penalty.
  • SB318: Certificate of relief from collateral criminal consequences.
  • SB386: Evidence; objections to business records.
  • SB387: Regulation of towing.
  • SB388: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; failure to make required statement.
  • SB389: Local permitting or licensure; consent of common interest community association prohibited.
  • SB390: Temporary visitor's driver's licenses; DMV may issue.
  • SB391: Driver's license; driving after forfeiture, guilty of an offense.
  • SB392: Real property; judgment creditor may record an instrument, upon payment of fee for recordation, etc.
  • SB393: Preliminary protective orders; contents of order.
  • SB492: FOIA; limitation on exemption for certain criminal investigative files.
  • SB493: FOIA; closed meeting not authorized for discussion of pay increases.
  • SB494: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; record exclusions, rule of redaction, etc.
  • SB531: Digital document authentication standards; Secretary of the Commonwealth to establish.
  • SB532: Paper and plastic bags; authorizes localities in Planning District 8 by ordinance to impose a tax.
  • SB533: Sales and use tax; exemption for certain nonprofit entities.
  • SB534: Criminal history record information; unauthorized dissemination, civil actions.
  • SB537: Coal combustion by-product impoundments; closure requirements.
  • SB538: Students with limited English proficiency; alternative to the eleventh grade Standards of Learning.
  • SB539: Conflict of Interests Act, State and Local Government; requirement to file semiannual disclosure.
  • SB572: Improper driving; jury may find accused not guilty.
  • SB649: Claims; Davey Reedy.
  • SB663: Careless driving; cause of injury to vulnerable road user.
  • SB664: Ballots; order of names of candidates for school boards.
  • SB739: Drug products; products compounded by nonresident outsourcing facilities.
  • SB740: Electronic textbooks; use by students.
  • SB741: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • SB752: Health insurance provider contracts; accepting enrollees as patients.
  • SJ1: United States Constitution; ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment.
  • SJ84: Public transportation services; DRPT to evaluate study necessary to identify, etc.
  • SJ141: Commending Charles Haley.
  • SJ167: Commending the Prince William County Department of Fire and Rescue.
  • SJ190: Commending the Friends of Dyke Marsh.
  • SJ191: Commending Rising Hope United Methodist Mission Church.
  • SJ192: Commending Swans Creek Elementary School.
  • SJ197: Commending Anne Andrews.
  • SJ205: Commending Inova Mount Vernon Hospital.
  • SR89: Commending the Honorable Teena D. Grodner.
  • SR90: Commending the Honorable Thomas E. Gallahue.
  • SR91: Commending the Honorable Ian M. OFlaherty.
  • HB1289: Same-sex marriages; civil unions.
  • HB1684: Standards of Learning assessments; waivers.
  • HB2010: Public elementary and secondary schools; uniform statewide grading scale.
  • HB2011: Motor vehicle title lenders; location of offices.
  • HB2012: Starter interrupt devices; prohibits requiring installation on certain motor vehicles.
  • HB2013: State Corporation Commission; disclosure of records related to administrative activities.
  • HB2014: Adultery; reduces penalty from a Class 4 misdemeanor to a civil penalty.
  • HB2015: Creditor process; bankruptcy proceeding exemptions.
  • HB2016: Personal injury or wrongful death action; qualification of fiduciary.
  • HB2017: Aircraft, certain; local regulation.
  • HB2232: Persons involuntarily admitted or ordered to outpatient treatment; purchase, etc., ammunition.
  • HB2337: Family life education; sexually explicit communications and images.
  • HB2339: Electronic textbooks; access by students in their residence.
  • HB2375: Employers; reasonable accommodation for employees with disability.
  • HJ493: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); marriage.
  • HJ494: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); registration of voters.
  • HJ495: United States Constitution; Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ496: Constitutional amendment (first resolution); Governor's term of office.
  • HJ581: Highways; JLARC to study alternative taxes and fees for funding in the Commonwealth.
  • HJ582: Electronic government records; joint subcommittee to study feasibility of authenticating records.
  • HJ583: Local government charter, model; joint subcommittee established to study creation of charter.
  • HJ625: Education resources; DOE, et al; to study allocations.
  • HJ675: Commending the Honorable Dennis J. Smith.
  • HJ676: Commending the Honorable Charles J. Maxfield.
  • HJ677: Celebrating the life of the Honorable R. Terrence Ney.
  • HJ678: Celebrating the life of Jean Williams Auldridge.
  • HJ710: Celebrating the life of Warren Ira Cikins.
  • HJ787: Celebrating the life of the Honorable Herbert E. Harris II.
  • HJ867: Commending the Honorable Donald P. McDonough.
  • HJ868: Commending the Fairfax Young Democrats.
  • HJ869: Commending Mount Vernon Woods Elementary School.
  • HJ872: Commending Gerald W. Hyland.
  • HR303: Commending Hollin Meadows Elementary School.
  • HR307: Celebrating the life of Lieutenant Colonel John Albert Bornmann, Jr., USA (Ret.).
  • HB4: Hybrid electric motor vehicles; repeals annual license tax, refunds.
  • HB244: Grand larceny; threshold.
  • HB245: Conflict of Interests Act, State and Local Government; prohibited contracts between Governor.
  • HB246: Governor and Attorney General; parties to litigation with state, prohibited conduct, penalties.
  • HB247: Governor's Development Opportunity Fund; political contributions and gifts, prohibited conduct.
  • HB248: Special counsel; cap on compensation paid to those appointed to handle certain legal matters.
  • HB249: Judgment proceeding; setting aside judgment confessed.
  • HB250: Child custody or visitation; petition.
  • HB251: Real Estate Board; death or disability of a broker.
  • HB252: Public assets; misuse, penalty.
  • HB327: Law-Enforcement Officers Procedural Guarantee Act; definition of law-enforcement officer.
  • HB378: Improper driving; jury hearing case.
  • HB379: Commonwealth Transportation Board; changes composition of membership.
  • HB380: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; disclosure pursuant to court order or subpoena.
  • HB934: Security freezes; protected consumers, penalties.
  • HB936: Electronic textbooks; accessibility by students at school and in their residence.
  • HB937: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; application to the State Corporation Commission, exemptions.
  • HB938: Jurors; persons liable to serve.
  • HB939: Same-sex marriages; civil unions.
  • HB940: Adultery; reduces civil penalty.
  • HB941: Operating a vehicle or vessel containing a false compartment; penalty.
  • HB942: Death sentences; removes electrocution as manner of execution for prisoners, lethal injection.
  • HB943: Ignition interlock system; time for installation.
  • HB944: Ignition interlock systems; DUI drugs.
  • HB945: Driving under influence of alcohol; first offenders, license conditions.
  • HB964: Firearms; purchase by persons intending to commit act of terrorism, penalty.
  • HB979: Businesses, certain; local limitations on number.
  • HB980: Absentee voting; publication of street address for return of absentee ballots.
  • HB982: Police and court records; expungement of records, waiver of hearing.
  • HB984: Appeal from bail, bond, or recognizance order; compliance with appellate court.
  • HB1061: Electric utility regulation; renewable energy portfolio standard program.
  • HB1158: Distributed electric generation; establishment of community solar gardens.
  • HB1198: School buildings; National Register of Historic Places and Virginia Landmarks Register.
  • HB1248: 911 emergency service calls; recordings shall be deemed authentic if with certain information.
  • HB1260: Sexually explicit images; electronic transmission by minors, penalty.
  • HJ11: Constitutional amendment; marriage (first reference).
  • HJ12: United States Constitution; General Assembly to ratify and affirm Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ178: Celebrating the life of Lieutenant Colonel Gerald L. Read, USA (Ret.).
  • HJ179: Commending the Honorable Jonathan Cooper Thacher.
  • HJ181: Celebrating the life of Clifford Scott Hardison.
  • HJ189: Commending Good Shepherd Housing and Family Services, Inc.
  • HJ325: Commending Hybla Valley Elementary School.
  • HJ431: Commending West Potomac High School.
  • HJ436: Celebrating the life of Paul Russell.
  • HJ439: Commending Mount Vernon High School.
  • HJ440: Commending Bucknell Elementary School.
  • HB660: Solar photovoltaic power production projects; VDOT to lease space within highway rights-of-way.
  • HB679: Criminal history information; prohibits sale of person's conviction when record is expunged.
  • HB1908: Commonwealth Transportation Board; changes composition.
  • HB1909: Driving under influence of alcohol; defendant's blood or breath tested, exemplary damages.
  • HB1910: Voter registration; change of address.
  • HB1911: Judicial Council; directed to report on law clerks used by appellate and circuit courts.
  • HB1912: Child custody or visitation; issues may be included in single petition in JDRDC.
  • HB1913: Mechanics' liens; licensed contractors.
  • HB1914: Criminal history record information; unauthorized sale, publication, etc.
  • HB1915: Electronic textbooks; prohibits school board from making available for use by students in residence.
  • HB1916: Income tax, state and corporate; tax credit for solar thermal systems.
  • HB1917: Electric utilities; renewable thermal energy.
  • HB1973: Real Estate Board; death or disability of a broker.
  • HB2011: Urban county executive form of government; abandoned personal property.
  • HB2321: Virginia Freedom of Information Act; State Corporation Commission subject to Act.
  • HB2322: Community Colleges, State Board for; Board shall develop mental health referral policies, etc.
  • HB2323: Motor vehicles; locality may reasonably limit number of title loan businesses, payday lenders, etc.
  • HJ665: Constitutional amendment; repealing amendment dealing with marriage (first reference).
  • HJ666: State renewable energy utility; joint subcommittee to study feasibility of establishing.
  • HJ667: United States Constitution; General Assembly hereby ratifies and affirms Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ668: Constitutional amendment; registration of voters (first reference).
  • HJ792: Commending Stratford Landing Elementary School.
  • HJ873: Commending the Honorable Stewart P. Davis.
  • HJ874: Commending the Honorable Leslie M. Alden.
  • HJ875: Commending the Honorable Marcus D. Williams.
  • HJ876: Commending the Alice Ferguson Foundation.
  • HJ877: Commending Gum Springs.
  • HJ878: Commending Bethlehem Baptist Church.
  • HJ950: Commending Washington Mill Elementary School.
  • HR153: Commending Hollin Hall Senior Center.
  • HB659: Transportation Board; increases number of members.
  • HB660: Solar photovoltaic power production projects; VDOT to lease space within highway rights-of-way.
  • HB661: Workers' compensation benefits; refusal of employment by disabled employee.
  • HB662: Community Colleges, State Board for; development of mental health services.
  • HB663: Child care subsidies; time limits.
  • HB664: Tax credits, state; publication of names on Department of Taxation's website.
  • HB665: Lobbying and finance disclosure; disclosure of gifts and contributions.
  • HB666: General Assembly Conflicts of Interests Act; disclosure requirements.
  • HB667: Political contributions; prohibitions during procurement process.
  • HB668: Condominium and Property Owners' Association Acts; posting of documents on association website.
  • HB669: Absentee voting; persons age 65 and older on day of election may vote absentee.
  • HB670: Voter registration; copy of change of address made at DMV shall be forwarded to Board of Elections.
  • HB671: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • HB672: Community Solar Gardens; created.
  • HB673: Protective orders; Allows general distict court to transfer case to appropriate court.
  • HB674: Protective orders; minor may petition on his own behalf without consent of parent or guardian.
  • HB675: Grand larceny; increases threshold amount from $200 to $500.
  • HB676: Child support; interest on arrearage.
  • HB677: Power of attorney; termination.
  • HB678: Virginia Consumer Protection Act; local towing ordinances.
  • HB679: Criminal history information; prohibits sale of person's conviction when record is expunged.
  • HB680: Driving under influence of alcohol; award of exemplary damages.
  • HB681: Interest on appeal; computed from date of filing notice of to date appellate court issues mandate.
  • HB682: Child custody or visitation; issues may be included in single petition in JDRC; etc.
  • HB683: Courthouses and courtrooms; assessment for security.
  • HJ114: State renewable energy utility; joint subcommittee to study feasibility of establishing.
  • HJ115: United States Constitution; General Assembly of Va. to ratify and affirm Equal Rights Amendment.
  • HJ211: Commending Major Justin Constantine, United States Marine Corps Reserves.
  • HJ212: Commending Luigi and Anna Maria Tonizzo.
  • HJ214: Celebrating the life of Gilbert S. McCutcheon.
  • HJ229: Defined contribution pension; Va. Congressional Delegation urged to oppose for U.S. Armed Forces.
  • HJ303: Commending Elizabeth Klein.
  • HJ325: Commending Belle View Elementary School.
  • HJ326: Commending Ambassador William Green Miller (Ret.).
  • HJ336: Commending Cynthia N. Hull.
  • HJ397: Commending Eugene J. Coleman III.
  • HJ448: Commending Fort Belvoir.
  • HR4: House of Delegates; recording of standing committee and subcommittee meetings.
  • HR69: Commending Carolyn Gamble.
  • HR505: Commending Heritage Presbyterian Church.
  • HR506: Commending the Mount Vernon Athletic Club.
  • HR511: Celebrating the life of Adelaide Arthur.
  • HB822: Child support, etc.; single petition may be filed in juvenile & domestic relations district court.
  • HB1469: Reckless driving; failing to stop at a school bus.
  • HB1801: Transportation Board; changes composition.
  • HB1802: Personal property tax; classification of certain fuel-efficient motor vehicles.
  • HB1803: Contractors, Board for; provides for certification of home energy auditors.
  • HB1804: House of Delegates; digital recordings of meetings of standing committees and subcommittees.
  • HB1805: Tax administration; awards for detection of tax underpayments.
  • HB1806: Award of credit; Board of Education to provide an elective credit for applied music study of piano.
  • HB1807: Child custody, etc.; single petition may be filed in juvenile & domestic relations district court.
  • HB1808: Arrearages; payments collected by DSS shall be applied first to interest associated with arrearage.
  • HB1809: Attorneys for State and their assistants; duties.
  • HB1810: Grand larceny; increases threshold amount of money or value of goods.
  • HB1811: Child care services; DSS to identify strategies to increase reimbursement rates.
  • HB2459: Absentee voting; persons age 65 and older will be entitled.
  • HB2460: Political contributions; prohibition during procurement process, penalty.
  • HJ603: U.S. Route 1 Corridor; joint subcommittee to study creation of Corridor.
  • HJ604: Constitutional amendment; repeal of state law or regulation by localities (first reference).
  • HJ905: Commending the Sherwood Regional Library.
  • HJ914: Commending Jeff Todd.
  • HJ957: Commending Walt Whitman Middle School on the occasion of its 50th anniversary.
  • HB818: Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB); composition.
  • HB819: Business entities; when referring to service of process includes any subpoena, summons, etc.
  • HB820: Cigarette tax; penalties for unstamped cigarettes.
  • HB821: Child custody; record of in camera interview.
  • HB822: Child support, etc.; single petition may be filed in juvenile & domestic relations district court.
  • HB823: District court; expungement of police and court records.
  • HB824: Melendez-Diaz notice; 6th Amendment rights to be given to an accused who is proceeding pro se.
  • HB825: Civil or criminal actions; allows circuit court clerks to establish electronic filing.
  • HB826: Electronic summons system; locality to assess an additional sum in district or circuit court.
  • HB827: Electronic recording of court proceedings; circuit & district court clerks have system in courtroom.
  • HB828: Larceny; increases threshold amount of goods that determines petit larceny to grand larceny.
  • HB829: Expert witnesses; extends application of two evidentiary statutes applicable in certain cases.
  • HB830: Food and beverage tax; adds Fairfax County to those that may impose.
  • HB831: Public Procurement Act; foreign & domestic businesses authorized to transact business in State.
  • HB832: Absentee voting; requires election results for central absentee voter precinct to indicate precinct.
  • HB833: Asbestos, Lead, Mold, and Home Inspectors, Board for; regulation of home energy auditors.
  • HB1262: Absentee voting procedures; deletes certain requirements.
  • HJ119: Route 1 Corridor; joint subcommittee to study creation thereof.
  • HJ430: Commending Ventures Outreach, New Hope Housing and the Rising Hope United Methodist Mission church.
  • HJ431: Commending West Potomac High School on the occasion of its 25th anniversary.
  • HJ432: Commending the agencies, companies, organizations, and people who assisted Virginians in the afterma